Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Kbat
Kbat
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Kbat

588

Published on

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
588
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
86
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Know and be able to POPULATION GEOGRAPHY KNOW age distribution agricultural density arithmetic density Cairo Conference carrying capacity child mortality rate contraception crude death rate (CDR) crude birth rate (CBR) demographic equation demographic transition dependency ratio doubling time ecumene epidemiological transition infant mortality rate (IMR) J-curve life expectancy (longevity rate) natalism (pro- and anti-) natural increase rate (NIR, RNI) Neomalthusians overpopulation physiological density population agglomerations population pyramid replacement fertility S-curve sex ratio total fertility rate (TFR) zero population growth activity space brain drain/gain chain migration (migration ladder) circulation diaspora distance decay function emigration/immigration forced/voluntary migration gravity model guest worker internal migration/international migration intervening obstacle/opportunity migration transition migration stream migration selectivity mobility net migration periodic movement push/pull factors Ravenstein’s Laws remittances step migration time-contract workers transhumance urbanization/suburbanization/ counterurbanization BE ABLE TO • map major and emerging population concentrations and describe demographic characteristics of each. • calculate arithmetic, agricultural, and physiological densities, and describe the strengths and weaknesses of each for demographic analysis. • calculate doubling time and dependency ratios and describe how dependency ratios are interpreted. • explain the elements of a population pyramid and distinguish between characteristic shapes. • explain (with examples) the demographic transition model. • explain changes – or potential changes – and the implications of each for a country’s population: changes in epidemiology, changes and age distributions and gender ratios, issues of overpopulation. • give examples of pro- and anti-natalist policies and their effects in example countries. • define key demographic terms and identify regions in which high and low extreme examples of each can be found. • explain how distance decay, intervening obstacles, migration selectivity factors affect migration and circulation patterns • discuss the migration history of the United States through the following: immigration history, immigration policy, historic and contemporary streams of migration, internal migration patterns • distinguish between and give characteristics of the following types of human movement: circulation and migration, forced and voluntary migration, immigrants and emigrants, push and pull factors • discuss the contributions of Ravenstein to the study of human movement and migration • use the gravity model to predict migration and evaluate its efficiency and usefulness • describe specific examples of historic and contemporary forced migrations, explaining push and pull factors associated with each • characterize a refugee and refugee population Case Studies ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________
  • 2. • correlate migration patterns to the demographic transition model. 51

×