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23 data-structures

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23 data-structures 23 data-structures Presentation Transcript

  • Stat405 Data structures Hadley Wickham Thursday, 11 November 2010
  • Assessment • Final: there is no final • Two groups still haven’t sent me electronic versions of their project • Many of you STILL HAVEN’T returned your team evaluations Thursday, 11 November 2010
  • 1. Basic data types 2. Vectors, matrices & arrays 3. Lists & data.frames Thursday, 11 November 2010
  • 1d Vector List 2d Matrix Data frame nd Array Same types Different types Thursday, 11 November 2010
  • When vectors of character as.character(c(T, F)) different types occur as.character(seq_len(5)) in an expression, as.logical(c(0, 1, 100)) they will be numeric automatically as.logical(c("T", "F", "a")) as.numeric(c("A", "100")) coerced to the same logical as.numeric(c(T, F)) type: character > numeric > logical mode() names() Optional, but useful length() A scalar is a vector of length 1 Technically, these are all atomic vectors Thursday, 11 November 2010
  • Your turn Experiment with automatic coercion. What is happening in the following cases? 104 & 2 < 4 mean(diamonds$cut == "Good") c(T, F, T, T, "F") c(1, 2, 3, 4, F) Thursday, 11 November 2010
  • Matrix (2d) (1, 12) Array (>2d) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Just like a vector. (4, 3) (2, 6) Has mode() and 1 5 9 1 3 5 7 9 11 length(). 2 6 10 2 4 6 8 10 12 Create with matrix 3 7 11 () or array(), or a <- seq_len(12) 4 8 12 from a vector by dim(a) <- c(1, 12) setting dim() dim(a) <- c(4, 3) dim(a) <- c(2, 6) as.vector() dim(a) <- c(3, 2, 2) converts back to a vector Thursday, 11 November 2010
  • List Is also a vector (so has c(1, 2, c(3, 4)) mode, length and names), list(1, 2, list(3, 4)) but is different in that it can store any other vector inside c("a", T, 1:3) it (including lists). list("a", T, 1:3) Use unlist() to convert to a <- list(1:3, 1:5) a vector. Use as.list() to unlist(a) convert a vector to a list. as.list(a) b <- list(1:3, "a", "b") unlist(b) Technically a recursive vector Thursday, 11 November 2010
  • Data frame List of vectors, each of the same length. (Cross between list and matrix) Different to matrix in that each column can have a different type Thursday, 11 November 2010
  • # How do you convert a matrix to a data frame? # How do you convert a data frame to a matrix? # What is different? # What does these subsetting operations do? # Why do they work? (Remember to use str) diamonds[1] diamonds[[1]] diamonds[["cut"]] Thursday, 11 November 2010
  • x <- sample(12) # What's the difference between a & b? a <- matrix(x, 4, 3) b <- array(x, c(4, 3)) # What's the difference between x & y y <- matrix(x, 12) # How are these subsetting operations different? a[, 1] a[, 1, drop = FALSE] a[1, ] a[1, , drop = FALSE] Thursday, 11 November 2010
  • 1d names() length() c() colnames() ncol() cbind() 2d rownames() nrow() rbind() abind() nd dimnames() dim() (special package) Thursday, 11 November 2010
  • b <- seq_len(10) a <- letters[b] # What sort of matrix does this create? rbind(a, b) cbind(a, b) # Why would you want to use a data frame here? # How would you create it? Thursday, 11 November 2010
  • load(url("http://had.co.nz/stat405/data/quiz.rdata")) # What is a? What is b? # How are they different? How are they similar? # How can you turn a in to b? # How can you turn b in to a? # What are c, d, and e? # How are they different? How are they similar? # How can you turn one into another? # What is f? # How can you extract the first element? # How can you extract the first value in the first # element? Thursday, 11 November 2010
  • # a is numeric vector, containing the numbers 1 to 10 # b is a list of numeric scalars # they contain the same values, but in a different format identical(a[1], b[[1]]) identical(a, unlist(b)) identical(b, as.list(a)) # c is a named list # d is a data.frame # e is a numeric matrix # From most to least general: c, d, e identical(c, as.list(d)) identical(d, as.data.frame(c)) identical(e, data.matrix(d)) Thursday, 11 November 2010
  • # f is a list of matrices of different dimensions f[[1]] f[[1]][1, 2] Thursday, 11 November 2010
  • # What does these subsetting operations do? # Why do they work? (Remember to use str) diamonds[1] diamonds[[1]] diamonds[["cut"]] diamonds[["cut"]][1:10] diamonds$cut[1:10] Thursday, 11 November 2010
  • Vectors x[1:4] — Matrices x[1:4, ] x[1:4, , Arrays x[, 2:3, ] drop = F] x[[1]] Lists x$name x[1] Thursday, 11 November 2010
  • # What's the difference between a & b? a <- matrix(x, 4, 3) b <- array(x, c(4, 3)) # What's the difference between x & y y <- matrix(x, 12) # How are these subsetting operations different? a[, 1] a[, 1, drop = FALSE] a[1, ] a[1, , drop = FALSE] Thursday, 11 November 2010
  • 1d c() matrix() 2d t() data.frame() nd array() aperm() Thursday, 11 November 2010
  • b <- seq_len(10) a <- letters[b] # What sort of matrix does this create? rbind(a, b) cbind(a, b) # Why would you want to use a data frame here? # How would you create it? Thursday, 11 November 2010