Nais state of diversity practice public summary

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Nais state of diversity practice public summary

  1. 1. State of the Diversity Practice Analysis Report Prepared for: NAIS June 2009 411 N. Central Ave., Suite 270  Glendale, California 91203 USA T: 866-802-8095  F: 877-866-8301  info@insightlink.com  www.insightlink.com
  2. 2. Table of Contents <ul><li>Background and Methodology 3 </li></ul><ul><li>Executive Summary 4 </li></ul><ul><li>DETAILED FINDINGS </li></ul><ul><li>Who Is Responsible for Diversity? 7 </li></ul><ul><li>What Does “Diversity” Mean to Practitioners? 19 </li></ul><ul><li>What Do Diversity Practitioners Do? 27 </li></ul><ul><li>What is the Role of Diversity in Independent Schools? 39 </li></ul><ul><li>What Do Diversity Practitioners Need, Now and into the Future? 63 </li></ul><ul><li>Which Type of Schools Support Diversity Work? 71 </li></ul>June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report
  3. 3. Background and Methodology <ul><li>This report presents the results of first State of the Diversity Practice survey conducted on behalf of NAIS. NAIS commissioned Insightlink Communications to conduct this study as part of a new strategic initiative with the long-term goal of creating a comprehensive body of knowledge on diversity practice within independent schools. </li></ul><ul><li>The key objectives of this initial research survey are to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify and understand the qualities, roles, functions and backgrounds of diversity practitioners. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Define the roles played by diversity practitioners within independent schools and the support received from the schools (including resources, budget, time, curriculum, etc.) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Explore the challenges, successes, strengths, and weaknesses of pursuing diversity work within independent schools. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>An important goal of this study is to capture both the cognitive (i.e., the “doing” side) as well as the affective components (i.e., the “being” side) of diversity practice. </li></ul><ul><li>To collect the information contained in this report, diversity practitioners were invited by email to complete the online survey. Out of a total of 545 invitations, a total of 181 practitioners started the survey, which represents a participation rate of 33 percent. However, those who did not progress beyond the initial descriptive questions have been removed from the data set. This means that 157 practitioners started the survey and 133 completed it in its full length. </li></ul><ul><li>Most of the measures in the NAIS State of the Diversity Practice study are based on five-point agreement or rating scales. Wherever appropriate, summary means have been provided in addition to percentage distributions. The means are also calculated on a five-point scale, with “1” being low and “5” being high. </li></ul>June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report
  4. 4. Executive Summary June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report
  5. 5. Executive Summary <ul><li>Diversity practice in independent schools is a source of both compassion and optimism on the one hand and of frustration or disappointment on the other. The compassion and optimism come from taking on challenging work that can lead to important change (the “light bulb moment”) toward creating a school environment that is welcoming and appreciative of the differences of others. </li></ul><ul><li>The frustration and disappointment, however, come from the difficulty of translating diversity objectives into true action. While two-thirds of schools’ mission statements include diversity and inclusivity, diversity practitioners appear to have had modest success so far achieving goals of equity, justice, and inclusivity when it comes to admissions, gender, class, sexual orientation, race, ability/disability, or the hiring of faculty. Six-in-10 practitioners report getting strong support for diversity efforts from either the head of school or the other administrators; half of these schools have a formal strategic plan for diversity in place. </li></ul><ul><li>Diversity practice appears to be experiencing the problems of being a fairly “new” profession. Almost half of current practitioners are the first to hold the diversity position within their schools and six-in-ten were asked to take on the role rather than seek it out. </li></ul><ul><li>Even more important, although almost all work full-time at their schools, only one-third work on diversity full- time. Of similar concern, their diversity work is part of a formal job description for six-in-10 administrators but, only three-in-10 agree that their duties and responsibilities as their school’s diversity practitioner are extremely or very well defined. Getting their diversity roles clarified and validated is one of the leading short-term needs of practitioners and getting their schools to design and implement a formal strategic plan for diversity is one of their primary long-term requests. </li></ul><ul><li>Practitioners also express a need for greater training, and it is noteworthy that one-in-five have received no formal diversity training. While most diversity practitioners anticipate continuing working in the field of diversity, they would be helped by a clearer vision of what the work should become. </li></ul>June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report
  6. 6. Executive Summary <ul><li>These findings suggest that there are a variety of initiatives that NAIS could undertake in support of diversity practitioners. There is likely a role for NAIS to play in bridging the gap between the apparent enthusiasm for diversity as an idea at independent schools with the need for greater validation and support for the work being done by diversity practitioners to bring about practical change. </li></ul><ul><li>Some specific actions to consider include: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Helping to “formalize” the profession of diversity, ideally encouraging some form of certification or other types of professional training or recognition. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Providing tools and training to clearly define what roles and responsibilities diversity practitioners should have within independent schools. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Creating a template for a strategic plan for implementing diversity in schools, perhaps in conjunction with the AIM program. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Articulating ways in which school leaders at all levels can visibly demonstrate support for diversity initiatives. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Overall, in review of these results, it seems clear that the entire profession of diversity should be reified and/or codified, so that specific goals, strategies, and outcomes can be established to justify an ongoing commitment to diversity within independent schools. </li></ul>June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report
  7. 7. Executive Summary <ul><li>In response to the 2009 State of Diversity Practice Report and based on the survey results, the following initiatives are underway or are under consideration to be facilitated by the Leadership Education and Diversity (LEAD) team at NAIS, including: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The Equity and Justice Committee of the NAIS board reviewed the report and the committee will continue to use the report to inform how it can support the NAIS staff in developing and delivering programs and initiatives to support diversity practice in independent schools. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The creation of the Heads Equity and Diversity Seminar (H.E.A.D.S.), an opportunity for heads of independent schools to share and learn about diversity from each other and from diversity practitioners. The 2010 H.E.A.D.S. will focus on the dynamics of race and ethnicity in independent schools; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>An updated Assessment of Inclusivity and Multiculturalism (AIM) that gives schools the opportunity to benchmark their school climate survey results with other AIM schools; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The development of a diversity tool kit for diversity practitioners and heads of school; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Exploration of ways to connect and support diversity practitioners, including webinars and podcasts on best practices and innovative ideas; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Creation of opportunities for strengthening the partnership of diversity practitioners and heads of school; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Development of guidelines of best practice for diversity practitioners. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>We welcome your recommendations and we invite you to send them electronically to Gene Batiste, VP, LEAD, at batiste@nais.org. </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report
  8. 8. Who Is Responsible for Diversity? June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report
  9. 9. Who Is Responsible for Diversity? <ul><li>Diversity practitioners share a number of important characteristics: </li></ul><ul><li>The two most popular titles for diversity practitioners are Director/Dean of Diversity (32%) and Diversity Coordinator (30%). More than half of all practitioners also teach at their schools (52%). </li></ul><ul><li>Three-quarters are women and almost half (46%) are under the age of 40. </li></ul><ul><li>Just less than half are African American (45%), about one-quarter (27%) are Caucasian and one-in-10 (11%) are either Latino/Hispanic or Asian American (6%). </li></ul><ul><li>Diversity practitioners are highly educated, as more than six-in-10 (61%) have completed a master’s degree and almost one-in-10 (8%) have a Ph.D. or doctoral degree. About one-quarter are themselves graduates of independent schools (28%). </li></ul><ul><li>Almost nine-in-10 hold full-time positions at their schools (86%). However, just one-third (34%) fulfill their role as their school’s diversity practitioner on a full-time basis. </li></ul><ul><li>Their tenure at their current school covers a wide range, averaging out at almost eight years. Their tenure as a diversity practitioner tends to be somewhat less, working out to six years on average. This suggests that many acquired the role of diversity practitioner after joining their current school. </li></ul><ul><li>Following this same theme, almost six-in-10 practitioners were asked to take on the position (56%), while the remainder (44%) actively sought it out. Among those with this knowledge, the role of diversity practitioner has existed at their school for just seven years. In other words, the position on average has been in place only one year longer than their own tenure. This is confirmed by the finding that just two people on average, including themselves, have held this role at their school. In fact, almost half of diversity practitioners are the first at their school to hold the title of dean or director of diversity (or some equivalent title) themselves. </li></ul><ul><li>Although one-in-five have not received any training (“and, boy, would I like some”), the most popular programs are the NAIS Summer Diversity Institute, corporate or college training, Milton, and NAME. </li></ul>June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report
  10. 10. Title June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 1. Which of the following best reflects your title as a diversity practitioner in your school?
  11. 11. Additional Titles June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 2. In addition to your work as your school’s diversity practitioner, what other title(s) or role(s) do you hold in your school?
  12. 12. Gender and Age June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 58. What is your gender identity?  Male (24%) Female (76%) 56-60 (11%) 51-55 (11%) 46-50 (12%) 41-45 (17%) 36-40 (19%) 35 or younger (27%) 61+ (4%)
  13. 13. Ethnicity June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 60. What is your race/ethnicity?
  14. 14. Education Level June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 61. What is the highest level of education that you have attained? 62. Are you a graduate of an independent school?  Independent school graduate (28%) Not an independent school graduate (72%) Other (5%) Ph.D./Doctoral degree (8%) Master’s degree (61%) Post graduate study without degree (11%) 4-Year college/university degree (15%) 2-Year college degree (1%)
  15. 15. Tenure at Current School and as Diversity Practitioner June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 20. How many years have you actively been employed by your current school? 14. For how many years have you worked as a diversity practitioner? Up to 1 year (10%) 1 - 3 years (13%) 4 - 6 years (27%) 7 - 9 years (11%) 10 - 15 years (26%) 16 or more years (11%) N/A (1%) Up to 1 year (8%) 1 - 3 years (28%) 4 - 6 years (28%) 7 - 9 years (21%) 10 - 15 years (11%) 16 or more years (5%)
  16. 16. Status of Position and of Diversity Role June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 21. Is your position at your school...  22. Is your role as your school's diversity practitioner... Full time (86%) Part time (9%) Other (5%) Full time (34%) Part time (41%) Other (24%)
  17. 17. Acquisition of Diversity Role June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 23. Which of the following statements best describes how you acquired the position of diversity practitioner at your school?   Actively sought the position (44%) Asked to take on the position (56%)
  18. 18. Tenure of Diversity Position and Number Holding Diversity Title June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 24. How long has the role of director or dean of diversity (or an equivalent title) existed at your school?  25. Over that time period, do you know how many people have held the position of director of diversity or its equivalent at your school? 26. In total, how many people, including yourself, have held the position of director or dean of diversity (or an equivalent title) at your school?   * 90% knew the answer to this question Less than 1 year (10%) Between 1 and 5 years (34%) Between 5 and 10 years (29%) Between 10 and 20 years (18%) More than 20 years (3%) Don't know (7%) Number of People Holding Diversity Title (including themselves)* Total One only 46% Two 22% Three 16% Four 11% Five 2% Six 3% Average number 2.1
  19. 19. Specific Training June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 16. What specific training have you received as part of your diversity practice? If there is training you've received that is not on this list, you'll have the opportunity to describe that training in the next question. When asked what other forms of training they have received, the most frequent mentions are of PoCC and SEED.
  20. 20. What Does “Diversity” Mean to Practitioners? <ul><li>When defining “diversity,” most practitioners start with the basic definition of “differences between people” but then extend that to mean opening people’s minds to the diversity of others and creating a comfortable, safe, and inclusive environment where differences are appreciated and celebrated. Many practitioners also include a practical component when defining diversity, in the sense of having specific goals for diversifying their school’s students, faculty, administrators, and/or staff. </li></ul><ul><li>Some practitioners make a distinction between “diversity,” which they see as a condition or a quantitative measure, and “multiculturalism,” which they define as the longer-term goal of acceptance and appreciation of others. </li></ul><ul><li>The strongest emotions practitioners associate with diversity work are compassion (85%), optimism (73%), and acceptance (70%), followed by enthusiasm and disappointment (both 59%). About half associate exasperation, satisfaction, surprise, and irritation with diversity, meaning that there is a mix of both positive and negative associations. In contrast, very few associate humiliation, elation, or despair with this work. </li></ul><ul><li>Continuing on a similar theme, almost all practitioners agree that the work is challenging (96% agree strongly or somewhat) and gives them an opportunity to help others (97%). They also see it as letting them strive for goals they value (84%) and making good use of their abilities and skills (also 84%). Three-quarters believe that their diversity work matches their school’s mission statement, although just seven-in-10 agree that it aligns with their head’s vision for the school. </li></ul><ul><li>At the same time, however, more than eight-in-10 find the work stressful and only six-in-10 believe it is respected, which highlight potential barriers to full satisfaction with the work. In fact, just 55 percent find the work extremely or somewhat satisfying and there is definite room for improvement on this measure. The most satisfying aspects include doing the work, getting positive feedback, and seeing change come about. The least satisfying aspects include a lack of commitment and/or resistance to the work from other members of the school, the slowness of change, the need to juggle diversity work with other responsibilities, and the feeling that there is not enough time to achieve what needs to be achieved. </li></ul>June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report
  21. 21. The Meaning of Diversity <ul><li>“ Different Individuals Valuing Each Other Regardless of Skin Intelligence Talent or Years [DIVERSITY]. The definition has to be inclusive of all people ; otherwise the conversation won't be productive. I do not deny that we need to give more airtime to the needs of the oppressed (people of color, women, gays, non-Christians) and that, at times, we need conversations without the majority.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ In the context of my job, I define diversity as any characteristic that is not part of the dominant culture within our school community. My objectives are to help create a school culture where everyone feels accepted, to act as an advocate for diverse individuals or groups when there is conflict, and to educate the community as a whole to thoughtfully consider issues of diversity locally and globally.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Diversity is the practice of inclusion, pluralism, and social justice. In our school, we are working to get the administrative team to act on and invest in, to the degree necessary, to be positive ambassadors of the diversity components our strategic goals. I find myself constantly referring to the students and their concerns in order to ground the arguments for promotion of diversity, to put a real face on the issues.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Diversity is defined by a mixture of unique talents, cultures, languages, backgrounds, socio-economic differences, religious differences, and cultural differences that come together. It is these rich similarities and differences that help us to not only appreciate each other, but to also realize our unique talents and to strengthen (our team, our institution, etc). Personally, I would like my institution to be more broad -sweeping in its definition of diversity. To date, many administrators and the head of school define diversity by ‘African American students’. How sad, and uneducated to think of this is the only caveat that defines diversity.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Our diversity mission statement sums it up: (School name) is committed to fostering a community that honors the diversity of the human experience. We are devoted to cultivating and sustaining a safe environment that empowers individuals and groups to discover and celebrate their identity. We believe race, ethnicity, different religions, culture, national origin, gender, sexual orientation, age, ability, and socioeconomic status to be examples of what constitutes diversity in our community. Through personal and corporate innovation, affirmation, and education we strive to build and support an open and inclusive community dedicated to the principle of respect. Ultimately, we are ever mindful of our call to be decent, loving, and responsible human beings.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ I define diversity using the Big 8 as a guide. I have found that by using the Big 8, more people understand the true depth of diversity. At my school, I am trying to work on improving the foundational processes that create inequity--admissions, hiring, curriculum development and cultural competency of the faculty. We have developed a strategic plan for diversity around these areas.” </li></ul>June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report
  22. 22. Emotions Associated with Diversity Work June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 10. Which of the following emotions do you associate most strongly with your work as a diversity practitioner?
  23. 23. Diversity Work Profile June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 11. How much do you agree or disagree that each of the following describes the diversity work that you do?
  24. 24. Satisfaction with Diversity Work June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 7. How satisfying do you find your work as a diversity practitioner? Extremely satisfying (17%) Very satisfying (38%) Somewhat satisfying (38%) Not very satisfying (5%) Not at all satisfying (2%)
  25. 25. Most Satisfying Aspect <ul><li>“ I love to watch the ‘light bulb’ turn on in our students.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ By providing my fellow coworkers with awareness, they consider the importance of diversity in their everyday teaching and existence. After attending SDI, our school started ‘home groups’ to discuss issues and topics of diversity - very powerful! The praise and compliments we receive about the use of home groups and the diversity work make my job very satisfying.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Actually reaching people, knowing that I can make a real difference in how teachers treat their students, and in the way students think about themselves. Hearing students say that they have learned a lot 'about life' from me makes it all worthwhile.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Seeing my school move along the continuum of becoming a truly inclusive multicultural school and knowing my hard work and effort contributes to that movement. In addition, witnessing the level growth and sense of belonging of our students of color at our school.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ When we have programs dedicated to a specific diversity topic and I get feedback about the new things people learned and I have people interested in joining a cause. When stereotypes are dispelled and service projects are created.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ As a white person in the role of diversity coordinator, I enjoy sharing with my colleagues who are mostly white, issues that our students of color face despite their ‘being open’ and ‘accepting’. I like to teach the teachers and offer our students of color mentors from our community who can address their specific issues.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ The opportunity to challenge student thinking about diversity issues...and then having them become more open-minded in empathizing with other perspectives that they never considered before. Additionally, helping to support opportunities for students to increase pride in and self-awareness about their cultural heritage.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ I enjoy working with all types of people and hearing their stories and experiences, whether good or bad. It allows you to see an issue or topic from another person's perspective. That helps you grow as you try and implement programs to suit the entire community from parents, students, and staff.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ I lead our high school diversity club. The conversation and leadership skills that come out of this group astound me. We meet in my classroom once a week and then they go out into our little community and spread the message through their actions (in everything from formal presentations to subtle comments in the hallways.) Their personal growth and exemplary behavior has been phenomenal to nurture and witness.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ I enjoy it when the students here learn from one another's cultures. I love hearing when students recognize that ‘we aren't so different after all.’ I also really enjoy when the kids do something on campus that is received well or is successful.” </li></ul>June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report
  26. 26. Least Satisfying Aspect <ul><li>“ I think what is least satisfying about my work as a diversity practitioner is the fact that there are members within my community who truly do not understand that ‘diversity’ is not something that we can check off as being complete. Some people believe that since we have someone in my position, that there is no need to continue learning and moving forward in this area. At times, it makes the work harder...like pushing a rock up a hill only to have it roll back down again.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ The ambiguity of the role and the lack of enthusiasm among faculty to focus on this part of the school program.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Dealing with faculty, administrators, and students that are not supportive of diversity initiatives. Also, the lack of support in putting some activities together....a lot of it is done by myself and it a lot of work and hours that don't necessarily get recognized.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Isolating, emotionally taxing, incredibly heavy work load without FT staff support.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Trying to change old views and customs is sometimes slow and frustrating work. Also, coming up with ideas and having to go through all the administrative channels to see it crystallize.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Feeling like the work is never done...” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Nebulous nature of the ‘commitment’ to diversity of the institution. The feeling that there exists a glass ceiling as such to the work that I do.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ The work is never-ending – there is never 100 percent satisfaction – change is slow to happen – I always feel as if I am letting someone down…”. </li></ul><ul><li>“ Having people gripe at me and ask things like, ‘Why are we doing this?’ Seeing my school take two steps forward and one step back. The lack of a clear commitment to diversity initiatives.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Dealing with those who are not open-minded is the least satisfying part of my job.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ There is always more to do than can be done in the time allotted. Also, not everyone sees him or herself as part of the team necessary to make change happen. Sometimes people see me as the change agent instead of themselves as important change agents, too. This is the work of all of us, not just the director.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ The pace of movement/progress is often unsatisfactory to me.” </li></ul>June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report
  27. 27. What Do Diversity Practitioners Do? June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report
  28. 28. What Do Diversity Practitioners Do? <ul><li>Diversity practitioners clearly have a wide range of duties, with at least three-quarters responsible for planning or overseeing diversity programs (84%), consulting on diversity-related problems (82%), serving on their school’s diversity committee (80%), supporting multicultural education (78%), interacting with other administrators on diversity initiatives (76%), speaking about diversity (76%) and supporting all school groups that fall under the diversity umbrella (75%). </li></ul><ul><li>The activities that they spend the most time on include planning diversity events, being in meetings, raising awareness, and reminding people of the importance of diversity and counseling. On the other hand, almost four-in-10 practitioners spend no time at all on student or faculty recruitment. </li></ul><ul><li>Consistent with some of the frustrations expressed about this work, there is a lack of definition in the duties and responsibilities of diversity practice. Just three-in-10 (29%) agree that these are extremely or very well defined, while they are just somewhat well defined for almost four-in-10 (37%) and inadequately defined for a similar proportion of practitioners (34%). Although their role as a diversity practitioner in their school is part of a formal job description for about six-in-10 practitioners (62%), there is a clear opportunity to provide greater clarity in what duties and responsibilities should be part of those job descriptions. </li></ul><ul><li>On average, there are five people per school (including the diversity practitioner) directly responsible for implementing diversity policies and practices. However, almost seven-in-10 practitioners have no direct reports to help them with the work. Two-thirds of diversity practitioners report that they have budget responsibilities, with the annual budgets falling primarily within the $5,000 to $20,000 range. </li></ul><ul><li>The most frequent type of events held in support of diversity and inclusion are assemblies (76%), guest speakers (75%), diversity club meetings (71%) and celebrations of heritage (69%). About half of all schools hold separate upper school, middle school, and lower school events, Days of Silence, and training workshops. However, many other school events generate higher levels of enthusiasm than do diversity events, although those in favor of globalism, sustainability, and other assemblies prompt about the same enthusiasm. </li></ul>June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report
  29. 29. Duties & Responsibilities June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 5. What are your duties and responsibilities as your school's diversity practitioner?
  30. 30. Breakdown of Time Spent on Activities June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 34. In an average month, as it relates to your diversity work, approximately how much time do you spend...    
  31. 31. Job Definition June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 4. How well defined are your duties and responsibilities as your school’s diversity practitioner? Extremely well defined (8%) Very well defined (21%) Somewhat well defined (37%) Not well defined (22%) Not defined at all (12%)
  32. 32. Role Type June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 6. For you personally, is your role as a diversity practitioner in your school...?
  33. 33. Number Responsible for Implementing Diversity June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 28. Including yourself, how many people at your school are directly responsible for implementing diversity policies and practices?     When asked what roles and responsibilities these people have, the most frequent mentions are the school head, various division heads, deans and directors, faculty members and both diversity directors and coordinators One person (27%) 2 people (18%) 3 people (9%) 4 people (8%) Between 5 and 9 people (25%) 10 or more people (13%)
  34. 34. Number of Direct Reports June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 39. How many peopled in your school report to you directly in relation to your diversity work specifically?  Number of Direct Reports Total None 68% One 6% Two 7% Three 4% Four 4% Five 4% Six or more 7%
  35. 35. Budget Responsibilities and Annual Budget June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 37. Do you have budgetary responsibilities as part of your work as a diversity practitioner? 38. What is your annual budget for diversity initiatives in your school?     Yes (65%) No (35%) Annual Budget Total $5,000 or less 14% More than $5,000 up to $10,000 26% More than $10,000 up to $20,000 35% More than $20,000 up to $30,000 14% More than $30,000 10%
  36. 36. Type of Diversity Events June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 49. Over the course of the school year, what events do you and/or your school's diversity committee hold in support of diversity and inclusion?   
  37. 37. Comparison of Events June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 50. How would you compare reactions to the events that you stage for diversity purposes to the other following types of school events?   
  38. 38. Comparison of Events June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 50. How would you compare reactions to the events that you stage for diversity purposes to the other following types of school events?   
  39. 39. What is the Role of Diversity in Independent Schools? June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report
  40. 40. What is the Role of Diversity in Independent Schools? <ul><li>Although three-quarters of schools currently have a formal diversity committee or council, only half have prepared a formal strategic diversity plan. In fact, the presence of a formal plan is correlated with job definition, in that the practitioners in schools with formal plans are more likely to agree that their roles and responsibilities are clearly defined. </li></ul><ul><li>Consistent with the frustrations expressed, diversity practitioners do not perceive an especially high level of support or recognition from other constituencies at their schools. Almost seven-in-10 receive support from students and six-in-10 get support from the head and other administrators or directors. However, only half get support from faculty, just four-in-10 believe they are supported by either staff or parents/guardians, only one-quarter feel supported by trustees, and fewer than one-in-five believe their work is supported by alumni. The degree to which they feel these constituencies value their diversity work are at about the same levels. </li></ul><ul><li>Continuing a similar theme, diversity and inclusivity appear to have made some inroads into school mission statements (66%), admissions (65%), and school marketing (53%) but not in other key areas, such as hiring decision for either faculty (30%) or staff (22%), classroom discussions (33%), curriculum development (28%) or board decisions (14%). Two-thirds of practitioners feel that they have personally contributed to progress in diversity and inclusion at their schools, while almost three-in-10 feel they have only made some progress and 7 percent do not feel they have yet made a contribution. </li></ul><ul><li>For those who have made an impact, the main areas are in awareness of the topic and acknowledgment of its importance. Comparing the areas that practitioners have influenced with their presence in their schools shows the biggest gaps to be in parent relations, classroom discussions, and curriculum development. It appears that, despite the efforts practitioners are making in these areas, they are seeing little progress in return. In contrast, it is worth noting that schools appear to have incorporated diversity into their mission statements without the direct intervention of diversity practitioners. </li></ul>June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report
  41. 41. What is the Role of Diversity in Independent Schools? <ul><li>Diversity practitioners perceive themselves highly on many diversity-related characteristics, such as treating everyone with respect (94% rate themselves between 8 and 10 on a 0-10 scale), being committed to ethical values and character development (89%) and fostering an atmosphere of inclusiveness (88%). However, they do not rate themselves as highly on making consistent progress to build an inclusive school community (68%), avoiding exclusive focus on specific groups or types of people (71%), taking action to create and sustain a diverse enrollment (62%), or providing multicultural learning experiences for all students (53%). </li></ul><ul><li>Overall, they have much weaker perceptions of their school’s rating on these same dimensions. About six-in-10 agree that their schools are committed to ethical values and character development and creating a caring community environment. Half see their schools treating everyone with respect, emphasizing acceptance and appreciation of the differences of others, as well as making consistent progress in building and maintaining an inclusive school community. Only about four-in-10 agree that their schools are fostering an atmosphere of inclusiveness, allow all opinions to be heard and considered, are committed to positive change relating to diversity, avoid exclusive focus on specific groups or types of people, and are taking action to create and sustain a diverse and inclusive enrollment. Only three-in-10 believe that their schools are actively anti-racists or committed to providing multicultural learning experiences for all students. </li></ul><ul><li>The overall theme is that, although their schools have committed to taking action on diversity, practitioners are finding a lot of resistance when it comes to turning that commitment into concrete action. As a result, they see little success so far achieving goals of equity, justice, and inclusivity relating to admission of students (just 42%), gender (44%), class (26%), sexual orientation (26%), race (24%), ability/disability (14%), or the hiring of faculty (11%). On a similar note, although parents’ associations are active in more than eight-in-10 schools, only four-in-10 schools have active racial/ethnic/diversity student affinity groups and even fewer schools have more specialized affinity groups. </li></ul><ul><li>Finally, although three-quarters of practitioners receive performance reviews, just four-in-10 report that their diversity work had a very great or great degree of influence in their most recent review. </li></ul>June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report
  42. 42. Diversity Program Description June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 27. Which of the following best describes your school?   
  43. 43. Formal Diversity Plan June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 44. Have you and/or your school prepared a formal strategic diversity plan? Yes (48%) No (52%) Job Definition Have Plan No Plan TOP 2 40% 21% Extremely well defined 12% 3% Very well defined 28% 18% Somewhat well defined 43% 30% Not well defined 12% 33% Not defined at all 6% 16%
  44. 44. Support Received June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 45. How much support do you receive from the following constituencies when working on diversity and multicultural initiatives?  
  45. 45. Efforts Valued June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 46. To what degree to you feel each of these constituencies value the work you are doing as a diversity practitioner?  
  46. 46. Degree that Diversity is Present June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 31. Thinking only of the school where you currently work, to what degree are diversity and inclusivity included in...  
  47. 47. Degree that Diversity is Present June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 31. Thinking only of the school where you currently work, to what degree are diversity and inclusivity included in...  
  48. 48. Degree of Personal Contribution to Diversity June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 32. To what degree do you feel you have contributed to progress at your school in the areas of diversity and inclusion?     To a very great degree (28%) To a great degree (38%) To some degree (28%) To a very little degree (6%) To no degree at all (1%)
  49. 49. Areas of Influence June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 33. Which of the following have you been able to affect?    
  50. 50. Gap Between Presence and Influence June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report Presence at School Influence by Practitioner Gap Mission statement 66% 26% +40 Admissions 65% 51% +14 School marketing 53% 39% +14 Classroom discussions 33% 65% -32 Faculty hiring decisions 30% 47% -17 Curriculum development 28% 51% -23 Extracurricular activities 26% 34% -8 College counseling 25% 15% +10 Athletics 24% 10% +14 Policy setting 23% 28% -5 Staff hiring decisions 22% 20% +2 Administration hiring decisions 19% 24% -5 Board recruitment 18% 19% -1 Parent relations and activities 18% 57% -39 Board decisions 14% 18% -4 School development/fundraising 11% 13% -2
  51. 51. Self Rating June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 48. And how would you rate yourself on these same dimensions?
  52. 52. Self Rating June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 48. And how would you rate yourself on these same dimensions?
  53. 53. Rating School Culture June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 47. On a scale of 0 to 10, where &quot;0&quot; means &quot;poor&quot; and &quot;10&quot; means &quot;excellent,&quot; how would you rate the culture of your school in terms of ...   
  54. 54. Rating School Culture June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 47. On a scale of 0 to 10, where &quot;0&quot; means &quot;poor&quot; and &quot;10&quot; means &quot;excellent,&quot; how would you rate the culture of your school in terms of ...   
  55. 55. Rating School’s Goals June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 57. On a scale of 0 to 10, where &quot;0&quot; means &quot;poor&quot; and &quot;10&quot; means &quot;excellent,&quot; how well does your school achieve goals related to equity, justice, and inclusivity on the following dimensions:
  56. 56. Active School Groups June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 51. How active are the following groups at your school?    
  57. 57. Active School Groups June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 51. How active are the following groups at your school?    
  58. 58. Reporting Structure for Diversity Practitioners June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 36. Who do you report to specifically for your work as your school's diversity practitioner?   
  59. 59. Staff Evaluations June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 40. Does your school conduct formal evaluations of its staff members?  Yes (75%) No (25%)
  60. 60. Most Recent Evaluation June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 41. When was your most recent evaluation? 
  61. 61. Responsibility for Most Recent Evaluation June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 42. Who conducted your most recent evaluation? 
  62. 62. Role of Diversity Work in Most Recent Evaluation June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 43. To what degree did your work as your school's diversity practitioner play a part in your most recent evaluation?  To a very great degree (33%) To a great degree (6%) To some degree (18%) To a very little degree (10%) To no degree at all (32%)
  63. 63. What Do Diversity Practitioners Need, Now and into the Future? June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report
  64. 64. What Do Diversity Practitioners Need, Now and into the Future? <ul><li>Over the years, the role played by many diversity practitioners has evolved in a variety of different ways. For some, their duties and responsibilities have grown as diversity work has become more formalized and central to their careers (“1. Gone from part-time to fulltime, 2. Moved up the institutional hierarchy in the core administrative leadership team”/“My role has become a permanent part of our institution”) while, for others, their understanding of the field has deepened and their goals for change have become more ambitious (“My role has become more about action and less about talk.”/“I have grown in my own understanding, in my goals and in my practices.”) </li></ul><ul><li>In contrast, other diversity practitioners feel that they have “stalled” or that the demands on them have increased but without a corresponding increase in recognition, title, or compensation (“More responsibilities, more stress, same money, same visibility.”/“Much more responsibility, less time and less pay.”) For some of these practitioners, the school’s commitment to diversity has not turned out to be as strong as anticipated (“When I started, there was a lot of enthusiasm; however, the realization that the school is not even close to where it purports to be, it became even more uncomfortable.”/“Diversity seems to be important, but not that important.”) </li></ul><ul><li>The main sources of mentoring that diversity practitioners have received in the past include prior holders of their position, their supervisors, peers, colleagues and fellow practitioners, as well as NAIS personnel. However, it seems that about one-in-three practitioners have not received any mentoring, which likely represents an opportunity for improvement within the field (“I have not received any mentoring, and would love more information on professionals who are willing to work with other professionals.”) </li></ul><ul><li>The mentoring that diversity practitioners provide is mainly to students and faculty individually, especially new faculty members, as well as assisting student diversity groups. Many practitioners also give support to their colleagues in other schools (“I try to be available to assist other practitioners when requested. I especially like to reach out to new practitioners. I will take the lead when possible in coordinating collaborative efforts.”) </li></ul>June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report
  65. 65. What Do Diversity Practitioners Need, Now and into the Future? <ul><li>In terms of current office arrangements, just four-in-10 practitioners describe their offices as being extremely or very visible/accessible to the school community. When asked what changes they would like to see, some practitioners would simply like to have an office, while others are looking for more space, privacy, and visibility (“I would get it out of the cafeteria/basement level and have a larger space to hold small meetings for students/parents/faculty and more space for resources”). </li></ul><ul><li>The most immediate needs of diversity practitioners relate to support, both in terms of increased commitment from, and validation for, their work from their schools and additional resources to help them carry out the work. They are looking for assistance to carry out the work and funding for training, professional development, and mentoring. Some want their roles clarified and formalized and others want help developing a strategic plan for diversity. Longer term needs focus even more strongly on the need for a strategic plan and dedicated resources to diversity, with some even looking forward to the time when schools “ultimately do not have a need for a diversity practitioner.” </li></ul><ul><li>Continuing to look to the future, many practitioners believe that, if they were to leave their school, the school would hire a new person to replace them. However, it is notable that about one-in-four practitioners are not sure that they would be replaced (“I doubt the position would be filled but I do believe there would be others who would ‘carry the torch’ and take on bits and pieces of my position”), which is further evidence of the perceived ambivalence about the value of diversity work on the part of some independent schools. </li></ul><ul><li>When asked to describe their longer-term career plans and the anticipated role that diversity will play in their plans, many practitioners plan to either stay in the field of diversity or expect that their diversity experience will continue to influence the work that they do. However, when asked to assess to what degree their diversity work is preparing them to meet those career goals, the results are somewhat mixed. About three-in-10 each believe that this work is contributing to a very great degree (27%), to a great degree (32%) or to some degree (28%) to their career plans. Ideally, diversity practitioners should be somewhat more enthusiastic that their diversity work is providing a strong foundation for their future career aspirations. </li></ul>June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report
  66. 66. Visibility/Accessibility of Office June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 52. How physically visible/accessible is your office to the rest of the school community?     Extremely (22%) Very (17%) Somewhat (34%) Not very (24%) Not at all (3%)
  67. 67. Most Immediate Needs <ul><li>“ To have our institution be more encompassing and inclusive, and thoughtfully match action steps to our long-range plan. Our long-range plans include many goals for diversity, and yet many of those in charge of the development of these goals are short-sited. It is difficult to be a practitioner, but not be included in the valuable and necessary conversations. I am left uninvited.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ For our school to create a diversity statement that is clear and supportive of our school's mission and to publicize it on the web and in our literature.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ A strategic plan that is the outcome of a collaborated effort on the part of the head, trustee board, directors, faculty/staff, and parents.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Clear job description for my position, clearer idea of the head's and board's commitment to this work, diversity director to coordinate the initiatives and lighter teaching load to be able to better do the job.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ I would like further training and have the opportunity to learn more about helping students.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Resources, monetary and otherwise, to accomplish diversity planning goals.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Leadership beyond lip service from the board and certain top administrators.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Recognition and appreciation of the role that I am employed to play in the school by members of the school administration.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ 1. Buy-in from head of school, division heads, and board of trustees (which would in turn affect the faculty, parents, and students) 2. Education about white privilege 3. Complete financial aid program that does not exclude students from the social and co-curricular fabric of the school.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Time, support, direction.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ True devotion to what we claim is our mission by making a full-time position so that someone can do what we claim we will do--rather than force people to do it ‘on the side’.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Training, training, training. Diversity practitioners need to be versed in what I call the ‘language of diversity.’ We need resources and to be aware of the latest research and studies about disenfranchised groups to better support them within the dominant culture. This requires attendance at workshops and conferences. We also need allies in all constituents of the school, parents/students/faculty/staff/admin/board, and this requires training of the community to build these allies. As a diversity practitioner of color, I must be refreshed and rejuvenated by attending PoCC.” </li></ul>June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report
  68. 68. Longer-Term Needs <ul><li>“ Working towards ensuring that there is equity in the treatment of students from socio-economic, racial, language, sexual orientation, and religious minorities.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ School-wide commitment to diversity. Not philosophically but actual time commitment. I would like to be able to participate in the admissions process, the hiring process, and the curriculum committee. So this point would be inclusion in those processes.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ A consistent methodology for injecting the curriculum with components of curriculum that encourage discussion, reading, and understanding the changing culture that we live in.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Direction: I think it is imperative for schools to understand that diversity is bigger than saying we want it; it is a way of thinking and adjusting our culture. Devising a plan that is bigger than programs and workshops, but about who we are as an institution.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Opportunities to have a supervisory role within the school. Diversity directors can be a one-track career that leads to no- where because many of us do not supervise faculty, only facilitate discussions. In this position, we lack the opportunity to move into other admin positions (division head, assistant head of school, etc) because the position of diversity director is limited.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ To develop a strategic plan for the school for diversity and for the school to consider more deeply how it teaches diversity.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ To make the campus more diverse (culturally, racially) in order to reflect the ratio in the local population. My goal is to help make the graduating students well-rounded, world-ready, and globally aware individuals who are able to interact with people from all backgrounds and cultures.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Buy-in from faculty and parents on the need for and benefits of a diverse school and a multi-perspective curriculum.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ We need to change the current structure on how things have been done in the past---- hiring, admitting students, parent meetings. Formally put in a structure that supports diversity.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Administrators to hold faculty accountable, with an expectation that all will be engaging in the multicultural practices identified by the school to be important. Funds to support more racial diversity within the school and to support those at the school in community experience. Competitive salary.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ A clearly defined strategic plan that includes leadership commitment, vehicles for support, and assurance of accountability.” </li></ul>June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report
  69. 69. Career Plans and Diversity Work <ul><li>“ My plans within the next five years are to see diversity grow within my current position. In addition, I would like to see the global studies curriculum unfold.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ I am currently earning my Ed.D. and I will leave my school in two years to pursue a career in teaching teachers - diversity will play a huge role.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ I would love to have an official role as diversity director with support. I may also look at a division head job.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ I am striving to be a dean of students at a college or university. I believe that diversity will always play a major role in my plans as I recruit and hire staff; support the work and mission of the institution where I choose to work and support the development of young learners and future leaders. I am also open to the role of division head in a school and believe diversity is an integral part of any educational community at all levels. It is not the work of one individual or one department.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Within the next five years, I would like to be a division head, preferably in the lower School. I believe that diversity will be important in my next plans because it builds awareness of how to create a community where every child feels that he/she can succeed.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Having done diversity-specific work (both part-and-full time) for 20 years now at both the college and independent school levels, I hope to venture into a more general school administrative role, in which I could touch on more areas of a school but still support diversity initiatives and efforts.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Continue to develop proficiency in diversity/multicultural skills and develop consultant business.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ I plan on still playing a large role in diversity efforts at the school, but hope to play a larger role in enrollment and admissions planning.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Diversity will always play a role in my future career choices. I hope to remain in this role for another five years because I've only touched the tip of the iceberg. After that, I hope to move into lower school assistant head or lower school head.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ I will be a division head next year. My work in diversity will only continue in a different venue!” </li></ul><ul><li>“ I see myself as first and foremost a diversity practitioner. I plan to stay at this school if possible to continue building the office of diversity and its programs and initiatives. I love my school environment and the opportunities for and reception to change are pretty abundant, particularly relative to my colleagues at other schools.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Eventually, I would like to be head of a division to oversee and implement the goals that I am beginning in my current position. I think the role of diversity practitioner will continue to be stigmatized for many years to come.” </li></ul>June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report
  70. 70. Diversity Work as Preparation Toward Career Goals June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 55. To what degree is your current work as a diversity practitioner helping you prepare to meet those career goals?   To a very great degree (27%) To a great degree (32%) To some degree (28%) To a very little degree (8%) To no degree at all (5%)
  71. 71. Which Type of Schools Support Diversity Work? June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report
  72. 72. Which Types of Schools Support Diversity Work? <ul><li>The profile of the schools at which diversity practitioners work shows some distinct characteristics: </li></ul><ul><li>85 percent are day schools, which is similar to the overall NAIS result of 81 percent among member schools. </li></ul><ul><li>The schools tend to be larger overall, as 30 percent have between 501 and 700 students and almost four-in-10 have more than 700 students. This is much larger than the distribution of all NAIS member schools. </li></ul><ul><li>These schools have long histories, as 84 percent have been in existence for at least 50 years. </li></ul><ul><li>More than eight-in-10 are co-educational, which is consistent with NAIS member schools. </li></ul><ul><li>They are located throughout the U.S., although with a skew to the Middle Atlantic region (23%) and less so in the Southwest (8%). </li></ul><ul><li>Seven-in-10 support Grades 6-8 (70%) and 9-12 (71%), while six-in-ten support PreK-K (56%) and Grades 1-5 (59%). Just 6 percent have PG classes. </li></ul><ul><li>Almost all (98%) are members of NAIS, although just 15 percent have completed the AIM program. However, just 4 percent of all NAIS schools have completed AIM, so this result among diversity practitioners is higher than the average. </li></ul>June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report
  73. 73. Type of School June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 65. Which of the following school types best describes your school?     All NAIS Schools Day schools = 81%
  74. 74. School Size June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 66. Approximately how many students are enrolled in your school?     All NAIS Schools 21% 18% 26% 15% 21%
  75. 75. Age of School June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 69. For how many years has your school been in existence?    
  76. 76. Gender Orientation June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 67. Does your school have a particular gender orientation?     Girls (14%) Boys (3%) Co-ed (83%) All NAIS Schools 7% 7% 86%
  77. 77. School Location June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 70. Where is your school located?    
  78. 78. Grades Supported June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 68. What grades do your school support? Please check all that apply either fully or partially.    
  79. 79. NAIS Membership June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 63. Is your school where you work...   
  80. 80. Completion of AIM Program June 2009 Insightlink Communications Analysis Report 64. Has your school completed the NAIS Assessment of Inclusivity and Multiculturalism (AIM) program?     Yes (15%) No (85%) All NAIS Schools 4% 96%

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