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Kublai In 10 Minutes

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Slides to accompany the presentation of Kublai at Public Services 2.0, Brussels, March 2009. For a video of the talk accompanying the slides, see …

Slides to accompany the presentation of Kublai at Public Services 2.0, Brussels, March 2009. For a video of the talk accompanying the slides, see http://cdn1.ustream.tv/swf/4/viewer.182.swf?vid=1259529

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  • The Ministry has a problem: despite the deployment of very significant financial and economic resources over more then 40 years, some areas (notably in Mezzogiorno) are still lagging behind.
  • We thought it would be a good idea to get creative people involved in development policy. They can look at the places they live in a new way, and embody a strong potential for change. The problem is that it is not easy to get them involved. They have communication channels, meeting places and codes that are very different - and very far - from those of development policies.
    Why do they not get more involved?
  • We thought it would be a good idea to get creative people involved in development policy. They can look at the places they live in a new way, and embody a strong potential for change. The problem is that it is not easy to get them involved. They have communication channels, meeting places and codes that are very different - and very far - from those of development policies.
    Why do they not get more involved?
  • We thought it would be a good idea to get creative people involved in development policy. They can look at the places they live in a new way, and embody a strong potential for change. The problem is that it is not easy to get them involved. They have communication channels, meeting places and codes that are very different - and very far - from those of development policies.
    Why do they not get more involved?
  • Development policies do call for projects and fund them, but they seldom engage in meaningful conversation about project content (“what to do”). What they do is bring up buzzwords, but creative people often find them vague (“equal opportunities”) when not downright meaningless (“mainstreaming”). Also, they find that procedures are too complicated, drowning would-be doers in a sea of paperwork - while favouring consultants who can build proposals by paying lip service the right buzzwords.
    We think development policies are sending the wrong signals, by favouring form over content. And when you send the wrong signals, the wrong people show up: development policies are too often deployed by people who are at best bored, at worst cynical and rent-seeking.
  • Development policies do call for projects and fund them, but they seldom engage in meaningful conversation about project content (“what to do”). What they do is bring up buzzwords, but creative people often find them vague (“equal opportunities”) when not downright meaningless (“mainstreaming”). Also, they find that procedures are too complicated, drowning would-be doers in a sea of paperwork - while favouring consultants who can build proposals by paying lip service the right buzzwords.
    We think development policies are sending the wrong signals, by favouring form over content. And when you send the wrong signals, the wrong people show up: development policies are too often deployed by people who are at best bored, at worst cynical and rent-seeking.
  • Development policies do call for projects and fund them, but they seldom engage in meaningful conversation about project content (“what to do”). What they do is bring up buzzwords, but creative people often find them vague (“equal opportunities”) when not downright meaningless (“mainstreaming”). Also, they find that procedures are too complicated, drowning would-be doers in a sea of paperwork - while favouring consultants who can build proposals by paying lip service the right buzzwords.
    We think development policies are sending the wrong signals, by favouring form over content. And when you send the wrong signals, the wrong people show up: development policies are too often deployed by people who are at best bored, at worst cynical and rent-seeking.
  • Development policies do call for projects and fund them, but they seldom engage in meaningful conversation about project content (“what to do”). What they do is bring up buzzwords, but creative people often find them vague (“equal opportunities”) when not downright meaningless (“mainstreaming”). Also, they find that procedures are too complicated, drowning would-be doers in a sea of paperwork - while favouring consultants who can build proposals by paying lip service the right buzzwords.
    We think development policies are sending the wrong signals, by favouring form over content. And when you send the wrong signals, the wrong people show up: development policies are too often deployed by people who are at best bored, at worst cynical and rent-seeking.
  • This situation keeps creative people apart from development policies.

    Our solution was to build an between them. We thought we could find a common ground in creative projects, and precisely in writing down project documents. Creative people see the usefulness of a solid document they can use to communicate with the rest of the world (for example when they try to raise funds); and, in the document is solid enough, it can easily be translated into the language of development policies. This way creative ideas could translate into regional development projects, to everybody’s satisfaction.

    Kublai, our interface, deploys an activity of support in writing a project document that we call COACHING. Naturally, when creatives actually sit down and put their ideas in an organized written form, it turns out that those ideas can actually be improved. So, coaching is not simply a form of translation: it is co-design, and can take unexpected turns.

    On the other side of the diagram, Kublai acts towards development policies endorsing the best and most relevant projects, and lending to them a form of institutional credibility.
  • This situation keeps creative people apart from development policies.

    Our solution was to build an between them. We thought we could find a common ground in creative projects, and precisely in writing down project documents. Creative people see the usefulness of a solid document they can use to communicate with the rest of the world (for example when they try to raise funds); and, in the document is solid enough, it can easily be translated into the language of development policies. This way creative ideas could translate into regional development projects, to everybody’s satisfaction.

    Kublai, our interface, deploys an activity of support in writing a project document that we call COACHING. Naturally, when creatives actually sit down and put their ideas in an organized written form, it turns out that those ideas can actually be improved. So, coaching is not simply a form of translation: it is co-design, and can take unexpected turns.

    On the other side of the diagram, Kublai acts towards development policies endorsing the best and most relevant projects, and lending to them a form of institutional credibility.
  • This situation keeps creative people apart from development policies.

    Our solution was to build an between them. We thought we could find a common ground in creative projects, and precisely in writing down project documents. Creative people see the usefulness of a solid document they can use to communicate with the rest of the world (for example when they try to raise funds); and, in the document is solid enough, it can easily be translated into the language of development policies. This way creative ideas could translate into regional development projects, to everybody’s satisfaction.

    Kublai, our interface, deploys an activity of support in writing a project document that we call COACHING. Naturally, when creatives actually sit down and put their ideas in an organized written form, it turns out that those ideas can actually be improved. So, coaching is not simply a form of translation: it is co-design, and can take unexpected turns.

    On the other side of the diagram, Kublai acts towards development policies endorsing the best and most relevant projects, and lending to them a form of institutional credibility.
  • This situation keeps creative people apart from development policies.

    Our solution was to build an between them. We thought we could find a common ground in creative projects, and precisely in writing down project documents. Creative people see the usefulness of a solid document they can use to communicate with the rest of the world (for example when they try to raise funds); and, in the document is solid enough, it can easily be translated into the language of development policies. This way creative ideas could translate into regional development projects, to everybody’s satisfaction.

    Kublai, our interface, deploys an activity of support in writing a project document that we call COACHING. Naturally, when creatives actually sit down and put their ideas in an organized written form, it turns out that those ideas can actually be improved. So, coaching is not simply a form of translation: it is co-design, and can take unexpected turns.

    On the other side of the diagram, Kublai acts towards development policies endorsing the best and most relevant projects, and lending to them a form of institutional credibility.
  • This situation keeps creative people apart from development policies.

    Our solution was to build an between them. We thought we could find a common ground in creative projects, and precisely in writing down project documents. Creative people see the usefulness of a solid document they can use to communicate with the rest of the world (for example when they try to raise funds); and, in the document is solid enough, it can easily be translated into the language of development policies. This way creative ideas could translate into regional development projects, to everybody’s satisfaction.

    Kublai, our interface, deploys an activity of support in writing a project document that we call COACHING. Naturally, when creatives actually sit down and put their ideas in an organized written form, it turns out that those ideas can actually be improved. So, coaching is not simply a form of translation: it is co-design, and can take unexpected turns.

    On the other side of the diagram, Kublai acts towards development policies endorsing the best and most relevant projects, and lending to them a form of institutional credibility.
  • This situation keeps creative people apart from development policies.

    Our solution was to build an between them. We thought we could find a common ground in creative projects, and precisely in writing down project documents. Creative people see the usefulness of a solid document they can use to communicate with the rest of the world (for example when they try to raise funds); and, in the document is solid enough, it can easily be translated into the language of development policies. This way creative ideas could translate into regional development projects, to everybody’s satisfaction.

    Kublai, our interface, deploys an activity of support in writing a project document that we call COACHING. Naturally, when creatives actually sit down and put their ideas in an organized written form, it turns out that those ideas can actually be improved. So, coaching is not simply a form of translation: it is co-design, and can take unexpected turns.

    On the other side of the diagram, Kublai acts towards development policies endorsing the best and most relevant projects, and lending to them a form of institutional credibility.
  • This situation keeps creative people apart from development policies.

    Our solution was to build an between them. We thought we could find a common ground in creative projects, and precisely in writing down project documents. Creative people see the usefulness of a solid document they can use to communicate with the rest of the world (for example when they try to raise funds); and, in the document is solid enough, it can easily be translated into the language of development policies. This way creative ideas could translate into regional development projects, to everybody’s satisfaction.

    Kublai, our interface, deploys an activity of support in writing a project document that we call COACHING. Naturally, when creatives actually sit down and put their ideas in an organized written form, it turns out that those ideas can actually be improved. So, coaching is not simply a form of translation: it is co-design, and can take unexpected turns.

    On the other side of the diagram, Kublai acts towards development policies endorsing the best and most relevant projects, and lending to them a form of institutional credibility.
  • This situation keeps creative people apart from development policies.

    Our solution was to build an between them. We thought we could find a common ground in creative projects, and precisely in writing down project documents. Creative people see the usefulness of a solid document they can use to communicate with the rest of the world (for example when they try to raise funds); and, in the document is solid enough, it can easily be translated into the language of development policies. This way creative ideas could translate into regional development projects, to everybody’s satisfaction.

    Kublai, our interface, deploys an activity of support in writing a project document that we call COACHING. Naturally, when creatives actually sit down and put their ideas in an organized written form, it turns out that those ideas can actually be improved. So, coaching is not simply a form of translation: it is co-design, and can take unexpected turns.

    On the other side of the diagram, Kublai acts towards development policies endorsing the best and most relevant projects, and lending to them a form of institutional credibility.
  • This situation keeps creative people apart from development policies.

    Our solution was to build an between them. We thought we could find a common ground in creative projects, and precisely in writing down project documents. Creative people see the usefulness of a solid document they can use to communicate with the rest of the world (for example when they try to raise funds); and, in the document is solid enough, it can easily be translated into the language of development policies. This way creative ideas could translate into regional development projects, to everybody’s satisfaction.

    Kublai, our interface, deploys an activity of support in writing a project document that we call COACHING. Naturally, when creatives actually sit down and put their ideas in an organized written form, it turns out that those ideas can actually be improved. So, coaching is not simply a form of translation: it is co-design, and can take unexpected turns.

    On the other side of the diagram, Kublai acts towards development policies endorsing the best and most relevant projects, and lending to them a form of institutional credibility.
  • This situation keeps creative people apart from development policies.

    Our solution was to build an between them. We thought we could find a common ground in creative projects, and precisely in writing down project documents. Creative people see the usefulness of a solid document they can use to communicate with the rest of the world (for example when they try to raise funds); and, in the document is solid enough, it can easily be translated into the language of development policies. This way creative ideas could translate into regional development projects, to everybody’s satisfaction.

    Kublai, our interface, deploys an activity of support in writing a project document that we call COACHING. Naturally, when creatives actually sit down and put their ideas in an organized written form, it turns out that those ideas can actually be improved. So, coaching is not simply a form of translation: it is co-design, and can take unexpected turns.

    On the other side of the diagram, Kublai acts towards development policies endorsing the best and most relevant projects, and lending to them a form of institutional credibility.
  • This situation keeps creative people apart from development policies.

    Our solution was to build an between them. We thought we could find a common ground in creative projects, and precisely in writing down project documents. Creative people see the usefulness of a solid document they can use to communicate with the rest of the world (for example when they try to raise funds); and, in the document is solid enough, it can easily be translated into the language of development policies. This way creative ideas could translate into regional development projects, to everybody’s satisfaction.

    Kublai, our interface, deploys an activity of support in writing a project document that we call COACHING. Naturally, when creatives actually sit down and put their ideas in an organized written form, it turns out that those ideas can actually be improved. So, coaching is not simply a form of translation: it is co-design, and can take unexpected turns.

    On the other side of the diagram, Kublai acts towards development policies endorsing the best and most relevant projects, and lending to them a form of institutional credibility.
  • A very important part of our interface is that no money is involved. By stating this very clearly we turn away opportunistic individuals, and strengthen our ties with people who are really interested in discussing and improving their ideas.
  • A very important part of our interface is that no money is involved. By stating this very clearly we turn away opportunistic individuals, and strengthen our ties with people who are really interested in discussing and improving their ideas.
  • A very important part of our interface is that no money is involved. By stating this very clearly we turn away opportunistic individuals, and strengthen our ties with people who are really interested in discussing and improving their ideas.
  • A very important part of our interface is that no money is involved. By stating this very clearly we turn away opportunistic individuals, and strengthen our ties with people who are really interested in discussing and improving their ideas.
  • A very important part of our interface is that no money is involved. By stating this very clearly we turn away opportunistic individuals, and strengthen our ties with people who are really interested in discussing and improving their ideas.
  • This interface takes the form of a multichannel collaborative environment for creative projects. It consists of a blog, a social network, an island on Second Life and physical encounters.
  • This interface takes the form of a multichannel collaborative environment for creative projects. It consists of a blog, a social network, an island on Second Life and physical encounters.
  • This interface takes the form of a multichannel collaborative environment for creative projects. It consists of a blog, a social network, an island on Second Life and physical encounters.
  • This interface takes the form of a multichannel collaborative environment for creative projects. It consists of a blog, a social network, an island on Second Life and physical encounters.
  • This interface takes the form of a multichannel collaborative environment for creative projects. It consists of a blog, a social network, an island on Second Life and physical encounters.
  • This interface takes the form of a multichannel collaborative environment for creative projects. It consists of a blog, a social network, an island on Second Life and physical encounters.
  • This interface takes the form of a multichannel collaborative environment for creative projects. It consists of a blog, a social network, an island on Second Life and physical encounters.
  • This interface takes the form of a multichannel collaborative environment for creative projects. It consists of a blog, a social network, an island on Second Life and physical encounters.
  • This interface takes the form of a multichannel collaborative environment for creative projects. It consists of a blog, a social network, an island on Second Life and physical encounters.
  • This interface takes the form of a multichannel collaborative environment for creative projects. It consists of a blog, a social network, an island on Second Life and physical encounters.
  • This interface takes the form of a multichannel collaborative environment for creative projects. It consists of a blog, a social network, an island on Second Life and physical encounters.
  • This interface takes the form of a multichannel collaborative environment for creative projects. It consists of a blog, a social network, an island on Second Life and physical encounters.
  • This interface takes the form of a multichannel collaborative environment for creative projects. It consists of a blog, a social network, an island on Second Life and physical encounters.
  • The blog’s main function is to tell the story of Kublai, and those of the most interesting creative projects developing within Kublai. The nice thing about blogs is they are very well integrated with Google and with other blogs. Our blog makes it relatively easy for people to get in touch with the Kublai meme, and to engage in spreading it virally. We have had about 20K visits in the first 9 months.
  • Some of the people who stumble on Kublai decide to get involved. They then proceed to join our social network.
  • As every social network, ours has a section dedicated to user profiles. Every user gets a personal info section, a wall for comments, can become friends with other users etc.

    Differently from most social networks, Kublai’s users can create projects. Each project has its own home page, and its own wall for comments; more importantly, each one gets a forum, which is where the action is. Project initiators ask questions or upload project documents, and get coached by the ensuing discussion. Users can - and do - also join other people’s projects if they are interested in taking part in those discussions.
  • As every social network, ours has a section dedicated to user profiles. Every user gets a personal info section, a wall for comments, can become friends with other users etc.

    Differently from most social networks, Kublai’s users can create projects. Each project has its own home page, and its own wall for comments; more importantly, each one gets a forum, which is where the action is. Project initiators ask questions or upload project documents, and get coached by the ensuing discussion. Users can - and do - also join other people’s projects if they are interested in taking part in those discussions.
  • The discussion on the SN is great: asynchronous, very tidy, taggable ad traceable. Sometimes, however, it is just not enough, and proponents feel the need for brainstorming sessions, or dense meetings. We then resort to synchronous channels, the most important of which is Second Life. We have created our own SL island, The Port of Creatives, peppered with cranes, containers, piers and the like). We use it for help desk sessions on individual projects, for conferences on topics of general interests to the community, but also for social events like parties, concerts of art exhibitions. This solution allows people from all over the country to meet at practically no cost and minimal organizational friction. Also, we find Second Life to give a sense of presence that is very useful to reinforce community social ties.
  • The discussion on the SN is great: asynchronous, very tidy, taggable ad traceable. Sometimes, however, it is just not enough, and proponents feel the need for brainstorming sessions, or dense meetings. We then resort to synchronous channels, the most important of which is Second Life. We have created our own SL island, The Port of Creatives, peppered with cranes, containers, piers and the like). We use it for help desk sessions on individual projects, for conferences on topics of general interests to the community, but also for social events like parties, concerts of art exhibitions. This solution allows people from all over the country to meet at practically no cost and minimal organizational friction. Also, we find Second Life to give a sense of presence that is very useful to reinforce community social ties.
  • The discussion on the SN is great: asynchronous, very tidy, taggable ad traceable. Sometimes, however, it is just not enough, and proponents feel the need for brainstorming sessions, or dense meetings. We then resort to synchronous channels, the most important of which is Second Life. We have created our own SL island, The Port of Creatives, peppered with cranes, containers, piers and the like). We use it for help desk sessions on individual projects, for conferences on topics of general interests to the community, but also for social events like parties, concerts of art exhibitions. This solution allows people from all over the country to meet at practically no cost and minimal organizational friction. Also, we find Second Life to give a sense of presence that is very useful to reinforce community social ties.
  • We also try to get around (like at creative industry meetings and exhibitions) and meet creative people physically. These pictures were taken at the first real life meetup of our community, Kublai Camp of 24th January 2009.
  • We also try to get around (like at creative industry meetings and exhibitions) and meet creative people physically. These pictures were taken at the first real life meetup of our community, Kublai Camp of 24th January 2009.
  • We also try to get around (like at creative industry meetings and exhibitions) and meet creative people physically. These pictures were taken at the first real life meetup of our community, Kublai Camp of 24th January 2009.
  • We also try to get around (like at creative industry meetings and exhibitions) and meet creative people physically. These pictures were taken at the first real life meetup of our community, Kublai Camp of 24th January 2009.
  • If that’s the system’s architecture, its source of energy are its values. Kublai is in general a pretty open-ended platform, and we encourage using it creatively for uses we had not originally envisaged, but we have a no surrender attitude on values. Our values are
    - openness: Kublai is open to everyone and projects are encouraged to be open too
    - informational transparency: all discussions are public
    - sharing: project documents are dowloadable, and everythingis published in CC. To make the most of Kublai, you must not be afraid that someone is going to steal your idea. By the way, this has not been an issue so far.
    - this system does not produce equality, but meritocracy. Since everything is out in the open, it is very clear which projects are most interesting, and which people make the most useful contributions. To give you an idea, the most popular projects have 60-80 subscribers, while the least popular ones have only 4 or 5.
  • If that’s the system’s architecture, its source of energy are its values. Kublai is in general a pretty open-ended platform, and we encourage using it creatively for uses we had not originally envisaged, but we have a no surrender attitude on values. Our values are
    - openness: Kublai is open to everyone and projects are encouraged to be open too
    - informational transparency: all discussions are public
    - sharing: project documents are dowloadable, and everythingis published in CC. To make the most of Kublai, you must not be afraid that someone is going to steal your idea. By the way, this has not been an issue so far.
    - this system does not produce equality, but meritocracy. Since everything is out in the open, it is very clear which projects are most interesting, and which people make the most useful contributions. To give you an idea, the most popular projects have 60-80 subscribers, while the least popular ones have only 4 or 5.
  • If that’s the system’s architecture, its source of energy are its values. Kublai is in general a pretty open-ended platform, and we encourage using it creatively for uses we had not originally envisaged, but we have a no surrender attitude on values. Our values are
    - openness: Kublai is open to everyone and projects are encouraged to be open too
    - informational transparency: all discussions are public
    - sharing: project documents are dowloadable, and everythingis published in CC. To make the most of Kublai, you must not be afraid that someone is going to steal your idea. By the way, this has not been an issue so far.
    - this system does not produce equality, but meritocracy. Since everything is out in the open, it is very clear which projects are most interesting, and which people make the most useful contributions. To give you an idea, the most popular projects have 60-80 subscribers, while the least popular ones have only 4 or 5.
  • If that’s the system’s architecture, its source of energy are its values. Kublai is in general a pretty open-ended platform, and we encourage using it creatively for uses we had not originally envisaged, but we have a no surrender attitude on values. Our values are
    - openness: Kublai is open to everyone and projects are encouraged to be open too
    - informational transparency: all discussions are public
    - sharing: project documents are dowloadable, and everythingis published in CC. To make the most of Kublai, you must not be afraid that someone is going to steal your idea. By the way, this has not been an issue so far.
    - this system does not produce equality, but meritocracy. Since everything is out in the open, it is very clear which projects are most interesting, and which people make the most useful contributions. To give you an idea, the most popular projects have 60-80 subscribers, while the least popular ones have only 4 or 5.
  • If that’s the system’s architecture, its source of energy are its values. Kublai is in general a pretty open-ended platform, and we encourage using it creatively for uses we had not originally envisaged, but we have a no surrender attitude on values. Our values are
    - openness: Kublai is open to everyone and projects are encouraged to be open too
    - informational transparency: all discussions are public
    - sharing: project documents are dowloadable, and everythingis published in CC. To make the most of Kublai, you must not be afraid that someone is going to steal your idea. By the way, this has not been an issue so far.
    - this system does not produce equality, but meritocracy. Since everything is out in the open, it is very clear which projects are most interesting, and which people make the most useful contributions. To give you an idea, the most popular projects have 60-80 subscribers, while the least popular ones have only 4 or 5.
  • As a consequence of this setup, Kublaians have begun to develop a tendency to peer-to-peer project design, which we of course try to encourage. So, coaching is made partly by paid experts in the workgroup, which we regard as some sort of baseline; but other contributions, every bit as valuable, are offered for free by Kublaians with the relevant competences. Some of them are in their turn project proponents, who benefited from coaching earlier on and wish to give something back to the community; others are simply interested in taking part in the discussion. The result is that we can offer a pretty high level of coaching at a very reasonable cost.
  • After 9 months of work, we have the feeling we have built a community. The discussions on the various fora are fruitful and constructive, with no flames or tense situations. Kublaians have even started doing something we had not designed for, that is using Kublai not only to help each other write down projects documents, but to join forces towards project deployment. This is a group we really like: a small IT entrepreneur from Sicily, an advertising freelance professional from Milano and a high-profile architect from Bologna. They met in Second Life. Their project is recuperating a 1929 Art Déco café in a small town in Sicily, and deploying it as a kind of hi-tech literary café.
  • An important lesson we have learned from deploying Kublai is that Kublai is not enough. Here is the reason: if you say to people “bring on your ideas” they will come up with the ideas they are interested in, not with the ones you are interested in. So, some of Kublai’s projects do look like regional development material, albeit more creative, like the hi-tech art café I told you about; but others don’t, at all. Some look like tech startups. Some like full-on art projects. Some are very hard to attach to any particular territory, for example they happen in Second Life.
    We don’t want to filter them: we think that no good idea should be wasted. So, deployment channels must go well beyond the traditional call for projects of development policy, and extend to VC, partnerships with local administrations, local banks etc. And of course, there is room for more interfaces, with different focus.
    In other words, we have a vision of Kublai as a part of a diverse ecosystem of creativity and innovation. We have already started talks with different stakeholders, and we are more than willing to talk to anyone interested in building such an ecosystem. That’s a invitation.
  • An important lesson we have learned from deploying Kublai is that Kublai is not enough. Here is the reason: if you say to people “bring on your ideas” they will come up with the ideas they are interested in, not with the ones you are interested in. So, some of Kublai’s projects do look like regional development material, albeit more creative, like the hi-tech art café I told you about; but others don’t, at all. Some look like tech startups. Some like full-on art projects. Some are very hard to attach to any particular territory, for example they happen in Second Life.
    We don’t want to filter them: we think that no good idea should be wasted. So, deployment channels must go well beyond the traditional call for projects of development policy, and extend to VC, partnerships with local administrations, local banks etc. And of course, there is room for more interfaces, with different focus.
    In other words, we have a vision of Kublai as a part of a diverse ecosystem of creativity and innovation. We have already started talks with different stakeholders, and we are more than willing to talk to anyone interested in building such an ecosystem. That’s a invitation.
  • An important lesson we have learned from deploying Kublai is that Kublai is not enough. Here is the reason: if you say to people “bring on your ideas” they will come up with the ideas they are interested in, not with the ones you are interested in. So, some of Kublai’s projects do look like regional development material, albeit more creative, like the hi-tech art café I told you about; but others don’t, at all. Some look like tech startups. Some like full-on art projects. Some are very hard to attach to any particular territory, for example they happen in Second Life.
    We don’t want to filter them: we think that no good idea should be wasted. So, deployment channels must go well beyond the traditional call for projects of development policy, and extend to VC, partnerships with local administrations, local banks etc. And of course, there is room for more interfaces, with different focus.
    In other words, we have a vision of Kublai as a part of a diverse ecosystem of creativity and innovation. We have already started talks with different stakeholders, and we are more than willing to talk to anyone interested in building such an ecosystem. That’s a invitation.
  • An important lesson we have learned from deploying Kublai is that Kublai is not enough. Here is the reason: if you say to people “bring on your ideas” they will come up with the ideas they are interested in, not with the ones you are interested in. So, some of Kublai’s projects do look like regional development material, albeit more creative, like the hi-tech art café I told you about; but others don’t, at all. Some look like tech startups. Some like full-on art projects. Some are very hard to attach to any particular territory, for example they happen in Second Life.
    We don’t want to filter them: we think that no good idea should be wasted. So, deployment channels must go well beyond the traditional call for projects of development policy, and extend to VC, partnerships with local administrations, local banks etc. And of course, there is room for more interfaces, with different focus.
    In other words, we have a vision of Kublai as a part of a diverse ecosystem of creativity and innovation. We have already started talks with different stakeholders, and we are more than willing to talk to anyone interested in building such an ecosystem. That’s a invitation.
  • An important lesson we have learned from deploying Kublai is that Kublai is not enough. Here is the reason: if you say to people “bring on your ideas” they will come up with the ideas they are interested in, not with the ones you are interested in. So, some of Kublai’s projects do look like regional development material, albeit more creative, like the hi-tech art café I told you about; but others don’t, at all. Some look like tech startups. Some like full-on art projects. Some are very hard to attach to any particular territory, for example they happen in Second Life.
    We don’t want to filter them: we think that no good idea should be wasted. So, deployment channels must go well beyond the traditional call for projects of development policy, and extend to VC, partnerships with local administrations, local banks etc. And of course, there is room for more interfaces, with different focus.
    In other words, we have a vision of Kublai as a part of a diverse ecosystem of creativity and innovation. We have already started talks with different stakeholders, and we are more than willing to talk to anyone interested in building such an ecosystem. That’s a invitation.
  • An important lesson we have learned from deploying Kublai is that Kublai is not enough. Here is the reason: if you say to people “bring on your ideas” they will come up with the ideas they are interested in, not with the ones you are interested in. So, some of Kublai’s projects do look like regional development material, albeit more creative, like the hi-tech art café I told you about; but others don’t, at all. Some look like tech startups. Some like full-on art projects. Some are very hard to attach to any particular territory, for example they happen in Second Life.
    We don’t want to filter them: we think that no good idea should be wasted. So, deployment channels must go well beyond the traditional call for projects of development policy, and extend to VC, partnerships with local administrations, local banks etc. And of course, there is room for more interfaces, with different focus.
    In other words, we have a vision of Kublai as a part of a diverse ecosystem of creativity and innovation. We have already started talks with different stakeholders, and we are more than willing to talk to anyone interested in building such an ecosystem. That’s a invitation.
  • An important lesson we have learned from deploying Kublai is that Kublai is not enough. Here is the reason: if you say to people “bring on your ideas” they will come up with the ideas they are interested in, not with the ones you are interested in. So, some of Kublai’s projects do look like regional development material, albeit more creative, like the hi-tech art café I told you about; but others don’t, at all. Some look like tech startups. Some like full-on art projects. Some are very hard to attach to any particular territory, for example they happen in Second Life.
    We don’t want to filter them: we think that no good idea should be wasted. So, deployment channels must go well beyond the traditional call for projects of development policy, and extend to VC, partnerships with local administrations, local banks etc. And of course, there is room for more interfaces, with different focus.
    In other words, we have a vision of Kublai as a part of a diverse ecosystem of creativity and innovation. We have already started talks with different stakeholders, and we are more than willing to talk to anyone interested in building such an ecosystem. That’s a invitation.
  • An important lesson we have learned from deploying Kublai is that Kublai is not enough. Here is the reason: if you say to people “bring on your ideas” they will come up with the ideas they are interested in, not with the ones you are interested in. So, some of Kublai’s projects do look like regional development material, albeit more creative, like the hi-tech art café I told you about; but others don’t, at all. Some look like tech startups. Some like full-on art projects. Some are very hard to attach to any particular territory, for example they happen in Second Life.
    We don’t want to filter them: we think that no good idea should be wasted. So, deployment channels must go well beyond the traditional call for projects of development policy, and extend to VC, partnerships with local administrations, local banks etc. And of course, there is room for more interfaces, with different focus.
    In other words, we have a vision of Kublai as a part of a diverse ecosystem of creativity and innovation. We have already started talks with different stakeholders, and we are more than willing to talk to anyone interested in building such an ecosystem. That’s a invitation.
  • An important lesson we have learned from deploying Kublai is that Kublai is not enough. Here is the reason: if you say to people “bring on your ideas” they will come up with the ideas they are interested in, not with the ones you are interested in. So, some of Kublai’s projects do look like regional development material, albeit more creative, like the hi-tech art café I told you about; but others don’t, at all. Some look like tech startups. Some like full-on art projects. Some are very hard to attach to any particular territory, for example they happen in Second Life.
    We don’t want to filter them: we think that no good idea should be wasted. So, deployment channels must go well beyond the traditional call for projects of development policy, and extend to VC, partnerships with local administrations, local banks etc. And of course, there is room for more interfaces, with different focus.
    In other words, we have a vision of Kublai as a part of a diverse ecosystem of creativity and innovation. We have already started talks with different stakeholders, and we are more than willing to talk to anyone interested in building such an ecosystem. That’s a invitation.
  • Any way forward goes through gaining understanding, at a much deeper level, how you do policy in a network. We are not brandishing macro aggregates like public expenditure; we are not tweaking micro incentives with taxes and subsidies. We work with weird stuff like values, endorsement, soft power; even the distinction between paid members of the workgroup and unpaid members of the community tends to blur. And the network does seem to surprise us with all kinds of emergent behaviour which we did not design for; it cannot very well be understood by looking at the level of the individual agent.
  • Any way forward goes through gaining understanding, at a much deeper level, how you do policy in a network. We are not brandishing macro aggregates like public expenditure; we are not tweaking micro incentives with taxes and subsidies. We work with weird stuff like values, endorsement, soft power; even the distinction between paid members of the workgroup and unpaid members of the community tends to blur. And the network does seem to surprise us with all kinds of emergent behaviour which we did not design for; it cannot very well be understood by looking at the level of the individual agent.
  • Any way forward goes through gaining understanding, at a much deeper level, how you do policy in a network. We are not brandishing macro aggregates like public expenditure; we are not tweaking micro incentives with taxes and subsidies. We work with weird stuff like values, endorsement, soft power; even the distinction between paid members of the workgroup and unpaid members of the community tends to blur. And the network does seem to surprise us with all kinds of emergent behaviour which we did not design for; it cannot very well be understood by looking at the level of the individual agent.
  • Any way forward goes through gaining understanding, at a much deeper level, how you do policy in a network. We are not brandishing macro aggregates like public expenditure; we are not tweaking micro incentives with taxes and subsidies. We work with weird stuff like values, endorsement, soft power; even the distinction between paid members of the workgroup and unpaid members of the community tends to blur. And the network does seem to surprise us with all kinds of emergent behaviour which we did not design for; it cannot very well be understood by looking at the level of the individual agent.
  • Any way forward goes through gaining understanding, at a much deeper level, how you do policy in a network. We are not brandishing macro aggregates like public expenditure; we are not tweaking micro incentives with taxes and subsidies. We work with weird stuff like values, endorsement, soft power; even the distinction between paid members of the workgroup and unpaid members of the community tends to blur. And the network does seem to surprise us with all kinds of emergent behaviour which we did not design for; it cannot very well be understood by looking at the level of the individual agent.
  • Any way forward goes through gaining understanding, at a much deeper level, how you do policy in a network. We are not brandishing macro aggregates like public expenditure; we are not tweaking micro incentives with taxes and subsidies. We work with weird stuff like values, endorsement, soft power; even the distinction between paid members of the workgroup and unpaid members of the community tends to blur. And the network does seem to surprise us with all kinds of emergent behaviour which we did not design for; it cannot very well be understood by looking at the level of the individual agent.
  • Both ways forward - building an ecosystem of creativity and innovation and understanding how innovative thinking is supported in social networks - go way beyond Kublai. As we begin to explore them, we could use all the help we can get, so anybody who wants to get involved feel free to contact me or my colleague Tito Bianchi.
  • We have not advertised Kublai, and we try not to get too involved with media either. The internet buzz generated around the project, mainly through the blog and Second Life, propitiated a rate of growth which we think is about right: two new registered users a day. About one Kublaian in 8 proposes a project.
  • Transcript

    • 1. An initiative of the Italian Ministry of Alberto Cottica Economic Development - Department of Development Policies lunedì 16 marzo 2009
    • 2. Uneven development lunedì 16 marzo 2009
    • 3. Get creative people involved but how? lunedì 16 marzo 2009
    • 4. Wrong signals attract the wrong kind of people lunedì 16 marzo 2009
    • 5. People Projects Policies Coaching Endorsement Kublai (Calls) Build an interface lunedì 16 marzo 2009
    • 6. CC dolphinsdock on Flickr = Scare off the opportunists lunedì 16 marzo 2009
    • 7. social blog network second physical life meetups A multichannel collaborative design environment lunedì 16 marzo 2009
    • 8. A blog to tell the tale lunedì 16 marzo 2009
    • 9. A social network to work on creative projects lunedì 16 marzo 2009
    • 10. lunedì 16 marzo 2009
    • 11. Second Life for meetings and social events lunedì 16 marzo 2009
    • 12. ...without forgetting to meet in person as well! lunedì 16 marzo 2009
    • 13. •openness •transparency No surrender on values •sharing •merit lunedì 16 marzo 2009
    • 14. Encourage peering lunedì 16 marzo 2009
    • 15. From designing together to making together lunedì 16 marzo 2009
    • 16. People Projects Interfaces Policies VC Calls Local Kublai PAs Private donors Local banks Coaching Endorsement The future? lunedì 16 marzo 2009
    • 17. Understanding the mesolevel Eigenvalue centrality: 0.21800459298830732 Mr Volare aka Alberto Cottica 0.20979145153073434 Walter Giacovelli aka walter Revolution 0.18225075776295213 Cristian Mazzoni 0.18082851681987844 Marco Magrassi 0.17903221947630057 AdriRips aka Ginevra 0.1691319931662334 Augusto aka Phishman 0.168461460631231 caterina cristina fiorentino 0.16455741906259003 Giordano 0.16168716477411457 Marco Colarossi aka Emiliano Carver 0.15858338868901645 stefano consiglio 0.15413827679464628 Tito 0.15316541452350232 Nunzio Gesualdi 0.1502214999749514 Massimiliano Selvaggi 0.14568976556424396 Stefania Trotta 0.1456897655642439 mirco 0.1401562835511431 Antonella Napolitano 0.13075605490674205 Ilaria Vitellio 0.1212363998409828 Antonio Andreoli 0.11811703731768042 Alessandro 0.11427051616668299 Noemi Borges 0.11427051616668298 Carmen lunedì 16 marzo 2009
    • 18. This is just the Released under Creative Commons 2.5 attribution - noncommercial - share alike Thanks to Elena Trombetta for Kublai Camp beginning... pics lunedì 16 marzo 2009
    • 19. 600 80 450 60 300 40 150 20 0 0 maggio luglio settembre novembre gennaio luglio agosto settembre ottobre novembre dicembre gennaio febbraio Nuovi utenti Total users New projects Total projects An “organic” growth lunedì 16 marzo 2009

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