Ohassta 2013 historical thinking
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Ohassta 2013 historical thinking

on

  • 342 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
342
Views on SlideShare
335
Embed Views
7

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0

1 Embed 7

https://twitter.com 7

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Ohassta 2013 historical thinking Ohassta 2013 historical thinking Presentation Transcript

    • Historical Thinking: how do you teach it, how do you assess it? •How can teachers evaluate their students’ use of the historical thinking concepts? •How can teachers manage their time to teach these concepts as well as the historical content? •We will discuss good, better, and best use of these concepts through hands-on classroom ready activities, to help teachers begin to incorporate and evaluate student success.
    • What are Concepts and How do they Work?
    • Why Metacognition? • How do they help students control their learning? • What happens when we don't pay attention to it? • Assessing and evaluating student use of the historical thinking concepts
    • What does research tell us about the ideas that students bring to the classroom? “Students come to the classroom with preconceptions… If their initial understanding is not engaged they may fail to grasp the new concepts and information that they are taught…” (The first principle of: How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School. National Research Council, 2000, Washington DC.)
    • Ros Ashby asked Students to think about Primary Sources •“How did the painter know they were dressed like that?” source 1 •“How did the painter know what the landing of the pilgrams looked like, if he was not there?” •“In source 2 it looks like the arrive at day but source 1 it looks like they arrive at night?” source 2 •“How did they know what the Mayflower looked like and how bad or good the weather was?” •“How did the artist know what the Mayflower looked like because he drew
    • Problem: all responses reveal that the students see the Primary Sources (paintings) as testimony Challenge: move students to think about the Primary Sources as Evidence of the changing significance of the Mayflower
    • Teacher reads out a student’s reflection and asks for class response • “I think the Indians are in the picture to show they were there first” • “Art isn’t always total fact it’s usually symbolism… that these Native Americans are here first and it’s not really the Pilgrims land at all”
    • Teacher asks, “what would we need to know to interpret the painting?” • “What period of time it was painted and whereabouts it was painted. They could be changed with society, like giving into [predominant ideas] because like most people…were white, so he wanted to paint the white people as great… ”
    • Student Preconceptions of Historical Thinking Concepts • Students were taught to apply the concept of Significance in Heritage Fair projects • Often other historical thinking concepts appeared to be involved in student responses to questions even though they were not explicitly taught the concepts • Embedded Concepts within Significance: Cause and Consequence; Change and Continuity
    • Significance = Importance TOC 2013 page 130 • Historical importance is determined generally by the impact of something on a group of people and whether its effects are long lasting. • …something that is historically significant for one group may not be significant for another. • Significance may also be determined by the relevance of something from the past, including how it connects to a current issue or event.
    • Cause and Consequence “Fleming’s creation of standard time zones made traveling around the world much easier … He was the reason for bring more immigrants to the prairies” Hw was the main reason for British Columbia to enter Confederation … Fleming had helped Canadians save their electricity bill and resources by turning their clocks an hour forward in the summer”
    • Do you think that Canada would be different if the person/event described in your project did not exist? • “If Laura Secord did not do what she did, Canada may not have electricity because Niagara Falls would have been captured by the Americans.” [Misled by a causal question. The question should have focused on Significance: why does the person/event resonate today?] Why is this topic important to you personally and why should it be important to other people? • “Terry Fox was an important person because he raised money to fight cancer. Because of him we now have cures for certain kinds of cancers. Terry Fox has saved the lives of many children who were dying of cancer.” [No causal question, but student resorts to causal explanation]
    • What aspect of the Concept Significance was used?
    • How do we promote Rich concepts in the New Curriculum? How do we avoid Preconceptions? • • • • • Significance Change and Continuity Cause and Consequence Historical Perspective-Taking Evidence
    • B1. analyse aspects of the lives of various groups in Canada between 1800 and 1850, Framing Questions • What can we learn from the ways in which people met challenges in the past? • Why is it important to consider various perspectives when analysing events or issues? • What types of forces can bring about change? TOC 2013 page 137
    • Cause/Agency/Consequence
    • Traditional: Change and Continuity Then Now
    • [B1. ] and compare them to the lives of people in Canada in 1713–1800 TOC 2013 page 137 Change and Continuity 1713–1800 - Slavery in Canada - Enslaved escaped from Canada to the Northern Free States -British law not enforced in Canada 1800–1850 - What was the turning point that marked the Change? -What continued between periods that slowed change? - Slavery abolished in Canada - Underground Railroad reverses direction going from the U.S. to Canada -Blacks staking rights in Canada
    • B1. assess key similarities and differences between Canada in 1890– 1914 and in the present day, with reference to the experiences of and major challenges facing different groups and/or individuals and to some of the actions Canadians have taken to improve their lives Framing Questions • In what ways are Canadian rights and freedoms a result of the struggles of people in the past? • What are some ways in which different people respond to challenges and create change? • What role has diversity played in the development of Canada? TOC 2013 page 147
    • Cause/Agency/Consequence Head Tax Riots against Chinese mines and Shops Chinese form mutual benefit societies Laws made to restrict Chinese businesses Chinese solicits help from government in China Chinese not allowed to study in professional schools The community forms alliances with Christian churches What role has diversity played in the development of Canada?
    • Primary sources http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/canadiens-chinois/021022-1400-e.html
    • Historical Perspectives The right – hand group as one faces the memorial shows chiefs of the Mohawk, Tuscarora, and Oneida Nations, furnished with the scalping knife, spear, and pipe of peace. The left-hand group shows the Seneca, Onondaga, and Cayuga Natives, with the bow and arrows, war-club, and flintlock gun. The trophies consist of artistic arrangements of their weapons and instruments, including snowshoes and lacrosse sticks. The totems of the Six Nations, the bear, the wolf and the tortoise, are introduced in the memorial, especially at the request of the Indians themselves. http://www.uelac.org/Loyalist “What are some ways in which different people respond to challenges and create change?“ How would FNMI and non-FNMI people see this statue?
    • Historical Perspectives / evidence-based inferences Use historical context to The right – hand group as one faces the memorial shows chiefs of the Mohawk, Tuscarora, and Oneida Nations, furnished with the scalping knife, spear, and pipe of peace. The left-hand group shows the Seneca, Onondaga, and Cayuga Natives, with the bow and arrows, war-club, and flintlock gun. The trophies consist of artistic arrangements of their weapons and instruments, including snowshoes and lacrosse sticks. The totems of the Six Nations, the bear, the wolf and the tortoise, are introduced in the memorial, especially at the request of the Indians themselves. http://www.uelac.org/Loyal ist make inferences on Perspective: What was happening at the time? In 1886, Louis O’soup, Peter Hourie, Mistawasis, Kahkewistahaw, and Atakaoop, a group of chiefs from the Western Prairies were taken East to the unveiling of Brant’s statue. How would FNMI and nonFNMI people see this statue today? How does knowing the context help you understand how both groups may have seen this differently in the past? Create tableaus for each.
    • Primary Source Evidence -Who is the author of the photo -Why was it created? Was the purpose positive or negative? -What is it telling the audience -Who would be the audience and why would they be interested? -How does the source show the Chinese Canadian community in transition? -What values do this source reveal about the Chinese at this time? Contextualize the source: Liang, the Chinese political activist visits a Chinese Community organization in Canada
    • • http://interactivepdf.uniflip.com/2/10582/299582/pub/
    • References • Benchmarks of Historical Thinking is a project of the Centre for the Study of Historical Consciousness, the Historica Foundation, and supported by the Canadian Council on Learning <http://www.historicalthinking.ca> • How Students Learn: History in the Classroom. National Research Council, 2005, Washington DC.) • Counsell, C. (2004) 'Looking through a Josephine-Butlershaped window', Teaching History, 114, Making History Personal Edition (March), The Historical Association.