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PK Meiosis Project

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  • 1. I.M.F. INTERNATIONAL MEIOSIS FORCE
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  • 3. Meiosis
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  • 15. Meiosis! Meiosis begins with one diploid cell containing two copies of each chromosome— one from the organism's mother and one from its father—and produces four haploid cells containing one copy of each chromosome. Each of the resulting chromosomes in the gamete cells is a unique mixture of maternal and paternal DNA, ensuring that offspring are genetically distinct from either parent. This gives rise to genetic diversity in sexually reproducing populations, which provides the variation of physical and behavioural attributes (phenotypes) upon which natural selection acts, at a population level, leading to adaptation within the population, resulting in evolution. Prior to the meiosis process the cell's chromosomes are duplicated by a round of DNA replication, creating a maternal and paternal version of each chromosome (homologs) composed of two exact copies, sister chromatids, attached at the centromere region. In the beginning of meiosis the maternal and paternal homologs pair to each other. Then they typically exchange parts by homologous recombination leading to crossovers of DNA between the maternal and paternal versions of the chromosome. Spindle fibers bind to the centromeres of each pair of homologs and arrange the pairs at the spindle equator. Then the fibers pull the recombined homologs to opposite poles of the cell. As the chromosomes move away from the center the cell divides into two daughter cells, each containing a haploid number of chromosomes composed of two chromatids. How’s your eyesight? Are you as bored listening to this as I am reading it? I’ve learned absolutely nothing about this topic because I’ve just cut and pasted this in from Wikipedia. Could you tell?
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  • 19. References/Photo Credits Slide 1: allyouneedismovies.com Slide 2: hecklerspray.com, movies.yahoo.com Slide 3: images.brighthub.com Slide 4: author’s own, listal.com, cinematicpassions.wordpress.com Slide 5: tagxedo.com Slide 6: flippinsweetgear.com Slide 7: palaeobabbler.blogspot.com/2010_07_01_archive.html Slide 8: en.wikipedia.com, tower.com, freemp3down.com Slide 9: geneticsuite.net
  • 20. Slide 10 : www.uic.edu/classes/bios/bios100/lecturesf04am/lect16.htm Slide 11 : politedissent.com Slide 12: collingwoodfc.com.au Slide 13: logo – meyermillersmith.com Left pic - briodaily.com Right pic – blog.sonicfoundry.com Slide 14: maastricht.ning.com/forum/topics/pecha-kucha-night-maastricht Slide 15: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meiosis Slide 16:enlightenednook.wordpress.com, uncommonsense101.files.wordpress.com, misssophiemac.blogspot.com Slide 17: mikewiniski.com Slide 18: tvtropes.com

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