Germany Between 1929 and 1939<br />Haley and Kara			                                                  Humanities 20-1 <br ...
1929<br /><ul><li>Wall street crashed, thus, the great depression began. Hitler now had an opportunity to take over control.
The Nazi party membership has surpassed 150 000 followers.</li></ul>1930<br /><ul><li>Hitler and the Nazi party started a ...
On election day, the Nazi party went from being the smallest to second largest political party in Germany. They gained ove...
Hitler’s half niece/love interest, GeliRaubal, committed suicide at the age of 31. </li></li></ul><li>1932<br /><ul><li>Hi...
The re-election ended in 36% for Hitler and 53% for Hindenburg. So the 85 year old Hindenburg was re-elected. </li></ul>19...
The Nazi’s convinced people to boycott Jewish businesses and burn books written by Jews. </li></ul>1934<br /><ul><li>The S...
President Hindenburg died, thus leaving all power to Hitler, now known as the Furher. </li></li></ul><li>1935<br /><ul><li...
Hitler now sees how influential he is and how much the German people will listen to him, thus, he becomes more risky with ...
 Over 18 000 Germans were sent to Spain to fight for Spanish General Francisco Franco.</li></ul>1937<br /><ul><li>Entartet...
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Germany between 1929 and 1939

  1. 1. Germany Between 1929 and 1939<br />Haley and Kara Humanities 20-1 <br />February 3rd<br />
  2. 2. 1929<br /><ul><li>Wall street crashed, thus, the great depression began. Hitler now had an opportunity to take over control.
  3. 3. The Nazi party membership has surpassed 150 000 followers.</li></ul>1930<br /><ul><li>Hitler and the Nazi party started a rampage of speeches, meetings and posters.
  4. 4. On election day, the Nazi party went from being the smallest to second largest political party in Germany. They gained over 18% of the total votes.</li></ul>1931<br /><ul><li>The official Nazi Brown House opened in Munich
  5. 5. Hitler’s half niece/love interest, GeliRaubal, committed suicide at the age of 31. </li></li></ul><li>1932<br /><ul><li>Hitler ran against President Hindenburg and received 30% of the votes and Hindenburg only 49%, thus a fun-off election.
  6. 6. The re-election ended in 36% for Hitler and 53% for Hindenburg. So the 85 year old Hindenburg was re-elected. </li></ul>1933<br /><ul><li>Hitler was appointed chancellor, skyrocketing the Nazi power.
  7. 7. The Nazi’s convinced people to boycott Jewish businesses and burn books written by Jews. </li></ul>1934<br /><ul><li>The SA (the brown shirts) had risen to 2.5 million men, completely overpowering the regular army.
  8. 8. President Hindenburg died, thus leaving all power to Hitler, now known as the Furher. </li></li></ul><li>1935<br /><ul><li>Hitler had created and enforced the Nuremberg Laws, which basically stripped the Jews of their civil rights.
  9. 9. Hitler now sees how influential he is and how much the German people will listen to him, thus, he becomes more risky with his actions. </li></ul>1936<br /><ul><li>The Olympics are held in Berlin this year, and Hitler takes the publicity to promote his Nazism.
  10. 10. Over 18 000 Germans were sent to Spain to fight for Spanish General Francisco Franco.</li></ul>1937<br /><ul><li>EntarteteKunst; a term used by the Nazi regime in Germany that refers to Modern Art. In that time, modern art was considered to be anti-German or Jewish Bolshevist in nature. Being so, degenerate/modern art was banned and artists that created such pieces were subjected to sanctions.
  11. 11. Over 18 000 Germans were sent to Spain to fight for Spanish General Francisco Franco.</li></li></ul><li>1938<br /><ul><li>Germany has now taken over Austria
  12. 12. A “free for all” against the Jews took place. About 100 were killed and nearly 30 000 were arrested and thrown into concentration camps. </li></ul>1939<br /><ul><li>Hitler has now invaded Poland, marking the beginning of WW1.
  13. 13. During the outbreak of the war and amidst they turmoil of the tragedies, Hitler ordered a “mercy killing” of both the disabled and sick. Their execution was determined by a simple questionnaire that was conducted by three “medical experts.” </li></li></ul><li>The Impact That Nationalism Had…<br />1929:Nationalism is the root belief of the Nazi party, having more people become nationalists led to more Nazi’s. The Wall Street Crash, being the cause of the Great Depression, was impacted by nationalism because it was an event that caused desperation amongst the people. Desperate times call for desperate measures, which is why the ultra-nationalistic Nazi’s became so appealing to the citizens. <br />1930: Nationalism had led Hitler to his very strong and controversial beliefs. The overwhelming need within him to have the world hear his opinion pushed him to become the passionate, ambitious leader he was. The timing and his raw skill as a leader went perfect together. Nationalism was spreading like wildfire, and this became blatantly obvious when the Nazi party went from the smallest to the second largest political group in Germany.<br />1931: Things began to work well for Hitler. He was gaining the trust of the campaign and the people were beginning to follow his nationalistic ideologies. When the Nazi Brown House opened in Munich, it only reinforced the strength of the rapidly growing committee. At the time of GeliRaubal’s death, Hitler was just beginning his walk to fame. However, his beliefs had driven the only woman he ever loved to feel her only escape was death. This tragedy gave him a stronger will to strive for success. He needed something to live for after her death.<br />
  14. 14. 1932: Nationalism, becoming so popular, led to Hitler’s close call to the presidential title. Being so close, also gave him the confidence and the publicity he needed in order to obtain complete power in the future.<br />1933: The appointing of Chancellor was a turning point in Hitler’s reign, in ways that gave him more power, popularity and trust. Nationalism was his drive the whole way, and people wanting these values, hoped he could give them what they wanted. Hitler, being held on such a high pedestal, took advantage of the people’s vulnerability and planted his seeds of anti-Semitism, convincing his fellow Germans to destroy the Jewish population, starting by boycotting their businesses, and burning their books. <br />1934: By this time Nationalistic Nazis had become the most powerful political party in Germany, which became apparent when the SA had more men than the regular army. This many people can easily reinforce the ideas and beliefs of their superior leader. Hindenburg's death was the complete end to Hitler’s wait for power. He had all power now and was willing to use it and manipulate his followers in order to complete his goal; demolish the anti-German population..<br />1935: The Nuremberg Laws were made because of Nationalism. Hitler believed German should only be Germans, it should be one nation in one area! Having others making the blood impure was unacceptable so these Laws allowed him to somewhat make the German population exclusive.<br />1936: Nationalism was almost ignored when 18000 Germans were sent to fight for the Spanish. Also, having the Olympics in Berlin gave Hitler another chance to use propaganda and publicize his Nazism. <br />
  15. 15. 1937: Nationalism led to Modern art being banned because it was said the style was un-German, making it unfit for the Nation.<br />1938: The nation was growing and taking power of Austria. Nationalists believed it to be as much of a German Country as Germany itself, so it too must be completely Nationalized. Also, having both places be Nationalist, they must both be Semite free! The free for all against the Jews took place.<br />1939: Hitler had become power hungry and could not get enough. He invaded Poland, in hopes of making his Nation even larger and more powerful, in hopes of taking the whole world eventually and creating It to be a place of clean, perfect, superior race. In order to filter out the unworthy he ordered the Mercy Killing which entitled the sick and disabled to death.<br />
  16. 16. Bibliography<br />Hitler and President Hindenburg. (2011). Retrieved February 2nd, 2011, from Corbis Images: http://www.corbisimages.com/Enlargement/BE033283.html<br />Incredible Images 4 U. (n.d.). Retrieved February 2nd, 2011, from Illustrated History: Relieve the Times: http://incredibleimages4u.blogspot.com/2010/02/rise-of-hitler-and-nazism-in-germany.html<br />Jones, A. (2002). Case Study: The Jewish Holocaust, 1933-45. Retrieved February 3rd, 2011, from Gendercide: http://www.gendercide.org/case_jews.html<br />McSmith, A. (2008, April 8). Aryan ideals, not ancient Greece, were the inspiration behind flame tradition. Retrieved February 3rd, 2011, from Independent: http://www.independent.ie/world-news/europe/aryan-ideals-not-ancient-greece-were-the-inspiration-behind-flame-tradition-1341714.html<br />Must Reads. (2009, August 8). Retrieved February 2nd, 2011, from Broadway Carl: http://broadwaycarl.blogspot.com/2009_08_02_archive.html<br />
  17. 17. The History Place. (1996). Retrieved January 2nd , 2011, from http://www.historyplace.com/worldwar2/riseofhitler/begins.htm<br />The Nazification of Germany. (2005). Retrieved February 2nd , 2011, from fcit.usf.edu: http://fcit.usf.edu/HOLOCAUST/timeline/nazifica.htm<br />The Telegraph. (2011). Retrieved February 2nd, 2011, from Second World War: Evacuating London: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/britainatwar/6056684/Second-World-War-evacuating-London.html?image=2<br />Timebase1931. (1997). Retrieved February 2nd, 2011, from Humanities-International: http://www.humanitas-international.org/holocaust/1931tbse.htm<br />Truth In Prophecy Timeline of Events. (n.d.). Retrieved February 2nd, 2011, from Truth In Prophecy: http://truthinprophecy.com/timeline/1920.php<br />Typhus - The Phantom Disease. (2004). Retrieved February 2nd, 2011, from VHO: http://www.vho.org/tr/2004/1/Humm84-88.html<br />
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