Meen 442 Journal Final Pdf V2
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Meen 442 Journal Final Pdf V2

on

  • 648 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
648
Views on SlideShare
648
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
15
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Meen 442 Journal Final Pdf V2 Document Transcript

  • 1. MEEN 442 SolidWorksComputer Aided Engineering Journal Completed by: Eric Halfmann Texas A&M University Summer 2011 August 8, 2011
  • 2. Journal AbstractThe purpose of this journal is to present my computer aided engineering (CAE) skills. My abilityto utilize engineering software (in this case SolidWorks) in the aid of design, manufacturing, andsales will be illustrated. These three aspects are important to any engineer and will greatlyenhance my ability to successfully communicate my work and design to customers andmanufacturing personnel. The following journal will show my wide range of SolidWorks graphicskills through the presentation of many different assignments that cover the use of all thedifferent features that SolidWorks has to offer. Engineering drawings per ASME standards willbe developed for some of these parts and some basic Finite Element Analysis will be performedon one of the shafts for the Planetary Gear Reducer. Finally, my ability to utilize SolidWorks asa computer aided engineering software and not just a graphics tool will be presented with thedesign and design analysis of a Planetary Gearbox for a 1 HP 3600 rpm NEMA C Face Motor. 1
  • 3. Table of ContentsJournal Abstract………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 1Table of Contents………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 2List of Figures…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 3List of Tables………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 41. Planetary Gearbox Design Project…………………………………………………………………………………….. 5 Abstract…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 5 Nomenclature…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………6 1.1 Introduction…………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 8 1.2 Design Concept……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 8 1.3 Gear Design……………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 9 1.4 Shaft Force and Stress Analysis……………………………………………………………………………….. 13 1.5 Bearing Design…………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 16 1.6 SolidWorks Modelling……………………………………………………………………………………………… 17 1.7 SolidWorks FEA……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 20 1.8 Future Work…………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 24 1.9 Conclusion……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 25 1.10 References ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 252. Vases………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 263. Google House…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 284. Guide Rod Assembly Plates………………………………………………………………………………………………… 295. Guide Rod Assembly…………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 306. Rotating Crank Assembly……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 317. Basic Gearbox Assembly…………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 318. Basic Gearbox 2D Engineering Drawings…………………………………………………………………………….. 329. Surface Truck……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 3610. Basic Finite Element Analysis (FEA) Using SolidWorks Simulation………………………………………..37Appendix 1: Free Body Diagrams and Hand Calculations of Planetary Gearbox……..………………... 38Appendix 2: Engineering Drawings of Planetary Gearbox Components…………………………………….. 44 2
  • 4. List of FiguresFigure 1: 3D Image of Proposed Planetary Gearbox Design……………………………………………………….. 9Figure 2: Basic Figure of gear meshes and associated forces……………………………………………………… 12Figure 3: Forces on Carrier Arm…………………………………………………………………………………………………. 15Figure 4: Stage 1 and Stage 2 Gear Assemblies…………………………………………………………………………… 17Figure 5: Stage 1 and Stage 2 Gear Assemblies…………………………………………………………………………… 17Figure 6: Side Image of all gears assembled………………………………………………………………………………… 18Figure 7: Gear Assembly with housing…………………………………………………………………………………………. 19Figure 8: Complete Gearbox Assembly……………………………………………………………………………………….. 19Figure 9: Bending Stress FEA of Input Shaft…………………………………………………………………………………. 20Figure 10: Torsional FEA Analysis of the Input Shaft……………………………………………………………………. 21Figure 11: Stage 1 Carrier Shaft Torque FEA Analysis……………………………………………………………………. 21Figure 12: Stage 2 Carrier shaft torque analysis……………………………………………………………………………. 22Figure 13: FEA Analysis showing the shear stresses in the carrier arm………………………………………… 22Figure 14: Bending Stresses on Stage 1 Carrier Arm……………………………………………………………………… 23Figure 15: Stage 2 Carrier Arm Shear and Bending FEA Analysis…………………………………………………… 23Figure 16: Planet Shaft shear stress FEA……………………………………………………………………………………….24Figure 17: "Round Top" vase and"Round Front" vase…………………………………………………………………. 26Figure 18: "Mahogany Heavy" vase and "Twisted Carbon Fiber" vase………………………………………. 27Figure 19: "Porcelain Petite" vase………………………………………………………………………………………………. 27Figure 20: Original Google Maps image and New image with 3D model of house on the image… 28Figure 21: 2 different angles presenting the 3D model of the house and its features……………….. 28Figure 22: Left front and Right back isometric views of original plate……………………………………….. 29Figure 23: Left front and Right back isometric views of Modified Plate…………………………………….. 29Figure 24: 3D unexploded and exploded views of the Guide Rod Assembly………………………………. 30Figure 25: Modified Guide Rod Assembly mounted on plate……………………………………………………… 30Figure 26: Exploded View of Modified Guide Rod Assembly mounted on plate…………………………. 30Figure 27: Crank assembly at 3 different rotated positions and rotation direction is shown………. 31Figure 28: Isometric View of Gearbox Assembly with and without housing sides removed……….. 31Figure 29: Exploded View of the Basic Gearbox Assembly…………………………………………………………. 32Figure 30: Two Isometric views of the surface truck…………………………………………………………………… 36Figure 31: Front and Rear Views of the surface truck model……………………………………………………… 36Figure 32: Side View of truck and Side View with doors colored gray………………………………………… 36Figure 33: Bending stress FEA of Shaft……………………………………………………………………………………….. 37Figure 34: Deflection results of shaft FEA analysis……………………………………………………………………… 37 3
  • 5. List of TablesPlanetary Gearbox Project Design Tables:Table 1: Gear Ratios……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 10Table 2: Gear Train Sizes………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 10Table 3: Forces on the Gears……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 11Table 4: Gear Stress Analysis Values……………………………………………………………………………………………. 13Table 5: Input/Output Shaft Materials and Basic Dimensions……………………………………………………… 13Table 6: Stresses in Gearbox Shafts……………………………………………………………………………………………… 14Table 7: Allowable Stresses in Shafts……………………………………………………………………………………………. 14Table 8: Keyway Design……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 15Table 9: Initial Carrier Arm Stress Analysis……………………………………………………………………………………. 16Table 10: Adjusted Carrier Arm Stress Analysis…………………………………………………………………………….. 16Table 11: Bearing Design……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….16 4
  • 6. 2-Stage Planetary Gearbox DesignTexas A&M UniversityMEEN 442 Design ProjectCompleted by: Eric HalfmannTo: Mr. Randall TuckerJuly 29th, 2011 AbstractA planetary gearbox is a device, like any other gearbox, used to transmit power from the motor to theapplication and to adjust the speed and torque available from the motor. Planetary gear drives are ableto transmit high torques at high speeds and are used in many different applications. The followingpaper describes the design of a 2-stage Planetary Speed Reducer with an overall gear ratio of 10:1 for a1 HP 3600 rpm NEMA C Face motor. All equations for the stress and force analysis of the design aregiven and a minimum safety factor of 2 is used to ensure that the proposed design is a successful designthat will hold up to the forces and torques in the system. In addition, a 3D SolidWorks model of thegearbox is created. Using this model, the gearbox design can be effectively communicated andillustrated as well as used to ensure the design functions correctly. Finite Element Analysis performedon the SolidWorks model was verified by the analytical calculations and further proves that theproposed design is adequate and will operate without failure. Finally, the SolidWorks model makescreating engineering drawings more time efficient and puts the gearbox design in a format that is readyto be manufactured. The following paper describes and illustrates a successful 2-stage planetarygearbox design for a 1 HP NEMA C Face motor operating at 3600 rpms. 5
  • 7. Nomenclatureb = gear thicknessd = shaft diameterm = modulen = overall gear ratio for that particular stagep = number of planet gearsr = radius of shaftt = thickness of carrier armusp= sun/planet gear ratiov = poisson’s numberA = cross sectional area on shaftCG = Gradient FactorCL = Load FactorCR = Reliability FactorCS = Surface FactorCT = Temperature FactorCrsp = Sun/planet Contact RatioCrrp = Ring/planet Contact RatioCreq = Required load rating capacity for bearingD = Diameter of GearE = Modulus of ElasticityF = forceFe = force on the bearingFBD = Free Body DiagramFp = Tangential forcesFc = Torque producing forces on carrier armH = diameter of hole in the carrier armI = moment of InertiaJ = polar moment of InertiaKa = bearing shock loading factor = Factor for division for load between teeth = Load distribution factor for bending = Factor for the division of load between teeth = Load distribution factor for surface pressureKr = bearing reliability factorKT = Stress Concentration FactorL = distance from support to location of forceLkey = length of the keywayLR = Life of bearing corresponding to rated capacityM = moment which is force*distanceN = number of teeth in GearPm = power motorR = Radius of Gear = Factor of safetySn = Allowable stressSu = Ultimate strength of materialSy = Yield strength of material 6
  • 8. = allowable stress valueT = TorqueW = width of carrier arm = Form factor for bending stress = Stress Cycle Factor for bending stress = Reliability Factor = Helix angle factor for bending = Contact Ratio Factor for bending = Temperature Factor = Form factor for Hertzian pressure = Material Factor for surface pressure =Stress cycle factor for surface pressure = Hardness ratio factors for pitting resistance = Contact Ratio Factor for surface pressure = bending deflectionσ = basic moment bending stress = Gear Bending Stress = Gear Surface Pressure = torsional stress on shaft = shear stress on planet gear shaftα = pressure angle (Here is 20 deg)ω = angular velocitySubscripts:in = input to Stageout = output of Stager = Ring Gear in Stages= Sun Gear in Stagep= Planet Gear in Stage 7
  • 9. 1.1 IntroductionMotors are used to produce the energy needed for many mechanical systems to function as desired.However, sometimes the motor doesn’t provide the required torque and/or speed, the neededflexibility to adjust operating conditions, or provide the capabilities to be directly coupled to theapplication. In these instances, gearboxes are used to bridge the gap between the motor and theapplication and to increase or decrease the amount of output torque at the expense of decreasing orincreasing the operating speed. Gearboxes are commonly used in all types of vehicles to transmit thepower from the motor to the wheels of the vehicle. A particular style of gear system called a PlanetaryGear Drive is often used in vehicle transmissions as well as many other applications. The planetary gearsystem is able to transmit high torques and operate at high speeds. One reason for this is because theevenly spaced planetary gears help to keep the overall forces acting on the system symmetric and thussum up to zero. In other words, there are essentially no other forces acting on the shafts of the gearboxexcept the torque at the input and output of each stage. This makes the planetary gearbox an attractivesolution to many gearbox needs as well as its compact and efficient design.The design project for the MEEN 442 Summer 2011 course is to design a planetary gearbox with a 10:1gear reduction for a 1 HP 3600 rpm NEMA C face motor similar to the one found in reference [5]. Thefollowing text will provide the details for the design of a 2-stage planetary gearbox. The paper willdiscuss the basic design concept for the gearbox, provide all necessary equations used for the design,illustrate the use of some basic finite element analysis done using SolidWorks, and show multiple figuresand engineering drawings of the gearbox design produced using the SolidWorks 3D engineeringsoftware. All free body diagrams (FBD) and hand calculations are provided in Appendix 1. However, theengineering analysis software MatLab was used to do the majority of the stress analysis calculations.This was done so that design parameters such as ring gear and shaft sizes could be altered and then thecorresponding design calculations could be easily and quickly reproduced. This made the design processmuch more efficient. 1.2 Design ConceptThe design requirements provided no dimensional requirements and it was left up to the students to fillin the blanks. It is assumed that only 1 gearbox will be manufactured, so readily available parts andsimple features will be used to design the gearbox to reduce the manufacturing costs of the gearbox.Metric dimensions were chosen for the design of this project so that the common force, distance, andweight units of newtons, meters, and kilograms used in many engineering texts could easily be usedwith minimal unit conversions needed. A module value of 1 (m=1) was chosen for simplicity so that thenumber of teeth for the gear equaled the pitch diameter of the gear in millimeters. It was also chosento design a planetary gearbox where the ring gear is stationary, the sun gear is the input, and the carriershaft is the output. In the design of this gearbox, it was decided that gearbox radial size was moreimportant than the overall weight of the system. This led to using a 2-stage design concept whichallowed for much smaller ring gears to be used to meet the 10:1 reduction. However, this adds a wholeother set of gears, but these gears will be much smaller so the weight difference could be comparable.Due to the number of gears in a 2-stage system, the planetary gears for each system were given thesame pitch diameter so that the actual number of different gears in the system would be reduced.According to the NEMA C Face dimensions in [6] and the common “56” frame used for these motors likethe one in [5], the diameter of the “56” frame is 6-5/8 inches. This led to a maximum ring gear pitchdiameter of 160mm (~6.3in) to be chosen so the overall radial size of the gearbox would be comparable 8
  • 10. to that of the motor. All other components such as the shafts, keys, keyways, etc. were designed towork with this basic design concept.In addition, the housing for the gearbox is a half-shell design so that symmetry can be used tomanufacture the main housing piece. This also makes assembly, accessing, and performingmaintenance on the gearbox easy. Figure 1 is a 3D image of the planetary gearbox which will bedescribed in this paper. Figure 1: 3D Image of proposed planetary gearbox design with top of housing removed 1.3 Gear Design1.3.1 Gear Ratio Design:To begin the design of the gearbox, the overall size for the Stage 1 ring gear needs to be determined. Asmentioned earlier, the ring gear pitch diameter chosen for Stage 1 is 160 mm. With the ring gear pitchdiameter determined, equations 1 and 2 given in [3] are used to determine the gear sizes for the sunand planet gears. The initial design statement gave us the output power of the motor. This power isconverted to watts and then the input torque to the motor is given in equation 3 and the output torquefor that stage is give in equation 4 from the Juvinal Design Book [1]. The values for the gear reductionsand the gear sizes are given in Tables 1 and 2. (1) (2) (3) (4) 9
  • 11. Table 1: Gear Ratios Input Output Overall 10 1 Stage 1 3 1 Stage 2 3.33 1 Overall RPM 3600 360 Stage 1 RPM 3600 1200 Stage 2 RPM 1200 360 Overall Torque (N*m) 1.98 19.8 Stage 1 (N*m) 1.98 5.94 Stage 2 (N*m) 5.94 19.8 Table 2: Gear Train Sizes Diameters (mm) Stage 1 Stage 2 Ring Gear 160 140 Sun Gear 80 60 Planet Gear 40 40 Number of Teeth Stage 1 Stage 2 Ring Gear 160 140 Sun Gear 80 60 Planet Gear 40 40 Width for All Gears: b = 10mm1.3.2 Gear Force and Stress Analysis:With the gear sizes determined, then the force and stress analysis can be performed on the gears. AllFBDs associated with this section are shown in Appendix 1. The equations and process for determiningthe stresses can be found in references [3] and [2]. To begin determining the forces on the system, aFBD for the carrier/output shaft, the planet gear, sun gear, and ring gears are drawn. Using the FBD’sand equations 5-7 from [3], we were able to determine the tangential forces, Fp, on the gear teeth andthe torque producing force, Fc, on the carrier arms. The forces are shown in Table 3. (5) (6) or (7) 10
  • 12. Table 3: Forces on the Gears Stage 1: Forces Tangential Force 16.5 N Carrier Force 33 N Stage 2: Forces Tangential Force 49.5 N Carrier Force 99 NWith the forces on the gears determined, then the stress analysis can be performed. According to [1]and [2], the surface pressure and the bending stress are the two critical stress analysis procedures thatneed to be performed on the gears. The following equations used for this analysis are from reference[3] because in [3] they had already derived the changes needed for the different gear meshes, especiallythe internal gear mesh which required different derivation for its contact ratio. Reference [3] uses theSwedish gear standards, but when compared to the procedures in [1] and [2] the stress analysis seemsto be identical. A check was made with a few of the different equations and the values calculated werethe same, so it is assumed the stress analysis in [3] is adequate for American standards.For the sun/planet gear mesh, equations 8-12 are used to determine the surface pressure on the gears.In equation 8, are assumed to be 1 and 1.3 as used in [3]. Equations 13-16 are used tocalculate the bending stress in the gears. Here is 1 and are given the same value as which is suggested in [3]. (8) (9) √ √ (10) √ **All values from the presented calculations in this paper are logged in the Tables. (11) √ (12) √ (13) (14) (15) 11
  • 13. Sun/Planet Mesh Fc Ring/Planet Mesh Planet Fp Fp Gear Sun Gear Ring Gear Figure 2: Figure of gear meshes and the associated forcesFor the ring/planet gear mesh, the same equations that were used for the sun/planet gear mesh areused here except with a small change in the contact pressure calculations. This change is mainly a slightdifference in calculating the contact ratio between the planet and ring gear which is given in equations16 and 17. (16) (17) √ √With the stresses determined, the maximum allowable stress had to be calculated to determinewhether the stresses found in the previous equations would be acceptable or not. The followingequations, 18 and 19, for determining the maximum allowable stresses are from [2]. The values for theallowable stress factors given in equations 18 and 19 are given in reference [2]. The material used forthe allowable stress is assumed Grade 1 steel as given in Tables 14-3 and 14-6 in reference [2] and asafety factor of 2 is used as suggested by [1]. Table 4 shows the allowable stresses and the calculatedbending and surface stresses found using the equations described. Observing the values in Table 4verifies that the stresses in the gears do not exceed the allowable surface and bending stresses and thusthe proposed design will be satisfactory for the gearbox specifications desired in this project.Also, the catalog torque limits can be observed to come to this same conclusion. According towww.qtcgears.com, the allowable torque for the planet gear is 14.7Nm, and the allowable torques forsimilar sun gears for stage 1 and stage 2 are 33.9Nm and 24.2Nm respectively. For the specifiedgearbox, these torques are not exceeded and thus the chosen gears are satisfactory. (18) (19) 12
  • 14. Table 4: Gear Stress Analysis Values Stage 1: Sun/Planet Gear Mesh Stage 2: Sun/Planet Gear Mesh Surface Pressure 115.7 N/mm^2 Surface Pressure 229.24 N/mm^2 Bending Stress 2.7 N/mm^2 Bending Stress 8.24 N/mm^2 Stage 1: Ring/Planet Gear Mesh Stage 2: Ring/Planet Gear Mesh Surface Pressure 56.14 N/mm^2 Surface Pressure 94.7 N/mm^2 Bending Stress 2.5 N/mm^2 Bending Stress 7.55 N/mm^2 Allowable Stress Values Allowable Surface Presssure 390.7 N/mm^2 Allowable Bending Stress 103.3 N/mm^2 1.4 Shaft Force and Stress Analysis 1.4.1 Input/Output Shaft Analysis: The planetary gear design is a unique gear design that allows for high torques to be transmitted because the major forces in the system are only seen on the gears. Since the forces on the gears cancel each other by having equal spaced planet gears, the only forces that the shafts see are forces due to the weight of the system. However, the shafts will still experience the total torque transmitted by the gears. Thus, the critical part for designing the shafts is the torsional stress limit. This is illustrated in the attached free body diagrams. The proposed shaft dimensions and material properties for the shafts are documented in Table 5. Table 5: Input/Output Shaft Materials and Basic Dimensions Stage 1 Length Min. Dia. Max. Dia. Material Density Mass* Modulus of Elasticity Su, Ultimate Strength Sy, Yield StrengthInput Shaft 91mm 15mm 17mm 1020 HR Steel 7.7e3 Kg/m2 0.1325 kg 207e9 Pa 455e6 Pa 290e6 Pa Carrier 53mm 15mm 17mm 1020 HR Steel 7.7e3 Kg/m3 0.3437 kg 207e9 Pa 455e6 Pa 290e6 PaPlanet Shaft 34 mm 10 mm 12mm 1020 HR Steel 7.7e3 Kg/m4 0.0219 kg 207e9 Pa 455e6 Pa 290e6 Pa Stage 2 Length Min. Dia. Max. Dia. Material Density Mass* Modulus of Elasticity Su, Ultimate Strength Sy, Yield Strength Carrier 53 mm 17mm 20mm 1020 HR Steel 7.7e3 Kg/m3 0.378 kg 207e9 Pa 455e6 Pa 290e6 PaPlanet Shaft 34 mm 10 mm 12mm 1020 HR Steel 7.7e3 Kg/m4 0.0219 kg 207e9 Pa 455e6 Pa 290e6 Pa*Mass is taken from SolidWorks To calculate the static torsional stress in the shaft, equations 20 and 22 from [1] are used where the KT value in both equations 20 and 23 is the stress concentration factors due to the shoulders on the shafts and the grooves for retaining rings. Also, the calculations for the basic torsional stress and bending stress are done using the minimum shaft diameter since each shaft has a step change in its size. The input shaft initially has the common 5/8 in. diameter shaft to easily couple with the motor, but then the shaft diameter is adjusted to allow for the bearing and a shoulder to hold the gear in place. In equation 21 the torsional fatigue strength for infinite life and 99.9% reliability is calculated and in Table 7 a safety factor of 2 is incorporated. In this equation Sn’=0.5Su for steel for the lack of better data and the rest of the strength factors are found on pg. 303 of [1] the Juvinal Design book. Equations 20 and 23 utilize the stress concentration factor values taken from [1]. (20) (21) 13
  • 15. (22)Along with the torsional stresses, the bending stresses and deflections of the shafts without bearingscan be calculated to determine if the bending stresses or deflections are a critical design parameter. Asmentioned before, the only bending forces on the shaft is the weight of the shaft itself so it does notappear to be very critical. However, the bending stresses and deflections are easily calculated withequations 23-25 and equation 26 is used to calculate the shear stress in the planet gear shaft. Thefatigue strength for bending can be calculated using equation 21 and the appropriate values for thefactors. (23) (24) (25) (26)The values for the torsional and bending stresses and the deflections can be seen in Table 6. The outputshaft is the shaft part of the “carrier”. The stresses seen in Table 6 do not exceed the allowable stressesshown in Table 7, so the proposed shaft design is satisfactory for the required specifications. As shownin Table 5, the minimum diameter for the output shaft had to be increased to 17mm so that thetorsional stresses in the shaft would be less than the allowable stress. Table 6: Stresses in Gearbox Shafts Stage 1 Torsional Stress Bending Stress Deflection at L/2 Shear Stress Input Shaft 3.58 N/mm2 0.2356 N/mm2 7.9e-5 mm - Ouput Shaft 10.75 N/mm2 0.178 N/mm3 4.07e-5 mm - Planet Shaft - - - 0.5602 N/mm2 Stage 2 Torsional Stress Bending Stress Deflection at L/2 Shear Stress Ouput Shaft 24.6 N/mm2 0.135 N/mm3 7.9e-5 mm - Planet Shaft - - - 1.6807 N/mm2 Table 7: Allowable Stresses in Shaft (SF = 2) Stage 1 Torsional 26.8 N/mm2 Bending 46.2 N/mm2 Stage 2 Torsional 26.8 N/mm2 Bending 46.2 N/mm2 1020 HR Yield Strength = 290 N/mm^2 14
  • 16. 1.4.2 Keyway Design Analysis:With the size of the shafts determined based off of stress design including stress concentration factorsand a safety factor, then the keyways need to be designed. The following equations, 27 and 28, from [1]are used for the keyway design. Table 8 shows the keyway specifications and it shows that theallowable torques are not exceeded by the torque values being transmitted by the gearbox from thespecified 1 HP motor and a 10:1 gear reduction. (27) (28) Table 8: Keyway Design Stage 1 Key Length in 27 mm Key Length Carrier 27 mm Allowable Torque in 127.7 N/m Allowable Torque out 127.7 N/m Stage 2 Key Length Carrier 30mm Torque allowed out 185.9 N/m Key Square = 5x5mm from SolidWorks Gear1.4.3 Carrier Arm Stress Analysis: Shear Stress Fc Bending Stress Figure 3: Forces on Carrier ArmsIn section 6, it is shown that the carrier arm design utilizes a bearing that is inset into the arm. Thisdesign allows for the carrier force, Fc, to act directly onto the hole inside of the arm. This means thatthe stresses in the arm will act like a tensile force acting on the inside of the hole and thus for this partthe stress analysis needs to incorporate a stress concentration factor. The equation for this tensilestress analysis is given in equation 29 from [1] and the stress concentration factor is given by KT as well.Equation 23 is used to calculate the bending stress for this part as well. Table 9 shows the stresses inthe carrier arm based off of the original proposed design for the carrier arm. The stress values in Table 9for Stage 2 exceed the yield strength of 1020 HR steel given in Table 5. This suggests that the design ofthe Stage 2 carrier arm needs to be adjusted so that the stress in the arm does not exceed the materialyield strength. The two options for this are to either make the carrier arm a full disk or to increase the 15
  • 17. width and thickness of the carrier arm. It was chosen to adjust the geometry of just the Stage 2 carrierarm to have a width of 40 mm instead of the width of 30 mm initially used which is still used for Stage 1.Both carrier arms still incorporate a thickness of 7 mm. Table 10 shows the new bending stress value of2.068 MPa which is well under the yield strength for 1020 HR steel given in Table 5. (29) Table 9: Initial Carrier Arm Stress Analysis Tensile Bending Stage 1 0.754 N/mm^2 (0.754MPa) 1.84 N/mm^2 (1.84 MPa) Stage 2 2.263 N/mm^2 (0.226 MPa) 4.29 N/mm^2 (4.29 Mpa) Table 10: Adjusted Carrier Arm Stress Analysis Tensile Bending Stage 1 0.754 N/mm^2 (0.754MPa) 1.84 N/mm^2 (1.84 MPa) Stage 2 0.97 N/mm^2 2.068 N/mm^2 (2.07 Mpa) 1.5 Bearing DesignWith the keyway design done, then the FBD for the overall gearbox needs to be evaluated and thenradial loads on the bearings determined. With the radial load, we can calculate the bearings requiredfor the application. To determine the bearing required for 90e6 revolution life and 99% percentreliability, equation 30 from [1] is used. The following values for the constants are: Ka = 1.3 for ballbearing, Kr = 0.2 for 99% reliability, and Lr = 90e6 revolutions for use with Table 14.2 in [1]. Design isassumed for machines for 8-hour service every working day, so L = revolutions for 20-30 thousand hoursat 3600 rpms as given in [1]. For the FBD we need to know the total weight of the gearbox design.However, the ring gear and housing supports the weight of all of the gears, so essentially the bearingswill only be supporting the weight of the shafts. The weight of the shafts is shown in Table 5 and thesevalues are approximate and taken from SolidWorks. (30) Table 11: Bearing Design Required Capacity Input Bearing (17mm bore) 21.3 N Middle Bearing (17mm bore) 15.4 N Output Bearing (20mm bore) 10.7 N Planet Bearing (10mm bore) 752 N Bearing Capacity for Xlt (ExtraLight)* 10 mm Bore 1.02 kN 17 mm Bore 1.32 kN 20 mm Bore 2.25 kN *Capacities from Table 14.2 in [1] Bearing Capacity from Solidworks Calculator* 10 mm Bore - 15 mm OD 1.1 kN 17 mm Bore - 23 mm OD 1.9 kN 20mm Bore - 27mm OD 2.5 kN *Capacity for 99% reliability 16
  • 18. Table 11 provides the bearing capacity calculation values. The required bearing capacity for eachbearing is given at the top of Table 11. The bearing capacity for extra-light bearings as given in Table14.2 of [1] is shown in Table 11 as well. These values were compared to the SolidWorks bearing capacitycalculator values for the actual bearings created using the SolidWorks toolbox. When observing thevalues in Table 11, the bearing capacity numbers from [1] are real similar to the calculated numbersgiven from the Solidworks calculator and these capacities for the bearings exceed the requiredcapacities given from equation 30 and are thus acceptable. 1.6 SolidWorks Model of GearboxThe gearbox design is built as a 3D model using the SolidWorks engineering software. This section willhighlight the 3D model of the gearbox and illustrate additional features of the design as well as addressSolidWorks tools used to make the 3D part.1.6.1 Gear Assembly Retaining Ring Grooves Keyway Keyway Keyway Figure 4: Left is Stage 1 gear assembly and Right is Stage 2 Gear Assembly Planet Shaft with ring groove and key way Figure 5: Left is Stage 1 Gear Assembly and Right is Stage 2 Gear Assembly 17
  • 19. Bearing 17mm bore Bearing 20mm bore Planet Bearing 10mm bore Bearing 17mm bore Figure 6: Side Image of Gear AssemblyFigures 4-5 are the assembly of the gearbox without the housing around the gears. The sun and ringgears were built using the SolidWorks Toolbox utilities feature. This feature has commonly availablemechanical parts such as gears, bolts, bearings, retaining rings, nuts, etc. already built in the SolidWorksprogram and all the user has to do is specify certain dimensions. For the gears, only the pitch diameter,module, pitch angle, gear width, hub dimensions, and whether a keyway is needed has to be specifiedand then SolidWorks builds the part. This feature is also used to build the bearings, retaining rings, andbolts used in this assembly. The bearings are noted in Figure 6. The SolidWorks Toolbox also has anautomatic grooving feature which automatically constructs the grooves for common retaining rings, andthis tool was used for all retaining ring grooves. Many manufacturers for mechanical parts provide 3Ddrawings for available parts that they sell. The planet gears for the assembly were taken fromwww.qtcgears.com and then assembled in the gearbox. The benefit to using common and readilyavailable parts is that the overall price to manufacture a gearbox is greatly reduced. As mentioned inthe earlier design portion of this paper, the material for the gears is steel and the material for the shaftsis 1020 HR steel. These materials were chosen for their low cost and for being readily available.1.6.2 Gearbox HousingThe housing for the gearbox is chosen to be built out of 6061 aluminum due to its low cost, easymanufacturability, and it being readily available. The total amount of force transmitted to the housing isthe sum of all the carrier forces, Fc. There are currently no analytical design calculations performed toensure the proposed housing design will hold up to the total amount of force transmitted to thehousing. The following housing design is to propose a geometric design concept that will work forhousing the planetary gear system designed in this paper.The design concept chosen for the housing is a shell type of housing. This design concept provides easyaccessibility and assembly for the planetary gearbox. It also utilizes symmetry for each half of thehousing so it will be cheaper to manufacture the housing components with only the addition of a fewbolt holes in the top shell. The housing is designed to secure the bearings in place and the shells attachby a flange style connection. To secure the middle bearing in place, an additional column was builtwhich bolts internally onto the main housing shell and a flange style connector to secure the bearing inplace on the column. This adjustment was made as an additional part so alignment onto the stage 1carrier shaft would be easier and adjustable if need be. For the planetary gearbox design to function 18
  • 20. properly, the ring gear has to be stationary and is thus designed to be bolted straight to the housing.Figures 7 and 8 are different 3D views of the gearbox assembly housing. Middle Bearing Support Gasket Figure 7: Left image is bottom shell of housing and Right is bottom shell with gear assembly mounted in it Input Shaft Cover Input Shaft Output Shaft Gearbox Feet Figure 8: Left is Gearbox assembly with input shaft cover and right is 3D image of gearbox assembly with all componentsThere are a few features about the gearbox assembly housing that need to be pointed out. All of thebolts used in the assembly are M4 threaded bolts with varying lengths. This was done to reduce thenumber of tap dies needed to make the holes, the number of tools needed to assemble the gearbox,and the number of different bolting components since it is assumed that only 1 of these gearboxes willbe manufactured. Figure 8 also shows a shaft cover/connecting piece mounted onto the gearbox. Thispiece is added to cover the input shaft of the gearbox and the output shaft of the motor duringoperation. This increases the safety of the gearbox for nearby workers or other equipment. This coveris designed to align directly to a 56 frame NEMA C Face motor. This will also help with the rigidity of theentire system when mounted to the motor. There were also feet added to the housing assembly. Thesefeet will allow for stability of the gearbox and make the gearbox easy to secure to a mounting location.1.6.3 Engineering DrawingsIn addition to building a 3D model of the proposed planetary gearbox design in SolidWorks, engineeringdrawings are produced in SolidWorks which will aid in the manufacturing of the various components. 19
  • 21. These drawings include all necessary data needed to manufacture each component and are organizedbased off of ASME standards as directed by the 2010 SolidWorks book [7]. The tolerances for the shaftsand holes are based off of H9/d9 and D9/h9 fits for the hole and shaft basis as described in the 27thEdition Machinery’s Handbook [8]. These fits are free running fits intended for higher running speeds.The fit for a 15mm and 17mm shafts was not given, so the tolerance for the 16mm shaft from [8] is usedfor both of these shaft sizes in the attached drawings since it is the closest. The tolerance for thelocation of the bearings on its related shaft or inset on the carrier uses the location fit H7/h6 from [8]. Ifthe actual size is not in [8] then the next closest size in [8] will be used. This provides a snug fit for thebearings and allows for the bearings to be freely assembled and disassembled. Drawings for thegearbox design can be found in Appendix 2. 1.7 SolidWorks Finite Element AnalysisSolidWorks is a powerful engineering analysis tool in addition to a 3D graphic software. In this section,multiple finite element analysis (FEA) studies will be done on a few of the components in the gearbox.All FEA tools should be used with skepticism and should always be verified with analytical calculationswhen possible. Analytical calculations only work for really basic geometries and typically involvemultiple assumptions in order for the basic analysis equations to be accurate and simple. Because ofthis, the FEA stresses in the gearbox components are expected to be different from the handcalculations and will probably be higher than the analytical calculations due to the additional featuressuch as retaining ring grooves and keyways. To verify the FEA analysis from SolidWorks, the stressvalues of the components well away from the applied loads and additional features will be compared tothe analytical values. In this section we will observe the FEA analysis of stresses in the input shaft,planet shaft, and carrier components. All loads applied in the FEA analysis are the same values as theforces and torques shown in Tables 1 and 3.1.7.1 Bending Stress of Input ShaftAs observed in the analytical calculations, the bending stress in the shafts was not a critical design issuebecause the only force on each shaft is the weight of the shaft. So only the bending stress of the inputshaft is studied for comparison with the analytical calculation values in Table 6. Here the weight of theshaft is given in Table 5 and this produces a force of 1.3N. The FEA analysis is shown below in Figure 9.Figure 9 shows 3 different stress values obtained in the FEA analysis. The highest stresses are expectedto be at the end of the shaft where the shaft is fixed. Figure 9 shows that this is the case and thatstresses a little over a diameter away from the end are about 0.256 N/mm^2. This is similar to the 0.236N/mm^2 obtained by equation 23 and located in Table 6. Applied Vertical Load 0.256 N/mm^2: (*Compare to 0.236 N/mm^2 in Table 6) Figure 9: Bending Stress FEA of Input Shaft 20
  • 22. 1.7.2 Torsional FEA Analysis of Shaft ComponentsHere we will study the torsional stresses in the input shaft, stage 1 carrier shaft, and stage 2 carriershaft. Figure 10 shows the FEA for the input shaft, and in this study the torque was applied around theface of the shaft over the area of the keyway and then the keyway on the other end was the fixedgeometry. The stress values closer to the center of the shaft and on each side of the shoulder are usedto compare with the values in Table 6. As shown in Figure 10, the analytical calculations predict a stressvalue of 3.58 N/mm^2 which is pretty similar to the values of 3.86N/mm^2 and 4.37N/mm^2. Thus theFEA analysis is assumed to be accurate and the input shaft is sufficient for this design. 4.37 N/mm^2 (*compare to 3.58 N/mm^2 in Table 6) 3.86 N/mm^2 (*compare to 3.58 N/mm^2 in Table 6) Figure 10: Torsional FEA Analysis of the Input ShaftFigures 11 and 12 are the torsional analysis of the Stage 1 and Stage 2 carrier components. Here thecarrier arm feature is held fixed while the torsional load is applied to the face of the shaft in the area ofthe keyway. Figure 11 shows that the stress values obtained by the FEA a distance away from thekeyway are very similar to the analytical value for stress in Table 6. This value is expected to be close tothe analytical value since it is located away from the applied load and any unique features. The stressesincrease as you get closer to the keyway and the area where the torque is applied which is expected.The stress values given by the FEA analysis are still within the acceptable range and are verified by howsimilar they are to the analytical values. 10.1N/mm^2 (*compare to 10.75N/mm^2 in Table 6) 17.4N/mm^2 (*compare to 10.75N/mm^2 in Table 6) Figure 11: Stage 1 Carrier Shaft Torque FEA Analysis 21
  • 23. Figure 12 is the torsional analysis for the Stage 2 carrier shaft. Here similar results are found to whatwas found in Figure 11. The torsional stress values closer to the carrier arm feature is very similar to theanalytical calculations, which verifies the FEA analysis, and as you get closer to the area where thetorque was applied and the keyway feature, the stress values increase. The FEA analysis verifies that thestress values are still within the acceptable range. 20.9N/mm^2 (*compare to 24.6N/mm^2 in Table 6) 34.2N/mm^2 (*compare to 24.6N/mm^2 in Table 6) Figure 12: Stage 2 Carrier shaft torque analysis1.7.3 Carrier Arm Shear and Bending StressesIn this section the carrier arm shear and bending stresses produced by the carrier force, as shown inFigure 3 and given in Table 3, will be studied. The stress values given by the FEA analysis will becompared to the values in Table 10. Figures 13 and 14 are the FEA analysis for the shear and bending ofthe Stage 1 carrier arm. Figure 13 shows that the FEA analysis only predicts 0.3N/mm^2 shear stresswhile the analytical calculations predict 0.75N/mm^2. The discrepancy in the values is that theanalytical calculations assume the 15mm hole the bearing sits in goes all the way through the arm but inreality there is still the small lip with a 11mm diameter hole which will decrease the stress values. 0.3N/mm^2 (*compare to 0.75N/mm^2 in Table 10) Figure 13: FEA Analysis showing the shear stresses in the carrier arm 22
  • 24. Figure 14 shows that the predicted bending stresses obtained in the FEA Analysis are very similar towhat was obtained analytically. 1.42N/mm^2 (*compare to 1.84N/mm^2 in Table 10) Figure 14: Bending Stresses on Stage 1 Carrier ArmFigure 15 is the FEA analysis for the shear and bending stresses in the Stage 2 carrier arm. In this figureboth the shear stresses due to the load and the bending stresses are noted. Figure 15, similar to theStage 1 Carrier analysis, shows that the stresses in the Stage 2 Carrier arm due to the carrier force, Fc,are satisfactory for this design and that the FEA analysis and the analytical calculations are very similarthus verifying their accuracy. 0.48N/mm^2 (*compare to 0.97N/mm^2 in Table 10) 2.24N/mm^2 (*compare to 2.07N/mm^2 in Table 10) Figure 15: Stage 2 Carrier Arm Shear and Bending FEA Analysis1.7.4 Planet Shaft Shear FEAThe final FEA analysis performed is the shear stress analysis of the planet gear shaft due to the carrierforce. The stress values produced by the FEA analysis will be compared to the shear stress value inTable 6 for the stage 2 planet shaft since this stage is where the planet shaft will experience the highest 23
  • 25. carrier force of 99N. Figure 16 shows that near the location where the shear force is applied, the stressvalues are similar to that of the analytical calculations. The stress values increase as you get closer tothe fixed end. The fixed geometry is not a good representation of the actual design since the sectionwith the key would be supported by the gear. The higher stresses closer to the fixed end are actuallybending stresses due to the way the FEA analysis was done with the fixed geometry. This suggests thatthe FEA analysis should be performed with a different fixture and with a different load applied to betterresemble the load applied to the area the bearing occupies and for the fixture to cover the area inside ofthe gear. 1.06N/mm^2 (*compare to 1.7N/mm^2 in Table 6) 3.6N/mm^2 (*compare to 1.7N/mm^2 in Table 6) Figure 16: Planet Shaft shear stress FEAThis section successfully verified the accuracy of both the analytical calculations and the FEA analysispredictions. This increases the confidence that each of these components are correctly designed for thisgearbox design and will operate correctly. 1.8 Future WorkThis paper described a fully designed gear system including shaft and bearing analysis. However, tohave a fully designed gearbox suitable for operation, there is additional design analysis that needs to beperformed. A vibration study needs to be performed to identify the natural frequencies of the gearboxand to ensure the system is not running at any of the critical speeds. If a system operates at one of itsnatural frequencies, then the vibrations of the system will be large and can continue to increase causingmajor damage to the system which could lead to a catastrophic failure.Further work needs to be done on the lubrication and sealing of the gearbox. It is assumed that thegearbox will be oil lubricated and the type of lubricant can be easily determined from lubrication textand the speed and torque of the system. Gearboxes of this type are commonly oil lubricated and thegearbox is partially filled with oil, so as the gears rotate they will continue to be lubricated by passingthrough the oil. With this type of lubrication, additional holes will need to be added onto the gearbox toallow for draining and filling the oil. Also, a pressure relief cap or hole will need to be designated so the 24
  • 26. pressure added to the gearbox on startup can escape the housing. Finally, additional stress analysisneeds to be performed on the housing to ensure that its current geometrical design and chosen materialwill hold up to the forces and torques of the system.A final minor design adjustment needs to be made on the planet gear shaft and the carrier arm. Thecurrent design makes the retaining rings have an extremely tight fit that might not work in real life.Some minor adjustments need to be made to ensure the retaining rings comfortably fit in their grooves. 1.9 ConclusionA 2-stage planetary gearbox was successfully designed for a 1 HP NEMA C Face motor operating at 3600rpms. The 2-stage gearbox design ensures that the gearbox will fit in any radial space that the drivingmotor will fit and still obtains the desired 10:1 reduction required out of the gearbox. All necessarydesign calculations were utilized to design the individual components and to ensure the successfulfunctionality of the gearbox design. These calculations verified the FEA done on a few of thecomponents which greatly increases the confidence that this design will function properly. In additionto fully designing the 2-stage planetary gear system through design analysis, SolidWorks was used tobuild a 3D model of the gearbox. The SolidWorks model made it possible to ensure the gearbox designfunctioned properly, provided the graphics needed to effectively communicate the design to customers,and puts the gearbox design in a format that can easily be manufactured through the engineeringdrawings and the SolidWorks parts. This paper provided a successful and complete design of a PlanetaryGear Reducer for a 1 HP NEMA C Face motor operating at 3600 rpms, and with a little more designanalysis (as mentioned in Section 8) this gearbox will be ready to be manufactured and tested. 1.10 References[1]Juvinall, R.C., and Marshek, K., Fundamentals of Machine Component Design 4th Edition, John Wiley &Sons 2006, Print[2]Budynas, R.G., and Nisbett, J.K., Mechanical Engineering Design 8th Edition, McGraw Hill CompaniesInc, 2008 Pring[3] Roos, F., and Spiegelberg, C., “Relations between size and gear ratio in spur and planetary geartrains,” Department of Machine Design, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm 2004 ISSN 1400-1179[4]Palazzolo, A., “Dr. Alan Palazzolo’s MEEN 617 Vibration Course Notes,” Texas A&M University, 2010[5] http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/DAYTON-General-Purpose-Motor-5K673[6] http://www.electricmotorservice.net/nemachart.pdf[7] Planchard, D.C., and Planchard, P.P., Engineering Design with SolidWorks 2010, SDC Publications2010[8] Oberg, E., Jones, F.D., Horton, H.L., and Ryffel, H., Machinery’s Handbook 27th Edition, Industrial PressInc, 2004 25
  • 27. 2. VasesIn this assignment multiple different vases were built as 3D models in SolidWorks. Heremultiple different features such as lofting, revolving, extruding, sweeping, etc. were used tobuild the vases. The vases were all given materials that suit their particular features and theimages of these vases were rendered using the Photoworks add in. The following figures arethe 5 vases created. Figure 17: LEFT: "Round Top" vase with green glass; RIGHT: "Round Front" vase with clear glass and patterned back 26
  • 28. Figure 18: LEFT: "Mahogany Heavy" vase and RIGHT: "Twisted Carbon Fiber" vase Figure 19: "Porcelain Petite" vase 27
  • 29. 3. Google House:In this homework, a house was found using google maps and then a 3D graphic of the housewas built up off of the google map image. By using surrounding objects, a very close scale forthe house could be obtained and then an accurate 3D model of the house could be built. Allfeatures of the house including doors, windows, etc. were built and materials were applied tothese components. The following figures present this assignment. Figure 20: LEFT: Original Google Maps image; RIGHT: New image with 3D model of house built on the image Figure 21: 2 different angles presenting the 3D model of the house and its features 28
  • 30. 4. Guide Rod Assembly Plates:Here the plates for the Guide Rod Assembly in the Solidworks Tutorial book, reference [7] ofthe gearbox design report, were built. This was done following along in the book and utilizedmany additional features such as the hole wizard. The figures below show the original platefrom the book and a modified plate. Figure 22: Left front and Right back isometric views of original plate Figure 23: Left front and Right back isometric views of Modified Plate 29
  • 31. 5. Guide Rod Assembly:Here the complete Guide Rod assembly was built and assembled as instructed by theSolidWorks tutorial book. Many features, such as mirroring, linear pattering, and the holewizard, were utilized to aid in the building and assembling of the Guide Rod. The original guiderod assembly as instructed by the book was made, and then it was altered to make a new guiderod assembly that has different dimensional sizes. Figure 24: 3D unexploded and exploded views of the Guide Rod Assembly Figure 25: Modified Guide Rod Assembly mounted on plate Figure 26: Exploded View of Modified Guide Rod Assembly mounted on plate 30
  • 32. 6. Rotating Crank Assembly:Here a basic rotating crank assembly model was built and assembled in SolidWorks. It was builtand assembled so that the crank assembly would operate correctly. To illustrate the operationof the crank, 3 different views of the assembly are shown with the crank in 3 different positionsrotating clockwise. Figure 27: Crank assembly at 3 different rotated positions and rotation direction is shown7. Basic Gearbox Assembly:In this assignment, a very basic gearbox was modeled. Two identical gears were created usingthe SolidWorks Toolbox and then the shafts and the housing were built so that they could beassembled together. The goal of the assignment was to learn how to add new parts to anassembly and then construct the housing around the assembly. Output Shaft Input Shaft Figure 28: LEFT: Isometric View of Gearbox Assembly; RIGHT: Isometric View with housing sides removed 31
  • 33. Figure 29: Exploded View of the Basic Gearbox Assembly8. Basic Gearbox 2D Engineering Drawings2D engineering drawings of the shafts and housing of the basic gearbox is made. The drawingswere made per ASME Y14.5 as instructed by the SolidWorks book. The un-dimensionedtolerance block was filled out, a logo was added, and an assembly drawing with a bill ofmaterials is made to detail the assembly. The engineering drawings are on the following pages. 32
  • 34. 33
  • 35. 34
  • 36. 35
  • 37. 9. Surface Truck Model:The truck model shown below is a truck built using only “Surface Features.” Surface featuresare important when modeling complex features such as the surfaces on a computer mouse andthese surface models make manufacturing complex features much easier. Here the truckmodeled includes headlights, taillights, windows, doors, tires, and wheels. This assignmenthighlights the abilities of surface features and how unique surfaces can be built. Figure 30: Two Isometric views of the surface truck Figure 31: Front and Rear Views of the surface truck model Figure 32: LEFT: Side View of truck; RIGHT: Side View with doors colored gray 36
  • 38. 10. Basic Finite Element Analysis (FEA) using SolidWorks SimulationsHere a basic bending stress FEA study was done using the input shaft of the Planetary Gearboxdesigned in the design project. A bending stress study was performed and the force in thestudy is 1.4N from the weight of the shaft. The following equation is the basic bending stressequation where M = 1.4*moment arm.SolidWorks also has a beam calculator feature which does basic analytical beam calculations.The stress value from this calculator is verified with the equation above and the stress anddeflection values are 0.14 N/mm2 and 0.000034mm.The figures below show the FEA study results from SolidWorks and their comparable analyticalvalues. The accuracy of the FEA study is verified. 0.155 N/mm2 compared to the value obtained analytically of 0.14 N/mm2 Figure 33: Bending stress FEA of Shaft Fixed end Deflection of 0.000051mm compared to the analytical value of 0.000034mm Figure 34: Deflection results of shaft FEA analysis 37
  • 39. Appendix 1: Free Body Diagrams and Hand Calculations for Project 38
  • 40. 39
  • 41. 40
  • 42. 41
  • 43. 42
  • 44. 43
  • 45. Appendix 2: Engineering Drawings of Gearbox Components for Planetary Gearbox 44
  • 46. 27 48 1.600 60 R3.050 2.500 93 R0.500 R1 DETAIL A SCALE 2 : 1 B27.8 - 3DM1 - 15 (External Retaining Ring Groove) R1 2.420 B A 4.755 DETAIL B SCALE 2 : 1 Eric Halfmann UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED: NAME DATE DIMENSIONS ARE IN MILLIMETERS DRAWN TOLERANCES: ANGULAR: MACH 0 30 CHECKED TITLE: ONE PLACE DECIMAL 0.5 Input Shaft ENG APPR. TWO PLACE DECIMAL 0.15 MFG APPR.SolidWorks Student Edition. PROPRIETARY AND CONFIDENTIAL THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS INTERPRET GEOMETRIC TOLERANCING PER: ASME Y14.5 MATERIAL Q.A. COMMENTS: SIZE DWG. NO. REV A 1020 HR SteelFor Academic Use Only. DRAWING IS THE SOLE PROPERTY OF <INSERT COMPANY NAME HERE>. ANY InputShaft_Stage1_Drawing REPRODUCTION IN PART OR AS A WHOLE FINISH WITHOUT THE WRITTEN PERMISSION OF NEXT ASSY USED ON Machined <INSERT COMPANY NAME HERE> IS PROHIBITED. APPLICATION DO NOT SCALE DRAWING SCALE: 1:1 WEIGHT: SHEET 1 OF 2 5 4 3 2 1
  • 47. 14.950 14.907 38 17.000 16.989 R4.265 2.785 34 15.825 15.782 R0.500 2.071 DETAIL D SCALE 2 : 1 5 D C DETAIL C SCALE 2 : 1 Eric Halfmann UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED: NAME DATE DIMENSIONS ARE IN MILLIMETERS DRAWN TOLERANCES: ANGULAR: MACH 0 30 CHECKED TITLE: ONE PLACE DECIMAL 0.5 Input Shaft ENG APPR. TWO PLACE DECIMAL 0.15 MFG APPR.SolidWorks Student Edition. PROPRIETARY AND CONFIDENTIAL THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS INTERPRET GEOMETRIC TOLERANCING PER: ASME Y14.5 MATERIAL Q.A. COMMENTS: SIZE DWG. NO. REV A 1020 HR SteelFor Academic Use Only. DRAWING IS THE SOLE PROPERTY OF <INSERT COMPANY NAME HERE>. ANY InputShaft_Stage1_Drawing REPRODUCTION IN PART OR AS A WHOLE FINISH WITHOUT THE WRITTEN PERMISSION OF NEXT ASSY USED ON Machined <INSERT COMPANY NAME HERE> IS PROHIBITED. APPLICATION DO NOT SCALE DRAWING SCALE: 1:1 WEIGHT: SHEET 2 OF 2 5 4 3 2 1
  • 48. 15.018 15.000R15 11 DETAIL A SCALE 2 : 1.5 7 60 53 120.00° 20 30 R1 51.340 A Eric Halfmann UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED: NAME DATE DIMENSIONS ARE IN MILLIMETERS DRAWN TOLERANCES: ANGULAR: MACH 0 30 CHECKED TITLE: ONE PLACE DECIMAL 0.5 Stage 1 Carrier ENG APPR. TWO PLACE DECIMAL 0.15 MFG APPR. SolidWorks Student Edition. PROPRIETARY AND CONFIDENTIAL THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS INTERPRET GEOMETRIC TOLERANCING PER: ASME Y14.5 MATERIAL Q.A. COMMENTS: SIZE DWG. NO. REV A 1020 HR Steel For Academic Use Only. DRAWING IS THE SOLE PROPERTY OF <INSERT COMPANY NAME HERE>. ANY FINISH Carrier_Stage1_Drawing REPRODUCTION IN PART OR AS A WHOLE WITHOUT THE WRITTEN PERMISSION OF NEXT ASSY USED ON Machined <INSERT COMPANY NAME HERE> IS PROHIBITED. APPLICATION DO NOT SCALE DRAWING SCALE: 1:4 WEIGHT: SHEET 1 OF 2 5 4 3 2 1
  • 49. R3.050 5 5 27 B27.8M - 3DM1-15 (External Retaining Ring Groove) R0.500 7.475 DETAIL B 2.100R DETAIL C 17.000 7.455 16.989 SCALE 2 : 1 SCALE 2 : 1.5 6.500 B27.7M - 3DM1-15 B C (Internal Retaining Ring Groove) 18 D 0.500 DETAIL D SCALE 2 : 1.5 Eric Halfmann UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED: NAME DATE DIMENSIONS ARE IN MILLIMETERS DRAWN TOLERANCES: ANGULAR: MACH 0 30 CHECKED TITLE: ONE PLACE DECIMAL 0.5 Stage 1 Carrier ENG APPR. TWO PLACE DECIMAL 0.15 MFG APPR. SolidWorks Student Edition. PROPRIETARY AND CONFIDENTIAL THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS INTERPRET GEOMETRIC TOLERANCING PER: ASME Y14.5 MATERIAL Q.A. COMMENTS: SIZE DWG. NO. REV A 1020 HR Steel For Academic Use Only. DRAWING IS THE SOLE PROPERTY OF <INSERT COMPANY NAME HERE>. ANY FINISH Carrier_Stage1_Drawing REPRODUCTION IN PART OR AS A WHOLE WITHOUT THE WRITTEN PERMISSION OF NEXT ASSY USED ON Machined <INSERT COMPANY NAME HERE> IS PROHIBITED. APPLICATION DO NOT SCALE DRAWING SCALE: 1:4 WEIGHT: SHEET 2 OF 2 5 4 3 2 1
  • 50. R0.500 54 R2 7 20 R1 5 2.350 DETAIL C SCALE 2 : 1.5 50 30 90.00° 15.018 15.000 C A 11 40 8.475 R 20.000 8.455 DETAIL A 19.987 SCALE 2 : 1.5 Eric Halfmann UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED: NAME DATER20 DIMENSIONS ARE IN MILLIMETERS DRAWN TOLERANCES: ANGULAR: MACH 0 30 CHECKED TITLE: ONE PLACE DECIMAL 0.5 Stage 2 Carrier ENG APPR. TWO PLACE DECIMAL 0.15 MFG APPR. SolidWorks Student Edition. PROPRIETARY AND CONFIDENTIAL THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS INTERPRET GEOMETRIC TOLERANCING PER: ASME Y14.5 MATERIAL Q.A. COMMENTS: SIZE DWG. NO. REV A 1020 HR Steel For Academic Use Only. DRAWING IS THE SOLE PROPERTY OF <INSERT COMPANY NAME HERE>. ANY FINISH Carrier_Stage2_Drawing REPRODUCTION IN PART OR AS A WHOLE WITHOUT THE WRITTEN PERMISSION OF NEXT ASSY USED ON Machined <INSERT COMPANY NAME HERE> IS PROHIBITED. APPLICATION DO NOT SCALE DRAWING SCALE: 1:4 WEIGHT: SHEET 1 OF 2 5 4 3 2 1
  • 51. 6.500 0.500 18 B27.7 - 3DM1 - 15 (Internal Retaining Ring Groove) DETAIL E SCALE 2 : 1.5 E 30 D R3.050 2.500 DETAIL D SCALE 2 : 1 B27.8 - 3DM1 -15 (External Retaining Ring Groove) Eric Halfmann UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED: NAME DATE DIMENSIONS ARE IN MILLIMETERS DRAWN TOLERANCES: ANGULAR: MACH 0 30 CHECKED TITLE: ONE PLACE DECIMAL 0.5 Stage 2 Carrier ENG APPR. TWO PLACE DECIMAL 0.15 MFG APPR.SolidWorks Student Edition. PROPRIETARY AND CONFIDENTIAL THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS INTERPRET GEOMETRIC TOLERANCING PER: ASME Y14.5 MATERIAL Q.A. COMMENTS: SIZE DWG. NO. REV A 1020 HR SteelFor Academic Use Only. DRAWING IS THE SOLE PROPERTY OF <INSERT COMPANY NAME HERE>. ANY FINISH Carrier_Stage2_Drawing REPRODUCTION IN PART OR AS A WHOLE WITHOUT THE WRITTEN PERMISSION OF NEXT ASSY USED ON Machined <INSERT COMPANY NAME HERE> IS PROHIBITED. APPLICATION DO NOT SCALE DRAWING SCALE: 1:4 WEIGHT: SHEET 2 OF 2 5 4 3 2 1
  • 52. R0.250 x 2 1 2 B27.8M - 3DM1 - 10 x 2 (External Retaining Ring Groove) R1 x 2 10.000 9.991 1 18 1 R5 10.000 12 9.991 22 26 34 Eric Halfmann UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED: NAME DATE DIMENSIONS ARE IN MILLIMETERS DRAWN TOLERANCES: ANGULAR: MACH 0 30 CHECKED TITLE: ONE PLACE DECIMAL 0.5 ENG APPR. Planet Gear Shaft TWO PLACE DECIMAL 0.15 MFG APPR. SolidWorks Student Edition. PROPRIETARY AND CONFIDENTIAL THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS INTERPRET GEOMETRIC TOLERANCING PER: ASME Y14.5 MATERIAL Q.A. COMMENTS: SIZE DWG. NO. REV A 1020 HR Steel For Academic Use Only. DRAWING IS THE SOLE PROPERTY OF <INSERT COMPANY NAME HERE>. ANY FINISH Planet_Gear_Shaft_Drawing REPRODUCTION IN PART OR AS A WHOLE WITHOUT THE WRITTEN PERMISSION OF NEXT ASSY USED ON Machined <INSERT COMPANY NAME HERE> IS PROHIBITED. APPLICATION DO NOT SCALE DRAWING SCALE: 2:1 WEIGHT: SHEET 1 OF 1 5 4 3 2 1
  • 53. Catalog Number: SS1-40 Spur Gear (from qtcgears.com) 21.101 Eric Halfmann UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED: NAME DATE DIMENSIONS ARE IN MILLIMETERS DRAWN TOLERANCES: ANGULAR: MACH 0 30 CHECKED TITLE: ONE PLACE DECIMAL 0.5 Planet Gear ENG APPR. TWO PLACE DECIMAL 0.15 MFG APPR. SolidWorks Student Edition. PROPRIETARY AND CONFIDENTIAL THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS INTERPRET GEOMETRIC TOLERANCING PER: ASME Y14.5 MATERIAL Q.A. COMMENTS: SIZE DWG. NO. REV For Academic Use Only. A DRAWING IS THE SOLE PROPERTY OF <INSERT COMPANY NAME HERE>. ANY REPRODUCTION IN PART OR AS A WHOLE NEXT ASSY USED ON FINISH SG_40mm_40T_Drawing WITHOUT THE WRITTEN PERMISSION OF <INSERT COMPANY NAME HERE> IS PROHIBITED. APPLICATION DO NOT SCALE DRAWING SCALE: 1:1 WEIGHT: SHEET 1 OF 1 5 4 3 2 1
  • 54. Metric Spur Gear 1M 80T 20PA 10FW -S80O40H30L15.0S1 (from SolidWorks Toolbox) 10 20 5 2.729 40 7.475 R 7.455 Eric Halfmann UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED: NAME DATE DIMENSIONS ARE IN MILLIMETERS DRAWN Stage 1 TOLERANCES: ANGULAR: MACH 0 30 CHECKED TITLE: ONE PLACE DECIMAL 0.5 Sun Gear ENG APPR. TWO PLACE DECIMAL 0.15 MFG APPR.SolidWorks Student Edition. PROPRIETARY AND CONFIDENTIAL THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS INTERPRET GEOMETRIC TOLERANCING PER: ASME Y14.5 MATERIAL Q.A. COMMENTS: SIZE DWG. NO. REVFor Academic Use Only. A DRAWING IS THE SOLE PROPERTY OF <INSERT COMPANY NAME HERE>. ANY Metric Spur Gear 1M 80T 20 REPRODUCTION IN PART OR AS A WHOLE FINISH 10FW-S80O40H30L15.0S1 WITHOUT THE WRITTEN PERMISSION OF NEXT ASSY USED ON <INSERT COMPANY NAME HERE> IS PROHIBITED. APPLICATION DO NOT SCALE DRAWING SCALE: 1:1 WEIGHT: SHEET 1 OF 1 5 4 3 2 1
  • 55. Metric Spur Gear: 1M 60T 10FW --S60O40H30L15.0S1 (from SolidWorks Toolbox) 10 20 52.729 40 7.475 R 7.455 Eric Halfmann UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED: NAME DATE DIMENSIONS ARE IN MILLIMETERS DRAWN TOLERANCES: ANGULAR: MACH 0 30 CHECKED TITLE: ONE PLACE DECIMAL 0.5 ENG APPR. Stage 2 Sun Gear TWO PLACE DECIMAL 0.15 MFG APPR.SolidWorks Student Edition. PROPRIETARY AND CONFIDENTIAL THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS INTERPRET GEOMETRIC TOLERANCING PER: ASME Y14.5 MATERIAL Q.A. COMMENTS: SIZE DWG. NO. REVFor Academic Use Only. A DRAWING IS THE SOLE PROPERTY OF <INSERT COMPANY NAME HERE>. ANY FINISH Metric - Spur Gear 1M 60T 20 PA REPRODUCTION IN PART OR AS A WHOLE WITHOUT THE WRITTEN PERMISSION OF NEXT ASSY USED ON 10FW- - S60O40H30L15.0S1 <INSERT COMPANY NAME HERE> IS PROHIBITED. APPLICATION DO NOT SCALE DRAWING SCALE: 1:1 WEIGHT: SHEET 1 OF 1 5 4 3 2 1
  • 56. Metric Internal Spur Gear 1M 160T 20PA 10FW --S160S180OD 1.0AF (from SolidWorks Toolbox) 10 Eric Halfmann UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED: NAME DATE DIMENSIONS ARE IN MILLIMETERS DRAWN TOLERANCES: ANGULAR: MACH 0 30 CHECKED TITLE: ONE PLACE DECIMAL 0.5 Stage 1 Internal ENG APPR. TWO PLACE DECIMAL 0.15 MFG APPR.SolidWorks Student Edition. PROPRIETARY AND CONFIDENTIAL THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS INTERPRET GEOMETRIC TOLERANCING PER: ASME Y14.5 MATERIAL Q.A. COMMENTS: Spur Gear SIZE DWG. NO. REVFor Academic Use Only. A 1M 160T 20PA Gear DRAWING IS THE SOLE PROPERTY OF <INSERT COMPANY NAME HERE>. ANY REPRODUCTION IN PART OR AS A WHOLE FINISH Internal Spur WITHOUT THE WRITTEN PERMISSION OF NEXT ASSY USED ON 10 FW <INSERT COMPANY NAME HERE> IS PROHIBITED. APPLICATION DO NOT SCALE DRAWING SCALE: 1:2 WEIGHT: SHEET 1 OF 1 5 4 3 2 1
  • 57. Metric Internal Spur Gear 1M 140T 20PA 10FW -S140S160OD1.AF (from SolidWorks Toolbox) 10 Eric Halfmann UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED: NAME DATE DIMENSIONS ARE IN MILLIMETERS DRAWN TOLERANCES: ANGULAR: MACH 0 30 CHECKED TITLE: ONE PLACE DECIMAL 0.5 ENG APPR. Stage 2 Internal TWO PLACE DECIMAL 0.15 MFG APPR.SolidWorks Student Edition. PROPRIETARY AND CONFIDENTIAL THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS INTERPRET GEOMETRIC TOLERANCING PER: ASME Y14.5 MATERIAL Q.A. COMMENTS: Spur Gear SIZE DWG. NO. REVFor Academic Use Only. A DRAWING IS THE SOLE PROPERTY OF <INSERT COMPANY NAME HERE>. ANY REPRODUCTION IN PART OR AS A WHOLE FINISH Internal Spur Gear WITHOUT THE WRITTEN PERMISSION OF NEXT ASSY USED ON 1M 140T 20PA 10FW <INSERT COMPANY NAME HERE> IS PROHIBITED. APPLICATION DO NOT SCALE DRAWING SCALE: 1:2 WEIGHT: SHEET 1 OF 1 5 4 3 2 1
  • 58. 2 4x2 R11 R11.500 47 16.500 20.00° 20.00° 4x3R89 79.505 4x2 73.505 4.500 5 2.500 4 9 Eric Halfmann UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED: NAME DATE DIMENSIONS ARE IN MILLIMETERS DRAWN TOLERANCES: ANGULAR: MACH 0 30 CHECKED TITLE: ONE PLACE DECIMAL 0.5 ENG APPR. Middle Bearing TWO PLACE DECIMAL 0.15 MFG APPR. SolidWorks Student Edition. PROPRIETARY AND CONFIDENTIAL THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS INTERPRET GEOMETRIC TOLERANCING PER: ASME Y14.5 MATERIAL Q.A. COMMENTS: Column SIZE DWG. NO. REV A 6061 Aluminum For Academic Use Only. DRAWING IS THE SOLE PROPERTY OF <INSERT COMPANY NAME HERE>. ANY FINISH MiddleBearingColumn_Drawing REPRODUCTION IN PART OR AS A WHOLE WITHOUT THE WRITTEN PERMISSION OF NEXT ASSY USED ON Machined <INSERT COMPANY NAME HERE> IS PROHIBITED. APPLICATION DO NOT SCALE DRAWING SCALE: 1:1 WEIGHT: SHEET 1 OF 1 5 4 3 2 1
  • 59. 23 4.500 4 4x3 23.500 43 47 R13.500 10.149 R11.500 9 12.500 R11 Eric Halfmann UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED: NAME DATE DIMENSIONS ARE IN MILLIMETERS DRAWN TOLERANCES: ANGULAR: MACH 0 30 CHECKED TITLE: ONE PLACE DECIMAL 0.5 ENG APPR. Middle Bearing TWO PLACE DECIMAL 0.15 MFG APPR.SolidWorks Student Edition. PROPRIETARY AND CONFIDENTIAL THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS INTERPRET GEOMETRIC TOLERANCING PER: ASME Y14.5 MATERIAL Q.A. COMMENTS: Retaining SIZE DWG. NO. REV A 6061 AluminumFor Academic Use Only. DRAWING IS THE SOLE PROPERTY OF <INSERT COMPANY NAME HERE>. ANY FINISH MiddleBearingTopPiece_Drawing REPRODUCTION IN PART OR AS A WHOLE WITHOUT THE WRITTEN PERMISSION OF NEXT ASSY USED ON Machined <INSERT COMPANY NAME HERE> IS PROHIBITED. APPLICATION DO NOT SCALE DRAWING SCALE: 2:1 WEIGHT: SHEET 1 OF 1 5 4 3 2 1
  • 60. R95 4 R97 3 18 4x2 25 3 11 14 Eric Halfmann UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED: NAME DATE DIMENSIONS ARE IN MILLIMETERS DRAWN TOLERANCES: ANGULAR: MACH 0 30 CHECKED TITLE: ONE PLACE DECIMAL 0.5 Gearbox Feet ENG APPR. TWO PLACE DECIMAL 0.15 MFG APPR.SolidWorks Student Edition. PROPRIETARY AND CONFIDENTIAL THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS INTERPRET GEOMETRIC TOLERANCING PER: ASME Y14.5 MATERIAL Q.A. COMMENTS: SIZE DWG. NO. REV A 1020 HR SteelFor Academic Use Only. DRAWING IS THE SOLE PROPERTY OF <INSERT COMPANY NAME HERE>. ANY REPRODUCTION IN PART OR AS A WHOLE FINISH GearBox_Feet_Drawing WITHOUT THE WRITTEN PERMISSION OF NEXT ASSY USED ON Machined <INSERT COMPANY NAME HERE> IS PROHIBITED. APPLICATION DO NOT SCALE DRAWING SCALE: 2:1 WEIGHT: SHEET 1 OF 1 5 4 3 2 1
  • 61. ITEM NO. PART NUMBER DESCRIPTION QTY. 1 Metric - Internal spur gear 1M 160T 1 20PA 10FW ---S160S180OD 1.0AF 2 Metric - Spur gear 1M 80T 20PA 10FW 1 ---S80O40H30L15.0S1 3 Stage 1 Carrier 1 4 SG_40mm_40T 3 5 InputShaft_Stage1 1 6 AFBMA 20.1 - 37-10 - 20,SI,NC,20_68 10mm Bore Bearing 3 7 Planet_Gear_Shaft 3 8 B27.8M - 3DM1-15 External Retaining Ring 1 1 7 6 5 3 8 2 4 Eric Halfmann UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED: NAME DATE DIMENSIONS ARE IN MILLIMETERS DRAWN TOLERANCES: ANGULAR: MACH 0 30 CHECKED TITLE: ONE PLACE DECIMAL 0.5 ENG APPR. Stage 1 Gear TWO PLACE DECIMAL 0.15 MFG APPR. SolidWorks Student Edition. PROPRIETARY AND CONFIDENTIAL THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS INTERPRET GEOMETRIC TOLERANCING PER: ASME Y14.5 MATERIAL Q.A. COMMENTS: Assembly SIZE DWG. NO. REV For Academic Use Only. A DRAWING IS THE SOLE PROPERTY OF <INSERT COMPANY NAME HERE>. ANY FINISH Stage1Assembly_Drawing REPRODUCTION IN PART OR AS A WHOLE WITHOUT THE WRITTEN PERMISSION OF NEXT ASSY USED ON <INSERT COMPANY NAME HERE> IS PROHIBITED. APPLICATION DO NOT SCALE DRAWING SCALE: 1:4 WEIGHT: SHEET 1 OF 1 5 4 3 2 1
  • 62. ITEM NO. PART NUMBER DESCRIPTION QTY. 1 Metric - Internal spur gear 1M 140T 1 20PA 10FW ---S140S160OD 1.0AF 2 Carrier_Stage2 1 3 SG_40mm_40T 4 4 Metric - Spur gear 1M 60T 20PA 1 10FW ---S60O40H30L15.0S1 5 Planet_Gear_Shaft 4 6 AFBMA 20.1 - 37-10 - 10mm Bore Bearing 4 20,SI,NC,20_68 2 3 4 5 6 1 Eric Halfmann UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED: NAME DATE DIMENSIONS ARE IN MILLIMETERS DRAWN TOLERANCES: ANGULAR: MACH 0 30 CHECKED TITLE: ONE PLACE DECIMAL 0.5 ENG APPR. Stage 2 TWO PLACE DECIMAL 0.15 MFG APPR. SolidWorks Student Edition. PROPRIETARY AND CONFIDENTIAL THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS INTERPRET GEOMETRIC TOLERANCING PER: ASME Y14.5 MATERIAL Q.A. COMMENTS: Gear Assembly SIZE DWG. NO. REV For Academic Use Only. A DRAWING IS THE SOLE PROPERTY OF <INSERT COMPANY NAME HERE>. ANY REPRODUCTION IN PART OR AS A WHOLE FINISH Stage2Assembly_Drawing WITHOUT THE WRITTEN PERMISSION OF NEXT ASSY USED ON <INSERT COMPANY NAME HERE> IS PROHIBITED. APPLICATION DO NOT SCALE DRAWING SCALE: 1:4 WEIGHT: SHEET 1 OF 1 5 4 3 2 1
  • 63. AFBMA 20.1 - 37-17 - 28,DE,NC,28_68 AFBMA 20.1 - 37-20 - 28,DE,NC,28_68AFBMA 20.1 - 37-17 - 28,DE,NC,28_68 (20mm bore bearing)(17mm bore bearing)Stage 1 Gear Assembly Stage 2 Gear Assembly Eric Halfmann UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED: NAME DATE DIMENSIONS ARE IN MILLIMETERS DRAWN TOLERANCES: ANGULAR: MACH 0 30 CHECKED TITLE: ONE PLACE DECIMAL 0.5 Gear Assembly ENG APPR. TWO PLACE DECIMAL 0.15 MFG APPR.SolidWorks Student Edition. PROPRIETARY AND CONFIDENTIAL THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS INTERPRET GEOMETRIC TOLERANCING PER: ASME Y14.5 MATERIAL Q.A. COMMENTS: SIZE DWG. NO. REVFor Academic Use Only. A DRAWING IS THE SOLE PROPERTY OF <INSERT COMPANY NAME HERE>. ANY FINISH GearAssembly_Drawing REPRODUCTION IN PART OR AS A WHOLE WITHOUT THE WRITTEN PERMISSION OF NEXT ASSY USED ON <INSERT COMPANY NAME HERE> IS PROHIBITED. APPLICATION DO NOT SCALE DRAWING SCALE: 1:4 WEIGHT: SHEET 1 OF 1 5 4 3 2 1
  • 64. Center Bearing Top Retaining Piece Gear AssemblyLower Connecting Piece Gasket x 2 Lower Housing Center Bearing Feet x 4 Column Eric Halfmann UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED: NAME DATE DIMENSIONS ARE IN MILLIMETERS DRAWN TOLERANCES: ANGULAR: MACH 0 30 CHECKED TITLE: ONE PLACE DECIMAL 0.5 ENG APPR. Gearbox Assembly TWO PLACE DECIMAL 0.15 MFG APPR.SolidWorks Student Edition. PROPRIETARY AND CONFIDENTIAL THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS INTERPRET GEOMETRIC TOLERANCING PER: ASME Y14.5 MATERIAL Q.A. COMMENTS: w/o upper housing SIZE DWG. NO. REVFor Academic Use Only. A DRAWING IS THE SOLE PROPERTY OF <INSERT COMPANY NAME HERE>. ANY REPRODUCTION IN PART OR AS A WHOLE FINISH Gear Box Assembly WITHOUT THE WRITTEN PERMISSION OF NEXT ASSY USED ON <INSERT COMPANY NAME HERE> IS PROHIBITED. APPLICATION DO NOT SCALE DRAWING SCALE: 1:8 WEIGHT: SHEET 1 OF 1 5 4 3 2 1
  • 65. Upper Housing Upper Connecting Gear Assembly w/o Upper Housing and Upper Connecting Eric Halfmann UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED: NAME DATE DIMENSIONS ARE IN MILLIMETERS DRAWN TOLERANCES: ANGULAR: MACH 0 30 CHECKED TITLE: ONE PLACE DECIMAL 0.5 ENG APPR. Gearbox Assembly TWO PLACE DECIMAL 0.15 MFG APPR.SolidWorks Student Edition. PROPRIETARY AND CONFIDENTIAL THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS INTERPRET GEOMETRIC TOLERANCING PER: ASME Y14.5 MATERIAL Q.A. COMMENTS: SIZE DWG. NO. REVFor Academic Use Only. A DRAWING IS THE SOLE PROPERTY OF <INSERT COMPANY NAME HERE>. ANY FINISH GearBox_Assembly_Drawing REPRODUCTION IN PART OR AS A WHOLE WITHOUT THE WRITTEN PERMISSION OF NEXT ASSY USED ON <INSERT COMPANY NAME HERE> IS PROHIBITED. APPLICATION DO NOT SCALE DRAWING SCALE: 1:8 WEIGHT: SHEET 1 OF 1 5 4 3 2 1