Accessing SharePoint 2010
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Accessibility is on the minds of most public sector and many private sector organizations in Ontario, Canada that are creating new or significantly upgrading their existing websites. The government ...

Accessibility is on the minds of most public sector and many private sector organizations in Ontario, Canada that are creating new or significantly upgrading their existing websites. The government is mandating conformance to strict guidelines defined by WCAG 2.0. Does SharePoint have what it takes to do the job?

In this presentation I provide you with an overview of the Accessibility to Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) and its relationship to WCAG 2.0, and outline the key areas that need to be considered when building AODA-compliant sites. Finally I will present results of short experiments I did on SharePoint 2010 as it relates to accessibility.

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  • We all use the internet every day for work, education, and entertainment.Fortunately for most of us here we are able to see, hear, and interact with the systems as they were intended to be used.
  • In 2006, 14.3% (4.4M) of Canadians reported having a disability.15% of those (687k) live in Ontario.

Accessing SharePoint 2010 Accessing SharePoint 2010 Presentation Transcript

  • Accessing SharePoint 2010 Haniel Croitoru, MSc, PMP, PMI-ACP J U NE 21 , 20 1 1
  • Haniel Croitoru • Senior SharePoint consultant with over 15 years of experience • Worked in public and private sector verticals including healthcare, financial services, utilities, and consulting Scrum Master, Project Manager, SharePoint Evangelist • Since 2003 focusing on SharePoint, delivering solutions and contributing as Business Analyst and Trainer • Masters of Science in Computer Science with a specialty in Computer-Assisted Orthopedic Surgery from Queen’s University and a Master’s Certificate in Project Management from the York Schulich School of Business • Project Management Professional (PMP) since 2007 and an Agile Certified Practitioner since 2013 From Folders to Metadata – a short lesson in history 6/21/2011 2
  • Agenda • Disability in everyday life • Accessibility to Ontarians • Achieving accessibility • SharePoint experiment • Final thoughts From Folders to Metadata – a short lesson in history 6/21/2011 3
  • disabilities in everyday life
  • Internet in our everyday lives
  • A reality for disabled people may look like
  • A reality for disabled people 2+2= may seem like
  • People with disabilities in Canada 25.0% • In 2006, 14.3% (4.4M) of Canadians reported having a disability. 20.0% 15.0% 10.0% 5.0% 0.0% NL PE NS NB QC ON MB SK AB BC YT NT NU
  • Types of Disabilities Dysfunction in one or more of the processes involved in understanding or using symbols or spoken language Auditory (deafness or hearing impediment) Coordination (lack of physical co-ordination, diabetes mellitus, amputation) Coordination (epilepsy, a brain injury, varying paralysis) Mental impairment or a developmental disability, mental disorder Visual (blindness or visual impediment) Speech (muteness or speech impediment) Mobility (physical reliance on a guide dog or other animal or on a wheelchair or other remedial appliance or device)
  • accessibility to ontarians
  • AODA • Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2005 • Recognizing the history of discrimination against persons with disabilities in Ontario, the purpose of this Act is to benefit all Ontarians by, 1. 2. • Developing, implementing and enforcing accessibility standards in order to achieve accessibility for Ontarians with disabilities with respect to goods, services, facilities, accommodation, employment, buildings, structures and premises on or before January 1, 2025; and Providing for the involvement of persons with disabilities, of the Government of Ontario and of representatives of industries and of various sectors of the economy in the development of the accessibility standards. 2005, c. 11, s. 1.
  • AODA Section 14 • Section 14 (INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS) applies to Accessible websites and web content • AODA uses W3C WCAG 2.0 as its conformance benchmark. • By 2021 all new and existing internet and intranet sites for the Government of Ontario, Legislative Assembly, designated public sector organizations and large organizations must conform to WCAG 2.0 Level AA. • Other guideline: Authoring Tool Accessibility Guidelines (ATAG), Accessible Rich Internet Applications (ARIA) and the User Agent Accessibility Guidelines (UAAG).
  • WCAG 2.0 • The Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) explain how to make Web content more accessible to people with disabilities. • Content - information presented to a user in a web page: text, images, forms, sounds, etc. • Principles of Accessibility • Perceivable • Operable • Understandable • Robust • For each guideline, there are testable success criteria, which are at three levels: A, AA, and AAA
  • WCAG 2.0 • Perceivable - Information and user interface components must be presentable to users in ways they can perceive (it can't be invisible to all of their senses). • Operable - User interface components and navigation must be operable (the interface cannot require interaction that a user cannot perform). • Understandable - Information and the operation of user interface must be understandable (the content or operation cannot be beyond their understanding). • Robust - Content must be robust enough that it can be interpreted reliably by a wide variety of user agents, including assistive technologies (as technologies and user agents evolve, the content should remain accessible).
  • achieving accessibility
  • Achieving accessibility using WCAG 2.0 • Text Alternatives • Seizures • Time-based Media • Navigable • Adaptable • Readable • Distinguishable • Predictable • Keyboard Accessible • Input Assistance • Enough Time • Compatible
  • Achieving accessibility using WCAG 2.0 • Text Alternatives The logo on the left is meaningless to someone who doesn’t know SharePoint and its branding.
  • Achieving accessibility using WCAG 2.0 • Time-based Media Users need the ability to control the time it takes to perceive video. This implies having controls to pause, stop, and rewind movies.
  • Achieving accessibility using WCAG 2.0 • Adaptable Username: JDoe DOB: Oct 20, 1974 Member since: Jan 1, 2012 Content should be presentable in different ways (e.g. simpler layout) without losing information or structure Member Status: Active Last Access: Today Username: DOB: Member since: Member Status: Last Access: Today JDoe Oct 20, 1974 Jan 1, 2012 Active
  • Achieving accessibility using WCAG 2.0 • Distinguishable Hello World Make it easier for users to see and hear content including separating foreground from background
  • Achieving accessibility using WCAG 2.0 • Keyboard Accessible Make all functionality available from a keyboard
  • Achieving accessibility using WCAG 2.0 • Enough Time Provide users enough time to read and use content
  • Achieving accessibility using WCAG 2.0 • Seizures Do not design content in a way that is known to cause seizures
  • Achieving accessibility using WCAG 2.0 • Navigable Provide ways to help users navigate, find content, and determine where they are
  • Achieving accessibility using WCAG 2.0 • Readable pLaNeS Clip Each Other at O'HARE; Make text content readable and understandable
  • Achieving accessibility using WCAG 2.0 • Predictable Make Web pages appear and operate in predictable ways
  • Achieving accessibility using WCAG 2.0 • Input Assistance Help users avoid and correct mistakes
  • Achieving accessibility using WCAG 2.0 • Compatible Maximize compatibility with current and future user agents, including assistive technologies
  • sharepoint experiment
  • Validating website accessibility • Over 80 tools available to validate website accessibility (source: W3C Web Accessibility Initiative). • Tools vary in scope of validation, levels of automated testing, reporting, accessibility guidelines tested, licensing and more.
  • SharePoint 2010 Experiment • Scenario 1: Out of the box publishing site
  • SharePoint 2010 Experiment Issues Achecker 10 known errors, 220 potential errors, 54 HTML validation errors, 804 CSS validation errors PowerMapper 14 accessibility issues AMP 80% WCAG Level A compliance 100% WCAG Level AA compliance HiSoftware® Cynthia Says™ 90% WCAG Level AA compliance W3C Markup Validation Service 54 errors Total Validator 97 errors, 8 warnings
  • SharePoint 2010 Experiment • Scenario 1: Out of the box team site
  • SharePoint 2010 Experiment Issues Achecker 31 known errors, 412 potential errors, 151 HTML validation errors, 462 CSS validation errors PowerMapper 22 accessibility issues AMP 88% WCAG Level A compliance 100% WCAG Level AA compliance HiSoftware® Cynthia Says™ 83% WCAG Level AA compliance W3C Markup Validation Service 151 errors, 33 warnings Total Validator 291 errors, 16 warnings
  • Why the differences • Qualitative vs. quantitative • Automated (e.g. computer) vs. Manual (e.g. CNIB) • Server-generated pages vs. final viewable (DOM) pages • Categorization of inconsistencies
  • final thoughts
  • Final Thoughts • Accessibility is here to stay (as long as there are disabled people) • Don’t always believe Microsoft’s claims. • WCAG 2.0 are guidelines to achieve AODA compliance. They are not strict standards. • Validation tools vary in the way they test websites. • Agree on validation tool(s) early in the project lifecycle. • When possible, content validation should be excluded as it will often be out of control of the team building the site.
  • Useful Links • Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2005 www.elaws.gov.on.ca/html/source/regs/english/2011/elaws_src_regs_r1119 1_e.htm • Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 www.w3.org/TR/WCAG/ • Microsoft SharePoint Team Blog – Accessibility and SharePoint 2010 sharepoint.microsoft.com/blog/Pages/BlogPost.aspx?pID=431 • CNIB Accessibility Services www.cnib.ca/en/services/accessibilities/
  • Validation Tools • Achecker achecker.ca/checker/index.php • AMP amp.ssbbartgroup.com/express • HiSoftware® Cynthia Says™ Portal www.contentquality.com/ • PowerMapper SortSite – Accessibility Checker and Validator www.powermapper.com/products/sortsite/checks/accessibilitychecks.htm • Total Validator www.totalvalidator.com • W3C Markup Validation Service validator.w3.org/
  • Thank You haniel@vertexpoint.com ca.linkedin.com/in/hanielcroitoru @TheSharePointPM www.thesharepointpm.com