Open Educational Resources and Practices

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Lecture in Tallinn University, 18 April 2013

Published in: Education, Technology

Open Educational Resources and Practices

  1. 1. Open EducationalResources and PracticesHans Põldoja
  2. 2. Hans PõldojaResearcherTallinn University, Institute of InformaticsDoctoral studentAalto University, School of Arts, Design and Architecturehans.poldoja@tlu.eehttp://www.hanspoldoja.net
  3. 3. Outline• Copyright (and why it doesn’t work)• Open Licensing• Open Content• Open Educational Resources• Open Online Courses• Open Learning Goals• Open Assessment
  4. 4. Copyright(and why it doesn’t work)
  5. 5. What is protected by copyright?• Literary works• Musical works, including any accompanying words• Dramatic works, including any accompanying music• Pantomimes and choreographic works• Pictorial, graphic and sculptural works• Motion pictures and other audiovisual works• Sound recordings• Architectural works• Computer software
  6. 6. What is not under copyright?• Works that have not been fixed in a tangible form of expression (not written or recorded)• Facts• Ideas, principles and concepts• Works for which copyright has expired
  7. 7. Duration of copyright• Copyright protection starts from the time the work is created in a fixed form• Copyright protection lasts authors’ lifetime and 70 years after death
  8. 8. Economic rights• Reproduction• Distribution• Rental• Broadcasting• Public performance• ...
  9. 9. Moral rights• Attribution• Anonymous or pseudonymous publishing• Integrity of the work• Withdrawal• ...
  10. 10. LimitationsEU Copyright Directive lists a number of limitations thatcan be applied by the member states, including: • Reproductions by public libraries, educational institutions or archives for non-commercial use • Use for illustration for teaching or scientific research, to the extent justified by the non-commercial purpose • Communication of works to the public within the premises of public libraries, educational institutions, museums or archives
  11. 11. Problems in the context of digital learning resources• What extent of educational reuse is justified by the non-commercial purpose?• Translation and modification of the work requires agreement from the author
  12. 12. Open Licensing
  13. 13. http://creativecommons.org
  14. 14. Creative Commons licenses• Attribution (CC BY)• Attribution-Share Alike (CC BY-SA)• Attribution-NoDerivs (CC BY-ND)• Attribution-Noncommercial (CC BY-NC)• Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike (CC BY-NC-SA)• Attribution-Noncommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)
  15. 15. License conditions Attribution — You must attribute the work in theb manner specified by the author or licensor Share Alike — If you alter, transform, or build upona this work, you may distribute the resulting work only under the same or similar license to this one Noncommercial — You may not use this work forn commercial purposes No Derivative Works — You may not alter,d transform, or build upon this work
  16. 16. Rights Share — to copy, distribute and transmits the workr Remix — to adapt the work
  17. 17. Three “Layers” of licenses (Creative Commons, 2012)
  18. 18. How to recognize CC licensed works?
  19. 19. Marking licenses• If no license information is included with the work, then users must assume that all rights are reserved• Title of the license, icon and link are added to openly licensed content
  20. 20. Creative Commons icons
  21. 21. Open Content
  22. 22. http://en.wikipedia.org
  23. 23. http://www.wikimedia.org
  24. 24. http://commons.wikimedia.org
  25. 25. http://www.flickr.com/creativecommons
  26. 26. http://search.creativecommons.org
  27. 27. Open Educational Resources
  28. 28. What are OER’s?Open Educational Resources (OER) are digitalmaterials that can be re-used for teaching, learning,research and more, made available free through openlicenses, which allow uses of the materials that wouldnot be easily permitted under copyright alone. (Wikipedia, 2012)
  29. 29. http://ocw.mit.edu
  30. 30. http://www.ocwconsortium.org
  31. 31. http://www.curriki.org
  32. 32. http://www.ck12.org
  33. 33. http://www.oercommons.org
  34. 34. http://www.khanacademy.org
  35. 35. http://wikieducator.org
  36. 36. http://en.wikibooks.org
  37. 37. http://en.wikiversity.org
  38. 38. http://lemill.net
  39. 39. Open Online Courses
  40. 40. http://oercourse.wordpress.com
  41. 41. http://mooc.ca
  42. 42. http://p2pu.org
  43. 43. c-MOOC vsx-MOOC
  44. 44. free ≠ open
  45. 45. https://www.coursera.org
  46. 46. https://www.edx.org
  47. 47. http://www.udacity.com
  48. 48. http://beta.wikiversity.org
  49. 49. http://oppematerjalid.wordpress.com
  50. 50. http://www.edufeedr.net
  51. 51. Open Learning Goals
  52. 52. Structure of a learning contract• Objectives• Resources• Strategy• Outcome evaluation• Reflection
  53. 53. http://blog.lecontract.org
  54. 54. Open Assessment
  55. 55. http://openbadges.org
  56. 56. https://p2pu.org/en/badges/
  57. 57. http://wikieducator.org/OER_university
  58. 58. References• Creative Commons (2013). About The Licenses. http://creativecommons.org/ licenses/• Wikipedia (2012). Open educational resources. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ Open_educational_resources
  59. 59. Photos• Christopher Sessums, http://www.flickr.com/photos/csessums/4966650988/
  60. 60. Thank You! • hans.poldoja@tlu.ee • http://www.slideshare.net/hanspoldojaThis work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

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