Computers Are Your Future                        Twelfth Edition         Chapter 3: Input/Output and StorageCopyright © 20...
Input/Output & StorageCopyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
Objectives • Explain the various types of keyboards   and the purpose of the special keys on   the keyboard, identify the ...
Objectives• Identify the two major types of printers  and indicate the advantages and  disadvantages of each.• Distinguish...
Objectives• List factors that affect hard disk  performance.• Explain how data is stored on flash  drives.Copyright © 2012...
Objectives• List and compare the various optical  storage media and devices available for  personal computers.• Describe s...
Input Devices:        Giving Commands• Input     o Data or instructions entered into a computer• Input device     o Hardwa...
Input Devices:        Giving Commands• Input device (con’t.)     o Keyboard     o Most common input device—enables data an...
Input Devices:        Giving Commands              • Click to edit Master text styles                   o Second level    ...
Input Devices:        Giving Commands• Key matrix     o Grid of circuits located under the keys• Character map     o Chart...
Input Devices:        Giving Commands• Insertion point     o Blinking vertical line, underscore, or highlighted box• Wirel...
Input Devices:        Giving Commands• Keyboards     o Connect with:     o Universal Serial Bus (USB) connector     o PS/2...
Input Devices:        Giving Commands• Special keyboard keys include:     o Cursor movement keys (arrow keys) —set of four...
Input Devices:               Giving Commands• Alternate keyboards  o Virtual (soft keyboard or on-screen keyboard)—     a ...
Input Devices:          Giving Commands• Alternate keyboards (con’t.) o Flexible keyboards —full-sized, lightweight portab...
Input Devices:        Giving Commands• Media center PCs  o All-in-one entertainment    devices  o Make it easy to access  ...
Input Devices:         Giving Commands• Pointing  device  o Controls an on-screen    pointer’s movements• Pointer  o On-sc...
Input Devices:        Giving Commands                                                         • Mice     o Optical—most po...
Input Devices:         Giving Commands• Mice alternatives     o   Trackball     o   Pointing stick     o   Touchpad (also ...
Input Devices:         Giving Commands• Alternative input devices include: o   Microphones for speech or voice recognition...
Input Devices:        Giving CommandsCopyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
Output Devices:     Engaging Our Senses                               • Output devices     o Enable users to see, hear, or...
Output Devices:     Engaging Our Senses• Monitors     o Display a temporary copy (soft copy) of       processed data     o...
Output Devices:     Engaging Our Senses• Monitors (con’t.)     o LCD (flat-panel) displays:     o Have a thin profile     ...
Output Devices:     Engaging Our Senses• Monitors (con’t.)     o Passive-matrix (Also known as dual scans)     o Least exp...
Output Devices:     Engaging Our Senses• Monitors (con’t.)     o Size is diagonal measurement     o Size is straightforwar...
Output Devices:     Engaging Our Senses • Resolution     o Refers to the sharpness of an image     o Number of pixels (pic...
Output Devices:       Engaging Our Senses• Field-emission displays (FEDs)   o Considered more rugged; better in harsh envi...
Output Devices:     Engaging Our Senses                                  • Organic light emitting                         ...
Output Devices:     Engaging Our Senses• Printers    o Supply a hard copy of output displayed on a computer’s      monitor...
Output Devices:     Engaging Our Senses• Printers (con’t.)   o Inkjet (nonimpact)—popular with home users   o Provide exce...
Output Devices:     Engaging Our Senses• Printers (con’t.)    o Laser (nonimpact)    o Use electrostatic reproductive tech...
Output Devices:     Engaging Our Senses• Printers (con’t.)    o Dot-matrix (impact)    o Older, less popular    o Used mos...
Output Devices:     Engaging Our Senses• Printers (con’t.)    o Thermal-transfer (dye sublimation printers)    o Thermal-w...
Output Devices:         Engaging Our Senses• Printers (con’t.)  o Photo  o Uses special ink and paper  o Often are inkjet ...
Output Devices:     Engaging Our Senses• Other output devices  include:    o   Speakers    o   LCD projectors    o   DLP (...
Storage: Holding Data        for Future Use• Storage     o Process of saving software and data     o Also called mass stor...
Storage: Holding Data        for Future Use• Storage devices    o Hardware that contains the tools to place data on      t...
Storage: Holding Data        for Future Use           • Click to edit Master text styles               o Second level     ...
Storage: Holding Data        for Future Use• Memory (RAM) versus  storage     o Storage devices retain data even if power ...
Storage: Holding Data        for Future Use• Memory (RAM)     o Primary memory     o Temporary holding area for items in u...
Storage: Holding Data        for Future Use• Hard disk drive (hard drive)  o Most important storage device  o High-capacit...
Storage: Holding Data        for Future Use• Platters—rapidly rotating disks on which programs,  data, and processed resul...
Storage: Holding Data        for Future Use              • Click to edit Master text styles                   o Second lev...
Storage: Holding Data        for Future Use• The computer’s operating system stores a file’s  name and its location on the...
Storage: Holding Data        for Future Use• Partitions    o Portion of a hard disk set aside as if it were a      physica...
Storage: Holding Data        for Future Use• Hard disk performance     o Affected by bad sectors—damaged portions of the  ...
Storage: Holding Data        for Future Use• Hard disk performance  (con’t.)     o Disk cache—type of cache memory     o C...
Storage: Holding Data        for Future Use• Network attached storage (NAS)     o Permits retrieval or storage of data by ...
Storage: Holding Data        for Future Use• Flash drive (solid-state drive  [SSD])     o Storage devices that use solid-s...
Storage: Holding Data        for Future Use• Hybrid hard drives (HHDs)     o Incorporate flash technology to speed up the ...
Storage: Holding Data        for Future Use• CD drives and DVD drives     o Optical storage devices     o Use laser beams ...
Storage: Holding Data        for Future UseCopyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
Storage: Holding Data        for Future Use Additional types of optical storageo CD-R (CD-recordable)o CD-RW (CD-rewritabl...
Storage: Holding Data        for Future Use • Protect your discs     o Do not expose discs to excessive heat or sunlight. ...
Storage: Holding Data        for Future Use• Solid-state storage devices    o No moving parts    o Nonvolatile• ExpressCar...
Storage: Holding Data         for Future Use• Flash memory cards o Solid-state storage device o Used with MP3 players,   s...
Storage: Holding Data          for Future Use• Smart card/chip  card/integrated circuit  card (ICC)  o Combines flash memo...
Storage: Holding Data        for Future Use• Holographic storage    o May make high-density storage possible    o Able to ...
Storage: Holding Data        for Future Use• Racetrack memory    o Under development—possible replacement for      flash m...
Storage: Holding Data        for Future Use• Backup• Copy of programs, data, and information created in one  secondary sto...
Summary • Explain the various types of keyboards   and the purpose of the special keys on   the keyboard, identify the com...
Summary • Identify the two major types of printers   and indicate the advantages and   disadvantages of each. • Distinguis...
Summary • List factors that affect hard disk   performance. • Explain how data is stored on flash   drives.Copyright © 201...
Summary• List and compare the various optical  storage media and devices available for  personal computers.• Describe soli...
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a     retrieval system, or transmitted, in a...
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  • Is ch3

    1. 1. Computers Are Your Future Twelfth Edition Chapter 3: Input/Output and StorageCopyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    2. 2. Input/Output & StorageCopyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    3. 3. Objectives • Explain the various types of keyboards and the purpose of the special keys on the keyboard, identify the commonly used pointing devices, and list alternative input devices. • List the types of monitors and the characteristics that determine a monitor’s quality.Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    4. 4. Objectives• Identify the two major types of printers and indicate the advantages and disadvantages of each.• Distinguish between memory and storage.• Discuss how storage media and devices are categorized and how data is stored on a hard drive.Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    5. 5. Objectives• List factors that affect hard disk performance.• Explain how data is stored on flash drives.Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    6. 6. Objectives• List and compare the various optical storage media and devices available for personal computers.• Describe solid-state storage devices and compare them with other types of storage devices.Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    7. 7. Input Devices: Giving Commands• Input o Data or instructions entered into a computer• Input device o Hardware that gives users the ability to enter data and instructions into the computer’s random access memory (RAM)Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    8. 8. Input Devices: Giving Commands• Input device (con’t.) o Keyboard o Most common input device—enables data and instruction entry through the use of a variety of keys o Enhanced keyboards—additional keys, such as media control buttons to adjust speaker volume, or Internet control buttons that open e-mail, a browser, or a search window with a single keystrokeCopyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    9. 9. Input Devices: Giving Commands • Click to edit Master text styles o Second level o Third level • Fourth level o Fifth levelCopyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    10. 10. Input Devices: Giving Commands• Key matrix o Grid of circuits located under the keys• Character map o Chart that tells the processor what key has been pressedCopyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    11. 11. Input Devices: Giving Commands• Insertion point o Blinking vertical line, underscore, or highlighted box• Wireless keyboards o Connect to the computer through infrared (IR), radio frequency (RF), or Bluetooth connectionsCopyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    12. 12. Input Devices: Giving Commands• Keyboards o Connect with: o Universal Serial Bus (USB) connector o PS/2 cable o Infrared o Radio frequency o BluetoothCopyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    13. 13. Input Devices: Giving Commands• Special keyboard keys include: o Cursor movement keys (arrow keys) —set of four keys that move the cursor up, down, right, or left o Toggle keys—either on or off o Function keys—perform specific actions depending on the program o Modifier keys—used for shortcutsCopyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    14. 14. Input Devices: Giving Commands• Alternate keyboards o Virtual (soft keyboard or on-screen keyboard)— a touch-sensitive screen; accepts input with a stylus or finger o Smartphone o Mini-keyboard—keys for each letter of the alphabet; option on many smartphones o Keypad—smaller, more compact, has keys that represent multiple letters o Virtual laser—used with devices as smartphones, an alternate way to do e-mail, word processing, spreadsheets Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    15. 15. Input Devices: Giving Commands• Alternate keyboards (con’t.) o Flexible keyboards —full-sized, lightweight portable devices o Wireless keyboards for media center PCs—allow users to control media components Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as
    16. 16. Input Devices: Giving Commands• Media center PCs o All-in-one entertainment devices o Make it easy to access photos, TV, movies, and online media by using a remote control o Uses o Remote controls o Remote miniature keyboardsCopyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    17. 17. Input Devices: Giving Commands• Pointing device o Controls an on-screen pointer’s movements• Pointer o On-screen symbol that signifies the command, input, or possible response Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as
    18. 18. Input Devices: Giving Commands • Mice o Optical—most popular pointing device o Travel—all the capabilities of a normal mouse, half the size o Wheel—has a wheel for easy vertical scrolling o Wireless—connects through an infrared or radio signal (RF) o Air—does not need to work on a surface, works as it moves through the airCopyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as
    19. 19. Input Devices: Giving Commands• Mice alternatives o Trackball o Pointing stick o Touchpad (also called a trackpad) o Click wheel o Joystick o Stylus o Touch screenCopyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    20. 20. Input Devices: Giving Commands• Alternative input devices include: o Microphones for speech or voice recognition o Scanner for optical character recognition (OCR) o Bar code reader o Optical mark reader (OMR) o Radio frequency identification (RFID reader) o Magnetic-ink character recognition (MICR reader) o Magnetic stripe care reader o Biometric input device o Digital cameras and digital video cameras o Webcams Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    21. 21. Input Devices: Giving CommandsCopyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    22. 22. Output Devices: Engaging Our Senses • Output devices o Enable users to see, hear, or feel the end result of processing operations o The two most popular output devices o Monitors (also called displays) o PrintersCopyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as
    23. 23. Output Devices: Engaging Our Senses• Monitors o Display a temporary copy (soft copy) of processed data o Types of monitors include: o Cathode-ray tube (CRT) —legacy technology o Liquid crystal display (LCD)Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    24. 24. Output Devices: Engaging Our Senses• Monitors (con’t.) o LCD (flat-panel) displays: o Have a thin profile o Are used with newer desktops and notebooks o Have largely replaced CRT monitors o May accommodate high-definition videoCopyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    25. 25. Output Devices: Engaging Our Senses• Monitors (con’t.) o Passive-matrix (Also known as dual scans) o Least expensive o Too slow for full-motion video o Electrical current charges groups of pixels o Active-matrix (also known as thin-film transistor [TFT] technology) o Used for better on-screen color quality o Charges each pixel individually as neededCopyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    26. 26. Output Devices: Engaging Our Senses• Monitors (con’t.) o Size is diagonal measurement o Size is straightforward for LCDs but more complex for CRTs. o Quoted size—the size of the screen o Viewable area—the area unobstructed by the housing o Both must be disclosed by the manufacturer.Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    27. 27. Output Devices: Engaging Our Senses • Resolution o Refers to the sharpness of an image o Number of pixels (picture elements) controls the resolution o Video Graphics Array (VGA) —lowest resolution standard (640 × 480) o Extended Graphics Array (XGA) —most used by computers today (1024 × 768)Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    28. 28. Output Devices: Engaging Our Senses• Field-emission displays (FEDs) o Considered more rugged; better in harsh environments o Operate similar to an LCD monitor o Tiny stationary carbon nanotubes illuminate each on- screen pixel• Televisions as monitors o High-definition (HDTVs) o Higher resolution (usually 1920 × 1080 or better) o Require a HDTV tuner o Needs a video card with digital video interface (DVI) or high-definition multimedia interface (HDMI) port on PCCopyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    29. 29. Output Devices: Engaging Our Senses • Organic light emitting diode (OLED) displays o Emit light rather than modulate transmitted or reflected light • Flexible OLED displays (FOLED) o Can be paper thin and appear as posters on the wall o Can be worn on wrist and used to watch movies or surf the WebCopyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    30. 30. Output Devices: Engaging Our Senses• Printers o Supply a hard copy of output displayed on a computer’s monitor o Types include: o Inkjet o Laser o Dot-matrix o Thermal-transfer (sometimes called dye sublimation printers) o Photo o PlottersCopyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    31. 31. Output Devices: Engaging Our Senses• Printers (con’t.) o Inkjet (nonimpact)—popular with home users o Provide excellent images—made up of small dots o Advantages: • Inexpensive • Generate professional color output • Disadvantages: • Relatively slowCopyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    32. 32. Output Devices: Engaging Our Senses• Printers (con’t.) o Laser (nonimpact) o Use electrostatic reproductive technology to produce high- quality output o Advantages: • High-resolution • Print faster than inkjet printers • Black-and-white printing costs less per page than inkjet printing o Disadvantages • Color laser printers more expensiveCopyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    33. 33. Output Devices: Engaging Our Senses• Printers (con’t.) o Dot-matrix (impact) o Older, less popular o Used mostly for printing multipart forms and backup copies o Advantages • Able to print 3,000 lines per minute o Disadvantages • Poor print quality • NoisyCopyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    34. 34. Output Devices: Engaging Our Senses• Printers (con’t.) o Thermal-transfer (dye sublimation printers) o Thermal-wax or direct thermal o Use heat process o Advantages • High-quality images from the high-quality thermal-wax printers • Popular for mobile printing o Disadvantages • High-quality thermal printers expensiveCopyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    35. 35. Output Devices: Engaging Our Senses• Printers (con’t.) o Photo o Uses special ink and paper o Often are inkjet printers o Prints directly from a digital camera or memory card o Plotters o Produce images through moving ink pens o Used for making oversized prints (i.e., maps, charts, blueprints) Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    36. 36. Output Devices: Engaging Our Senses• Other output devices include: o Speakers o LCD projectors o DLP (digital light-processing) projectors o Multifunction devicesCopyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as
    37. 37. Storage: Holding Data for Future Use• Storage o Process of saving software and data o Also called mass storage, auxiliary storage , or secondary storageCopyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    38. 38. Storage: Holding Data for Future Use• Storage devices o Hardware that contains the tools to place data on the recording media o Recording media—hold data o Hard disks o Floppy disks o Flash memory o CDs and DVDsCopyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    39. 39. Storage: Holding Data for Future Use • Click to edit Master text styles o Second level o Third level • Fourth level o Fifth levelCopyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    40. 40. Storage: Holding Data for Future Use• Memory (RAM) versus storage o Storage devices retain data even if power is turned off o Data stored in memory (RAM) will be lost o Storage devices are less expensive than memoryCopyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    41. 41. Storage: Holding Data for Future Use• Memory (RAM) o Primary memory o Temporary holding area for items in use o Primary storage• Storage devices o Required during the computer system’s start-up operations o Used as an output device for saving dataCopyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    42. 42. Storage: Holding Data for Future Use• Hard disk drive (hard drive) o Most important storage device o High-capacity, high-speed device o Considered secondary storage (online; fixed storage), compared with memory/RAM, which is categorized as primary storage o Random access storage devices —permit direct retrieval of desired data o Contain a coating of magnetic material used for data storageCopyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    43. 43. Storage: Holding Data for Future Use• Platters—rapidly rotating disks on which programs, data, and processed results are stored• Tracks—concentric bands on which data is recorded o Are divided into sectors o Two or more sectors is a cluster.Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    44. 44. Storage: Holding Data for Future Use • Click to edit Master text styles o Second level o Third level • Fourth level o Fifth levelCopyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    45. 45. Storage: Holding Data for Future Use• The computer’s operating system stores a file’s name and its location on the disk in a table.• New technology file system (NTFS) o The present system used for tracking file locations in: o Windows NT o Windows 2000 o Windows XP o Windows Vista o Windows 7Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    46. 46. Storage: Holding Data for Future Use• Partitions o Portion of a hard disk set aside as if it were a physically separate disk o Often used to house different operating systems o Allows users to use programs developed for different systemsCopyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    47. 47. Storage: Holding Data for Future Use• Hard disk performance o Affected by bad sectors—damaged portions of the disk that cannot reliably hold data o Positioning performance—how quickly the read/write head can get into position to transfer data o Transfer performance—how quickly the transfer is made from the disk to storageCopyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    48. 48. Storage: Holding Data for Future Use• Hard disk performance (con’t.) o Disk cache—type of cache memory o CPU looks here first before the hard disk o Using the disk cache speeds up data retrievalCopyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    49. 49. Storage: Holding Data for Future Use• Network attached storage (NAS) o Permits retrieval or storage of data by any computer connected to the network• Remote storage (Internet hard drive) o Storage on a server that is available through the InternetCopyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    50. 50. Storage: Holding Data for Future Use• Flash drive (solid-state drive [SSD]) o Storage devices that use solid-state circuitry; have no moving parts o Increasing in use• Flash memory o Nonvolatile electronic memory stored in blocks on a chip o Limited to 100,000 write cyclesCopyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    51. 51. Storage: Holding Data for Future Use• Hybrid hard drives (HHDs) o Incorporate flash technology to speed up the boot process• USB flash drives (memory stick, thumb drive, jump drive) o Popular portable or removable storage devices o Replace legacy technology of floppy disks and Zip disks o Do not require a device driver o Should be removed only when not actively in useCopyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    52. 52. Storage: Holding Data for Future Use• CD drives and DVD drives o Optical storage devices o Use laser beams to store data through: o Pits, the indentations, a binary 0 o Lands, the flat reflective areas, a binary 1• Optical discs o CD-ROM or DVD-ROM (compact or digital video disc read-only memory) o Data can be read, not altered o Most popular, least expensiveCopyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    53. 53. Storage: Holding Data for Future UseCopyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    54. 54. Storage: Holding Data for Future Use Additional types of optical storageo CD-R (CD-recordable)o CD-RW (CD-rewritable) o DVD+RW (DVD rewritable;o DVD+R (DVD recordable; plus) plus) o DVD-RW (DVD rewritable;o DVD-R (DVD recordable; dash) dash) o BD-ROM (Blu-ray Disc read only) o BD-R (BD recordable) o BD-RE (BDisc rewritable)Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as
    55. 55. Storage: Holding Data for Future Use • Protect your discs o Do not expose discs to excessive heat or sunlight. o Do not touch the underside of the disc—hold the edges. o Do not write on the label side of the disc with a hard implement. o Do not stack discs. o Store discs in cases when not in use.Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    56. 56. Storage: Holding Data for Future Use• Solid-state storage devices o No moving parts o Nonvolatile• ExpressCard o Notebook accessory—size of a credit card o Can be used as a modem, as extra memory, or as a network adapterCopyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    57. 57. Storage: Holding Data for Future Use• Flash memory cards o Solid-state storage device o Used with MP3 players, smartphones, digital cameras• Flash memory reader o Slot or compartment allows access to files stored on the card Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    58. 58. Storage: Holding Data for Future Use• Smart card/chip card/integrated circuit card (ICC) o Combines flash memory with a small microprocessor o Stores and processes information o Digital cash system —smart card application enables users to purchase a prepaid amount of electronically stored money Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    59. 59. Storage: Holding Data for Future Use• Holographic storage o May make high-density storage possible o Able to create 3-D images• Eye-Fi wireless memory card o Combines standard flash memory card features with wireless circuitry o Enables a direct wireless network connection to devices such as digital camerasCopyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    60. 60. Storage: Holding Data for Future Use• Racetrack memory o Under development—possible replacement for flash memory and hard drives o Will operate at higher speeds and consume less powerCopyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    61. 61. Storage: Holding Data for Future Use• Backup• Copy of programs, data, and information created in one secondary storage medium duplicated to another o Secondary storage devices, such as USB drives and portable (external) hard drives, can be damaged or “lost.” o Prevents permanent loss of programs, data, and information o Keep on a regular scheduleCopyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    62. 62. Summary • Explain the various types of keyboards and the purpose of the special keys on the keyboard, identify the commonly used pointing devices, and list alternative input devices. • List the types of monitors and the characteristics that determine a monitor’s quality.Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    63. 63. Summary • Identify the two major types of printers and indicate the advantages and disadvantages of each. • Distinguish between memory and storage. • Discuss how storage media and devices are categorized and how data is stored on a hard drive.Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    64. 64. Summary • List factors that affect hard disk performance. • Explain how data is stored on flash drives.Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    65. 65. Summary• List and compare the various optical storage media and devices available for personal computers.• Describe solid-state storage devices and compare them with other types of storage devices.Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing
    66. 66. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the publisher. Printed in the United States of America. Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc.   Publishing as Prentice HallCopyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing

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