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Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
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Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013
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Gulf South Conference 2013 - February 28, 2013

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Berea College, Entrepreneurship for the Public Good Program displays a five year pedagogical approach with a focus on service learning for Liberal Arts undergraduates. This 8 week summer institute …

Berea College, Entrepreneurship for the Public Good Program displays a five year pedagogical approach with a focus on service learning for Liberal Arts undergraduates. This 8 week summer institute combines two courses or competency-based, credit bearing educational experience in which students: (a) participate in mutually identified service activities that benefit the Appalachian community, and (b) reflect on the service activity in such a way as to gain further understanding of Appalachian Studies, a broader appreciation of the entrepreneurial leadership discipline, and an enhanced sense of personal values and civic responsibility. This case study integrates the growing popularity of adventure tourism, ecotourism and heritage tourism and contains the potential for building an alternative economy, one that promises greater monetary returns for local residents, the preservation of rural traditions, and the protection of sensitive natural resources. Three traveler and tourist "personas" into Eastern Kentucky are demonstrated.

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  • Berea College’s mission of educating and inspiring students primarily from Appalachia to become service-oriented leaders has involved identifying students of high academic promise but limited financial resources for over 150 years. In pursuit of this mission, Berea College has used its $1.1 billion endowment to provide each student admitted to the college with full tuition scholarship for the four years they are enrolled and reside at the college.
  • The EPG Program defines “Entrepreneurial Leadership” as: "A process when one person or a group of people in a community originate an idea or innovation for a needed change and influence others in that community to commit to realizing that change, despite the presence of risk, ambiguity, or uncertainty". For faculty in the room, I have my appointment in the General Studies faculty, but formally was tenured in the business school at previous universities. I state this because of my research and teaching an entrepreneurial mindset to students across the curriculum and in the general studies program I impact freshmen and seniors as well as EPG Candidates and Fellows
  • The demand for social entrepreneurship education has grown substantially, resulting in increased course offerings in universities globally. Despite the growing interest in this domain, little is known about what pedagogies are required for success as a social entrepreneur. Our work here set forth a pedagogical framework deemed important by rural community economic development social entrepreneurship practitioners through a series of case studies taught in distressed rural communities. We investigate the extent to which social entrepreneurship coursework aligns with how practitioners prioritize competencies that lead to success in social entrepreneurship and discuss the implications for social entrepreneurship course development.
  • The EPG Program defines “Entrepreneurial Leadership” as: "A process when one person or a group of people in a community originate an idea or innovation for a needed change and influence others in that community to commit to realizing that change, despite the presence of risk, ambiguity, or uncertainty". For faculty in the room, I have my appointment in the General Studies faculty, but formally was tenured in the business school at previous universities. I state this because of my research and teaching an entrepreneurial mindset to students across the curriculum and in the general studies program I impact freshmen and seniors as well as EPG Candidates and Fellows
  • Appalachia is a vast American region covering all or parts of 13 states running from western New York to northeastern Mississippi. While Appalachian teenagers wear the same clothing styles and listened to the same music as their counterparts here in Athens GA and in the rest of the nation, they are impacted internationally by the local Wal-Marts carried an abundance of cheap, internationally made goods. Hidden within this new Appalachian 21 st century society, however, were old Appalachian problems persistent over the last 100 years - an inadequate tax base, a low-wage economy, environmental abuse, civic fraud, political corruption, absentee landownership, and corporate irresponsibility. These elements continued to weaken the region and to limit the lives of its residents. The physical destruction of the mountains, rising drug dependence, and the loss of traditional values and culture, moreover, threatened to destroy those things that had made the region distinct. Appalachia was rapidly joining the cultural and economic mainstream, and that prospect raised a new set of uncertainties.
  • What is a distressed county? The Appalachian Regional Commission uses a four-rung system to measure counties' needs. Distressed: "Distressed" means poverty and unemployment rates outpace the national average 1 and 1/2 times, and per capita income falls two-thirds below the national average.
  • This slide highlights the KRADD with a net loss in population a community most dependent on coal mining income. The KRADD loss 3% of its population from July 1, 2008 to the 2000 census, while Kentucky saw an increase of 5.6% and an 8% positive increase in the US populations. The KRADD 65.3% high school completion and 10.5% of the country residents have college degrees for higher. This fall short of state and national averages in educational attainment data. The State of Kentucky has 80.1 % high school completion and 20% college degrees with national educational attainment achieving 84.4 percent high school completions and 27.5 college degrees.The percent poverty data for the Kentucky River Area Development District reports that 31% of the country residents have incomes below the poverty levels. This is a much higher rate than state (17.3) and national averages (13%) in number of households below the poverty level. Kentucky tourism is $10.1 billion industry employing 176,840 people in 2007 . Tourism the focus of the service learning assignments looms large within the Appalachia’s postindustrial economy. Other states have found solutions to the rural economic development problem by commitment of adventure tourism 1 . Garrett County, Maryland as similarities with eastern Kentucky’s terrain, its location as a part of Appalachia, and its successful history of leveraging adventure tourism to create sustainable and substantial economic development in what was once the most impoverished county in the state. 2. The Ozarks in Arkansas served as an excellent comparative analysis to our work because the region features similar landscape qualities, recreational and tourism appeal, its demographic similarities to the study area, and also has successfully leveraged adventure tourism for notable rural economic development. 3 . The Berkshires region in western Massachusetts as a relevant comparison to eastern Kentucky because of it as a rural destination, and its great success in regional branding involving multiple counties. 4. Eight adventure tourism multi-county locations in West Virginia with particular attention to ATV’s and equestrians due to proximity to Kentucky and because of the overall quality of the landscape and rural small community economic development can serve as a multi-county, multi-state model. Could we replicate a model in the class we wondered? \\
  • At least 115 million Americans lived within a day’s driving distance of Appalachia, and the region’s water, forests, and cultural resources increasingly appealed to urban hikers, campers, kayakers, fishermen, and families seeking relaxation and cultural enrichment. In parts of the region less scarred by environmental destruction, outfitters, bed and breakfast accommodations, restaurants, and other small businesses multiplied to serve urban tourists seeking outdoor adventure. Festivals celebrating mountain music and crafts and fairs promoting local farm products, homecomings, historical reenactments, and community gatherings of all kinds brought dollars into local economies, supported local shop owners, and sustained a sense of local pride.
  • This chart indicates in the current setting as of the year 2000 for both educational attainment and wages. On the left axis we show each of Kentucky countries and plot the average annual earning of the current workforce. On the “X” access we plot for each county the % of adults with college degrees residing in the countries. As a means of comparison, we provide a context contrasting Kentucky with the national averages. It was this challenge and the aspirations to create home grown talent with an entrepreneurial mindset and skill set that were the driving forces to the service learning and civic engagement activity.
  • The team decided to go with a two step curriculum. First, they would in fact demonstrate the requirements for generating an idea, turning the idea into a concept and then, crafting the good idea or the concept into reasonable opportunity. Like their own idea generation process, the team felt that participant needed to gain a “taste” for the competitive nature of the idea review process by inserting judges. The team wanted to demonstrate the process and select the Rod Mate experiential exercise as simulated case study.
  • Note that the first round of ideas generation was peer ranking, with peer judges. This help to cement the realism and standards for the simulations.
  • From six to three teams of participants rated by the “real world” judges as to which everyday product offerings simulated them to consider to provide resources to move the concepts forward.
  • In the hamlet of Hyden, with a population of 300, and also the Leslie County, County Seat my EPG team and I launched a Habit for Humanity Restore providing materials to renovate and rebuild residential homes. While in Leslie County I discovered a problem that was affecting communities in Appalachia. People needed to save money and reduce their living costs due to the financial hardships of the recession and rising energy costs. This is not just a local problem but a global one. 80 % of the energy used in the US is produced by fossil fuels, either coal or fuel. Fossil fuels are depleting slowly leaving us no option but to develop alternatives to replace those energy sources. As a response governments around the world and the US are designing incentives and putting stimulus money into sustainable energy initiatives and increase the use of renewable energy resources. Energy efficiency is the first step towards getting into becoming more sustainable community. Energy efficiency doesn’t promises to solve the energy crisis but allows us to buy time and develop innovative ways to use renewable energy resources.   My second summer in the EPG Program I secured an internship at the Mountain Association of Community Economic Development in Berea. I was trained to recognize cost saving opportunities through energy auditing by my mentor. During this summer I executed energy audits with several different Appalachian communities among them: returning to Hyden in Leslie County, Hindman, Renfro Valley, and Mount Vernon. I provided comprehensive energy audits that would set forth actionable plans for the business owners and NGOs. In our exist briefings the CEOs decided on which set of options to follow. The plan might include a different combination of strategies such as managing energy more wisely, changing light bulbs, change equipment that was not energy efficient, insulation, sealing air holes, and etc. (like your health the better you take care of yourself the better conditions you will be) Both because of the MACED learning and the intern experience acquired in the energy field I was invited to work with Sustainable Berea, a not-for-profit community-based organization. Sustainable Berea has one strategy of among many, to address the needs of residential home energy users. I have a keen interest in that emerging new market segment - the residential home energy users. Methods My action plan is still being executed. I have here a One Page Business Plan that sets forth the 5 key components of the project. Applying Using and applying the six EPG abilities, applying the One Page Business Plan as a tool and with the funding by CELTS and partnership with Sustainable Berea Hoping I am hoping to roll out a business model that will test the new market responsiveness to new the residential home energy users.
  • The premise and case studies of “design thinking” were expressed in 2007. More recently you could see Tim Brown talk about these principles at the TED Conference online.
  • The premise and case studies of “design thinking” were expressed in 2007. More recently publication can be found by Tim Brown in the Stanford Social Innovation Review.
  • KYLE – As a result of the entire class experience we discovered in Berea that…. And in Knott County… we discovered talking to community partners A self-guided tour on the visitors’ cell phone is the delivery platform for the interpretative cultural content. Research suggests that it increases the visitor experience. Visitors learn of the tour from website, signage, brochures, advertising . Visitors disconnect and rejoin the tour at will. A visitors walk the venue they dial the tour phone number, enter stop numbers of points of interest and listen to the tour. Smart phones were “hot” in Knott County. We investigated smart phone app developers. Let’s see one demonstration. SHOW THE NEXT ROUND OF PROTOTYPES CITY SLICKERS VIDEO.
  • A Big of History: (a) The first year Lets begin by the evaluation of the foundations of the EPG 6 abilities. For the most part the journey was not steady nor calm. The EPG experience is like going through white water rapids * experiencing ups and downs, fast turns, unexpected falls and route full of challenges. Engaging Complexities and Uncertainties: This is my team going through the struggles to adapt and engage the ambiguity of the program. Exposure to risk but still having the helping hand of the professors. Metaphor: Throwing our selves to the water with safe jackets (real experience in Hyden). Example.- The examples of taking people out of the water- When times are too ruff partners are there to rescue you. The anecdote of the “ handicap accessible” Phelps Stokes. Veryfying a second time. There were several complex constrains on our team, no start-up capital, the lack of donations to sustain our Habitat for Humanity re-store, and little volunteer assistance from the community. *Use the public like friends, Lin.
  • Education/Training/Consulting (especially if you don't need real estate or if you can use a co-working space or low cost real estate for the classroom). This amounts to create quality IP & scale it & brand it. Examples are here: http://www.trainingindustry.com/ ... This is one which you can do at K-8, high school, college, and test prep. E-commerce/Drop shipping (I know this is done in green baby products). Import/export (particularly in BRIC countries with art or fashion) Sourcing Fair Trade Goods (example: Starbucks or your local coffee shop): http://www.fairtradefederation.org/ Creating a more sustainable waste stream (ie reduce, reuse, recycle). Terra Cycle is a beast in this category: http://www.terracycle.net/en-US/ Business process outsourcing (software, presentations, web design, etc..). You could look at Somasource http://samasource.org/ B2B services in translation. (ie translating documents). One example is http://www.htcorp.net/ . They train and hire the disabled to clean businesses (I'm not sure what else they might do). Membership & trade associations ( work in conjunction with training/education and perhaps even over the longer term events.) ASTD, SHRM, AMA, etc.. http://www.astd.org/ Provide soft skills training or professional services to non-profits or minority businesses. Be a media publisher in a high value space (health care, education, psychology, etc..). http://www.bkconnection.com/ is a fantastic example. 03/19/13 Ashoka U Exchange Arizona State University, Tempe Arizona February 10-11, 2012 Building Analytical Business Skills for Social Entrepreneurs
  • The Lee county Recreational center is very proactive with its online presence. The page has effectively used multiple Search Engine Optimization (SEO) techniques. These include: using many key words that Google and other search engines use to look for and display websites when people search for them, how many other sites link to the Lee County Rec. Center page and how many pages the Lee County Rec. Center links to on its page. The Rec. Center has been so successful with these techniques that they are the first site that shows up when a person searches for “Lee County Rec. Center” on Google. Mr. Owens has done a great job developing the Rec. Center’s Blog, Twitter account, Facebook account, and website, but there a few marketing tools that he can take easy advantage of to make his website even more effective. In studying the success of socialmediaexaminer.com (Michael Stelzner’s (the author of Launch) website), the Lee County Rec. Center can take away these lessons and tips. It’s all about the numbers: Post in an obvious area the number of page views, twitter followers, facebook fans, blog views, etc. In multiple locations on the page “display the number of people who have shared or liked [the page’s content] on facebook” If lots of people have been viewing a page, twitter, facebook, etc. it makes that page more credible to potential viewers and readers. An awesome thing about facebook is that it does all of the work for a business, it even displays the names of the people a website viewer is friends with that have shared a page’s content on the page near the content. If people see that friends that they respect have been reading something and are interested in it, they are more likely to read it themselves.
  • The Lee County Recreational Center is putting effort into its Social Media. They are newly on Twitter! Andy Owens just added their pizza joint to Urbanspoon. He has four-and-a-half stars on yelp, an extensive Facebook, he is on Google places, and has a blog that is well linked. He has a vision, and he is acting upon it. However, Mr. Owens still needs some direction. Mr. Owen’s oldest device, his Facebook, has a great deal going for it! He has numerous pictures of customers from the community: the trick is he has all the tagged. This is a great tactic to cause the tagged individuals to “like” his Facebook, or just traffic his page more frequently. Also, his Facebook is linked to the Recreational Center’s blog, allowing everyone to see the activity on his page. He posts score cards of the top bowled games after each week. Again, causing the community to traffic his Facebook, because they are interested in their scores (he is using Launch tactics and giving consumers what they want, and thus drawing a large base). The Lee County Recreational Center’s has great reviews on yelp, and none on Urbanspoon (yet). They need some rearranging on Google locations. But just the fact that they are on all of these sights shows that the Recreational Center is pioneering social media. They are a beacon to the other businesses in Lee County. we hope to help promote their business and allow them to continue to assist the surrounding entities.
  • Creating a more service focused sector of industry. Perry County provides a unique experience with local assets that could be tapped as tourism developmental resources. There’s not a lack of appeal, but a lack of reach. In other words, there is a disconnect between destination seeking tourists and the assets of Perry County that may suit their interests. What is the resolution to this problem? Advertisement with a longer reach, found most appropriately in the form of social media. Believe it or not, tourism is the third largest industry in Kentucky, providing $3.3 billion in Kentucky salaries annually (KTIA.com). This is despite only 34% of first-time Kentucky visitors actually recalling seeing any advertisements or promotions for Kentucky prior to their visit, according to a 2011 study of Kentucky tourists (Kentucky Visitor Profile Summary).
  • Tourism however, is on the rise. The tourism and travel industry contributed nearly $11.7 billion to Kentucky’s economy in 2011. Direct expenditures by tourists accounted for $7.4 billion of this total —an increase of 3.0 percent since 2010. A total of 169,932 jobs in Kentucky resulted from the industry in 2011—up 674 jobs from 2010. Direct expenditures created 118,917 of these jobs. The tourism-generated jobs provided over $2.6 billion in wages to Kentucky workers—an increase of $76 million from 2010 wages. In the Daniel Boone Region, where Perry County is located, there was a 1.6% increase. By incorporating tourism into the economy more, jobs could be created to replace those lost.
  • BACKGROUND: As the coal industry is declining, so is the economy of the Eastern Kentucky. -recent 750 job cuts by the coal company, Arch Coal Inc and 600 of them have directly affected Kentucky. -Tourism is the 3 rd largest industry in KY. -3.3 billion dollars in salaries annually.
  • 69% come for short pleasure trip. 53% use internet as primary source for planning. 34% do not recall seeing any promotions or advertisements. 81% come for peace and relaxation. 72% come for the clean and unspoiled environment. 20% mention campgrounds. They stay 3.9 nights. 53% visited state parks.37% visit historical sites. 87% drive to the region. 96% later recommend their visit. Average Income: $68,560. Average Age: 50.8. Average Travel Group Size: 3.
  • According to a global 2012 study of 28,000 consumers in 56 countries conducted by Neilsen, online consumer recommendations are the second most trusted source of brand advertising, second only to “recommendations from people I know.”
  • Purpose: Berea is a town rich in history, arts and crafts, sustainability, local foods and great outdoor environment for activities from hiking, golf , fishing and shooting. As any other community, Berea seeks to advance its economic development by diversifying its economic sectors. One of the sectors that Berea has a significant potential in tapping to increase job opportunities and promote local businesses is Tourism. This presentation is going to assess tourism assets by summarizing a tour of Berea by an hypothetical tourist for 36 hours.
  • Life Style Miss Arthur, 32, lives in Nashville,TN. Senior partner at a consulting firm, $ 120,000 income per year. hiking plays golf , shooting fishing and hunting . Has a keen appreciation of arts and crafts. decorate the home, give as gifts or resell to other art galleries. Miss Arthur likes taking holidays for escapism purposes after completing a major project at work. Married one child. Travelling with husband, budget $ 1500 .
  • Escapism and Esthetics Stress free, thrilling activities – hunting, biking, shooting sports … A good time outdoors, great pictures and memories . Post photos on social networks and share with family and friends Buy gifts for colleagues, customers, family and friends. Buy decorative items for the home.
  • For 28 years Dinner Bell and its two co-owners Bob & Velra Stewart have served delicious meals, friendly or as they say-southern friendly. Breakfast menu is available all the time.  Home cooked food, dished generously with friendly smile and skilled staff .  The pan cakes, fried shrimp and biscuits are real good some of the best you will ever taste .
  • Indian fort mountain trails (made up of 10 trail routes) (mapped) is part of the Berea College forest– one of the oldest privately managed forests in the country since 1898. One of the trails about 6 miles long known as “ Indian Fort shared use trail” heading to the pinnacle is being developed by Berea City Council and fitted with lighting . Enjoy a bike ride in this scenic, historical forest and take a thrilling hike rewarded by scenic view from the top of Indian Fort Mountain.
  • 1pm: excellent Italian restaurant proved mastery of the art of pizza making , also popular for its tasty garlic bread sticks that accompany every choice on the menu. The most revered pizza choice is the mountaineer which has a variety of toppings for your taste. And if you are fun of pasta and spaghetti, the place to be is still papa lenos. I also love their chicken grilled sandwich with butter milk sauce –grab that for lunch .
  • An evening of music from 8.30 pm and enjoying desserts .Main Street Café, conveniently located in the college square by the Boone Tavern Hotel . Dessert choices include irresistible blueberry pie , humming bird cake , Godiva Cheese cake or Vanilla Ice cream .
  • David Kretzmann From Nevada City, California Rising junior – Berea College Business Marketing major
  • Case study: Joseph Atkins.
  • 45 years old.
  • 6:00 AM Tuesda - Departs Cincinnati
  • 8:45 AM: Three Forks Historical Center. Directly along his travel route. Called ahead to Billie Haddix – overseer of historical center.
  • Found center through review on TripAdvisor. Looked for historical destinations/museums along his driving route.
  • 11:15 AM: Breathitt County War Memorial. Downtown Jackson, KY. Testament to Breathitt County citizens who fought in 20 th century wars.
  • “ Bloody Breathitt” Slayden Douthitt Time Capsule
  • 12:15 PM – Old Country Inn. Inexpensive lunch, personable service.
  • While awaiting meal – Joseph decides to see if any locations in Breathitt County have a presence on Facebook. Breathitt County Public Library has active Facebook page - over 1,000 “likes.” Joseph loves books – wants to accumulate knowledge about region. While eating, plans to spend at least an hour at library. 1:30 PM: Goes to library.
  • 3:00 PM: Breathitt County Museum. Features local artifacts and significant heritage items from the county. Coal and geography history exhibit. War exhibit. Original pictures from early 20 th century.
  • 7:30 AM - Wednesday : Eats breakfast at lodge Leaves lodge at 8:00 AM Arrives in downtown Hindman, KY, at 9:00 AM. – NOTHING OPEN BEFORE 10 AM! Reevaluates plan; decides to drive 25 minutes to Alice Lloyd College. Alice Lloyd, founded in 1923; four-year liberal arts work college. Serves Appalachian students in Appalachian region. Joseph spends approximately 40 minutes at the college
  • Googled “Alice Lloyd College” while reevaluating morning plans. Found two reviews on Google – helped finalize decision for morning travels.
  • 10:30 AM: Kentucky School of Craft. “ Hands-on history” – Appalachian history is ongoing, not just in a book. Woodworking, jewelry, statues, etc. Friendly staff and artisans. Views exhibits. Observes the artists at work.
  • 11:15 AM: Marie Stewart Museum & Craft Shop. View finished authentic Appalachian products – blankets, woodworking, and more. Might run into Rachael Ware – Berea student working at craft shop in summer.
  • 1:00 PM – Appalachian Artisan Center Studio. Visits the woodshop and other interactive artisan studios and galleries. Loves interacting with the artists and their specialties. Can view works in progress, as well as finished products.
  • Top rated restaurant destination on Yelp in Hindman area. Detailed reviews helped Joseph make his decision.
  • 2:00 PM – Hindman Settlement School. Tour of the school and surrounding environment. Meets with friendly staffers including Rebecca Ware. Learns of newly renovated system of trails. Wildlife scavenger hunt. (find wildflowers, etc.)
  • 6:30 PM – Jabo’s State of Mine Eats: The Full Monte Cristo. Unique establishment with Eastern Kentucky pride and history. Pictures of famous individuals born in Kentucky (George Clooney, Johnny Depp, Diane Sawyer) Fun Kentucky facts on entrance wall in Jabo’s. (Did you know that in KY it is illegal to transport an ice cream in your pocket?)
  • Jabo’s: one of Hazard’s highest rated restaurants on Yelp. Strong reviews and ratings. Detailed descriptions of food and service.
  • 9:00 AM - Thursday: Log Cathedral Buckhorn Lake Area Church. Passed by Log Cathedral Lake Area Church several times while driving to and from Buckhorn Lake State Park. Unique display of the church piqued his curiosity – Looked up cathedral online. Learns that free tours are available daily from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM by request. Built in 1928. Testament to 20 th century Appalachian culture. Preservation of important aspect of mountain life, culture, and history in Appalachia.
  • Once returning home from their rally the Westons… Uploaded multiple pictures on facebook Wrote reviews on their food and lodging Told their friends about their trip and passed along their brochures Planned an annual trip to Hazard for the Cherokee Rally Tag- A-Long
  • 36 Hours in Kradd
  • For this presentation as I said earlier, I virtually designed a persona that is interested of spending 36 hours in this region doing a set of activities. However, the idea of this persona came about talking and observing similar personality travelling in the region or interested in asset present in the region. So, let me introduce to you the Rogers Family. Mr. Roger is 45 and his wife is 43 . They have two boys, George and William . They were from Kansas and moved to Frankfort, Kentucky two years ago. Mr. Rogers works in an insurance company and his wife works in a community development Non-profit. They are very family oriented; they like to be around their nuclear and extended family. They like discovering new places and enjoy outdoor events. They all use Smartphone and are very familiar with Social Media. They heard about Mary Breckinridge Festival in Hyden, Leslie County for three year but never got the opportunity to attend to it. Recently they saw an advertisement about the festival on Facebook and considering their free agenda this year, they decided to attend the show.
  • The Rogers like outdoor adventure such as Canoeing,Golfing, camping, fishing etc. They usually do all of their activities as a family and like trying new things. Due to his passion, Mr. Roger has 2 kayaks and a canoe and love using with his family whenever the time and weather allows him. In addition to that, they enjoy exotic stuff and like anything that pertains to nature. In fact, Mr. Roger grew up in a rural settlement and then developed strong passion for outdoor activities. Because of her job, Mrs. Rogers does a lot work in rural areas developing partnership with community leaders in order to help them promote economic development. She affirms that some of the best moment of her life is being out there in nature doing activities with her colleagues. Since she heard about Mary Breckinridge, she started admiring her for her work and wanted to attend of the festival where they recognize her. Because of their passion for social developemnt, they want to experience more of these and expose their children to it, when possible.
  • For this trip, the couple plans to experience fully an event they planned to attend 3 years ago. They are looking forward to the Festival and hope to reconnect with region through it because their parents are actually from the Kentucky. George and William also hope to enjoy their first experience in this environment. Around this festival, the family also planned to explore the KRADD region and take advantage of the attraction they came across on Social Media such as the pioneer villages, Buckhorn lake area, zip lining, golf courses etc. Therefore, they also planned a set of activities in neighboring counties where they will get the chance to first know the region and fulfill their desire to experience the esthetic and culture of the place. for this trip, the couple budget $1000 total and want to make the most of this experience. Because of their occupation, they cannot spend more than 36 hours in the region. The Rogers like to be comfortable and want to stay at a place where they will feel at home. Therefore, they will very picky about their accommodation.
  • For the trip, they plan to visit three counties: Owsley, Leslie and Wolfe. They arrived Friday at 1PM in Owsley County and check in Sinclaire Bed & Breakfast. Considering the heat of the weather, they ask Claire about a place where they could have ice scream and she tells them about Spencer’s
  • http://www.yelp.com/biz/sag-hollow-golf-club-booneville
  • At 4:30PM the family gathers and decides to go golfing. At their arrival at the place, they are welcome by the manager who gives them the information about the business. He tells them that a group of individual who decided to accomplish something for their community created the golfe course. He also tell them that along with the voluntarism express by community member , they step by step managed to put in place the facility and developed a partnership with the High School in Booneville to offers free golf course to the students. The Rogers are impressed with the initiative and spend 2 hours playing golf and competing with each other. Eventually at the end of the game the dad wins due to his experience in the game.
  • From the golf course, the family heads back to Hometown Café for Dinner at 6:30PM. At their arrival, they are very well welcome by Kim, the manager of the Restaurant. In fact, after the game, they wanted to eat something very consistent and a well cooked. Looking at reviews of the eating around town, they found reviews of people of town saying positive comment about the place and they decided to check it out. Of course they enjoyed their food and appreciated the home cooked meal all from scratch.
  • On Saturday, the couple grabs breakfast early in the morning and drive to Hyden to attend the opening of the ceremony . While attending this festival, the couple wanted to really be in the moment. Mrs. Rogers actually registered to run the 5K t hat set the opening of the Festival. They arrived at 8AM in Hyden, and she checks in and run the 5K. She eventually did not win but had an experience that she will remember for a lifetime .
  • After the 5K, they head to wendover where they reserve two rooms for a night. They check in, Mrs. Rogers takes a shower and they head back to Hyden to enjoy the rest of the festival
  • They first get a tour of the Frontier Nursing University. At the tour, they get to see the chapel and the reputation it has for being a venue for couples’ union , they also see the old hospital that became the administration building and finally the dorms. At the dorm, they heard about the tradition that students developed at decorating the rooms to materialize their class. The family enjoys the tour and takes beautiful picture while they go from place to place.
  • After lunch at 1.30PM, while they were driving downtown, they saw the Go-Kart Park, George and William show interest, and they stop by. After a first drive, they invited their parents who felt shy but decided to try it anyway. They end up spending an hour at the park and played 5 races .
  • At 2:30, they leave the Go-Kart Park for the festival again; they drive to the Nixon recreational Center to see some exhibitions of local flavor and Mary’s life . There they get to see local artist exhibit their work and since they like local flavor, they do not hesitate to buy some artwork . They also visit, booth portraying Mary’s life and the work she has for the community, they learned a lot about her and fell very proud of what she has done.
  • On Sunday, they grab breakfast at 8AM, and get ready to see other place around town before they leave . Looking at Google local of the existing attraction in town, they found the Miners Memorial. Located at 5 minutes of the Bed and Breakfast, they drive to the memorial at 9AM. They walk around, take pictures of the Memorial and empathized for these men who lost their life so that they could get their daily comfort through electricity.
  • From there, they leave Hyden to Wolfe County that they preliminary looked for through yelp and Google local. After an hour and half drive, they get to Red River Gorge at 11.30AM. They meet the manager of Ken who welcomes them and they drive to the river. They Kayak for 2 hours
  • and drive to Miguel’s Place after seeing wonderful reviews about the food and the atmosphere . While walking from the parking lot to the restaurant, they felt very surprise to see the incredible huge number of cars out of state, stopping by to eat and camp. They order pizza and love it, and they then understood why so many people stop by. At 3PM, they drive back to Frankfort after having a great and memorable weekend.
  • After the family leave, there are 3 ways to actually measure the impact of their experience . Amount some are measurable only in the long run. First, we see how can follow up on this family and see what they say on social media platform about places they have to. By that, I mean the reviews that people write about their experience. It is important that businesses look at Social Medias to see what people say about them and follow up on them if possible. For instance, after reviewing a hotel in Berea the manager, contact me to thank me and offer me a discount for next stay. Another impact can be measure when Mrs. Roger for instance starts working with the Action Team in Booneville or the Library after the conversation they had. By that, I mean that we do much of a great job in our community to be overlook by others or not letting them being involved. Through tourism, we can introduce outsiders to the community development work we are doing in a saddle way and even get them to be involve. Lastly, another impact could to see this family come back in the region . Either it is a for the festival or something else, we could measure the impact of their experience when back to the region for another reason that was facilitate by their first experience.
  • In conclusion, it is important to recognize that we have great assets capable to bring people from all over the place. We have to first be proud about it and introduce outsiders to these assets in a strategic way. We are in an age where technology moves a speed of light create impact along its ways. Another thing is that thing is that it is very cheap and easy to use. One thing we can do on this platform is to be just present and an invite people to tell about their experience. Then we get people around the world to hear about what we have here, and even see pictures if we upload them. For instance, I started using trip Adviser 6 weeks ago and wrote just 9 reviews. 529 people have seen the reviews among which 1 is from Germany and the rest is from country. More by inviting more people to write, we expose our assets to the world and it can be seen easily.
  • At least 115 million Americans lived within a day’s driving distance of Appalachia, and the region’s water, forests, and cultural resources increasingly appealed to urban hikers, campers, kayakers, fishermen, and families seeking relaxation and cultural enrichment. In parts of the region less scarred by environmental destruction, outfitters, bed and breakfast accommodations, restaurants, and other small businesses multiplied to serve urban tourists seeking outdoor adventure. Festivals celebrating mountain music and crafts and fairs promoting local farm products, homecomings, historical reenactments, and community gatherings of all kinds brought dollars into local economies, supported local shop owners, and sustained a sense of local pride.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Rural Community Economic Development through Service Learning: A Pedagogical Framework and Case Study in Appalachia’s Distressed Rural CommunitiesAli B. Djire, Peter H. Hackbert, Ability A. Kakama, David Kretzmann Entrepreneurship for the Public Good Program Berea College, Berea KY Gulf South Conference 2013 Louisville, KY February 27- March 3, 2013 03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 1
    • 2. EPG searches for “real-world” solutions • Mission statement - educating and inspiring students from Appalachia to become service-oriented leaders • 1,600 liberal arts students • 150 yearsWhat better way to encourage young Appalachians to start their own businesses than to reach out to them while they’re still trying to figure out what they should be doing with their lives?
    • 3. The EPG Program defines “Entrepreneurial Leadership” as:"A process when one person or a group ofpeople in a community originate an idea orinnovation for a needed change and influenceothers in that community to commit torealizing that change, despite the presence ofrisk, ambiguity, or uncertainty".
    • 4. The pedagogical approach of service learning is growing in popularity across all areas ofundergraduate education including entrepreneurshipSource: Klink & Athaide, 2004; Tomkovick, Lester, Flunter & Well, 2008; Litzky,Godshalk & Walton-Bongers, 2012)03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 4
    • 5. The EPG Program qualifies as service-learning because……”a course or competency-based, credit bearingeducational experience in which students:(a) participate in mutually identified service activities thatbenefit the community,(b) reflect on the service activity in such a way as to gainfurther understanding of course content, a broaderappreciation of the discipline, and an enhanced sense ofpersonal values and civic responsibility. Source: Clayton, Bringle & Hatcher, 2013: 6
    • 6. 13 States of Appalachia
    • 7. poverty and unemployment rates outpace the national average 1Appalachian Regional Commission Distressed Counties - 2009 and 1/2 times, and per capita income falls two-thirds below the national average.
    • 8. Where we do our service for 6 yearsBerea Kentucky
    • 9. Source: Ezzell,T., Lambert, D., and E.Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 03/19/13 Ogle. Strategies to Economic Improvement in Appalachia’s 9Distressed Rural Counties, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Washington DC: ARC. February 2012.
    • 10. Source: Ezzell,T., Lambert, D., and E.Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 03/19/13 Ogle. Strategies to Economic Improvement in Appalachia’s 10Distressed Rural Counties, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Washington DC: ARC. February 2012.
    • 11. Source: Ezzell,T., Lambert, D., and E.Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 03/19/13 Ogle. Strategies to Economic Improvement in Appalachia’s 11Distressed Rural Counties, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Washington DC: ARC. February 2012.
    • 12. “Uneven Ground” UK Professor of History: Ronald Eller www.google.com/images03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 12
    • 13. …growing popularity of ecotourism and heritage tourism…contained the potential for building an alternative economy, one that promised greater monetary returns for local residents, the preservation of rural traditions, and the protection of sensitive natural resources. - Ronald D. Eller, Uneven Ground, The University of Kentucky Press, 2008: 256.03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 13
    • 14. 5 Years Research• Demographic Analysis• Economic Analysis•Entrepreneurship• Community Survey• Site visits (14x10x5) 700 night stays03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 14
    • 15. Year 1 Youth Entrepreneurship03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 15
    • 16. Southeast Kentucky High Schools College Education and Earnings 120 Kentucky Counties, 2000 United States $50,000 25.1 % college $45,000 Hickman Scott $36,400 earningsAverage Annual Earnings per Job, 2000 $40,000 $35,000 Fayette $30,000 $25,000 Oldham $20,000 $15,000 Edmondson Lewis $10,000 McLean $5,000 $0 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 % of Adults with College Degree, 2000
    • 17. Youth Demonstrate “an idea, a concept, and an opportunity”
    • 18. Posting the judges scores
    • 19. Announce the Youth Awards
    • 20. EPG first Business save Restore
    • 21. Year 2 Pedagogical Concepts03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 21
    • 22. Gates Foundation
    • 23. Insert the word stakeholder or “co-creator” for customer03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 23
    • 24. Ideation, Prototyping
    • 25. Year 3 Identify Community Partner Nascent Entrepreneurs03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 28
    • 26. Cultural
    • 27. Peer to Peer Workshops
    • 28. Year 4 Demonstration Skills03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 31
    • 29. Understanding how to navigate Entrepreneurial Leadership g
    • 30. Our Social Entrepreneurship awards continue
    • 31. Model Map – A Painter’s CanvasSource: Alexander Osterwalder, Business Model Generation
    • 32. 2012 Kentucky Young Entrepreneur Award 03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 35
    • 33. What has changed in just the last five years? "Facebook didnt exist;Twitter was a sound; thecloud was in the sky; 4G was a parking place; LinkedIn was a prison; applications were whatyou sent to college; and Skype for most people was typo."
    • 34. They useFacebook 03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 37
    • 35. 03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 38
    • 36. Google Search03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College Website 39
    • 37. 03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 40
    • 38. Year 503/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 41
    • 39. Key Question Can Social Media be a tool to develop an alternative economy in Appalachian communities?03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 42
    • 40. We observed and we listened to the Kentucky River Area Development District business owners, attraction and destination operators.03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 43
    • 41. Kentucky Visitor Profile Study Daniel Boone Country Region September 2010 – August 2011 Visitors Prepared for: The Commonwealth of Kentucky Department of Travel and Tourism Prepared by:03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 44
    • 42. 3rd largest industry in Kentucky, Tourism is theproviding $3.3 billion in salaries annually This is despite only 34% of first-time Kentuckyvisitors actually recalling seeing any advertisements or promotions for Kentucky prior to their visit.03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 45
    • 43. The tourism and travel industry contributed nearly $11.7 billion to Kentucky’s economy in 2011.—an increase of 3.0 percentIn the Daniel Boone Region, where the KRADD is located, there was a 1.6% increase03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 46
    • 44. Key FactsVisitors come to Daniel Boone Country Region•It is peaceful/relaxing (81%),• It is a safe destination (74%),• There is plenty to see and do (72%),• It is a good value for the money (71%)• The clean unspoiled environment (72%) 03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 47
    • 45. The Daniel Boone Country VisitorAverage Income : $68,560Average Age: 50.8Average Travel Group Size: 369% short pleasure trip53% use internet 03/19/13 Peter 96%Recommend their visit to others: H. Hackbert, Berea College 48
    • 46. 03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 49
    • 47. 115 million Americans live within a day’s driving distance03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 50
    • 48. Imagine How would you spend 36 hours in the KRADD region?03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 51
    • 49. 36 Hours in the KRADD Region03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 52
    • 50. Online consumer recommendations are the second most trusted source of brand advertising, second only to“recommendations from people I know” ina global 2012 study of 28,000 consumers in 56 countriesSource: Nielson, “Consumer Trust in Online, Social and Mobile Advertising Grows, 201203/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 53
    • 51. "The traveler/tourist persona profile gives you a chance to truly empathize with targetmarket segments, stepping out of the role as someone who wants to promote a product and see, through your travelers eyes…” Peter H. Hackbert03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 54
    • 52. 34 Personas03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 55
    • 53. 1. Traveler and Tourist Personas A weekend – 36 hours - in Berea FOR ADVENTURE AND LOVE OF THE ARTS Ability Kakama Sophomore, Economics Major Tanzania
    • 54. Personal / Lifestyle Google Images
    • 55. Travel GoalsGoogle Images
    • 56. Yelp for Restaurants
    • 57. 7:00 pm Dinner at Dinner Bell Local image Jun 2012
    • 58. 8:00 am Bike and Hike Indian Fort (Pinnacle) Berea College website (map) and Google Images
    • 59. It is why I bought a Smartphone!
    • 60. 12 noon Lunch at Papaleno’s Take Away Google Images
    • 61. Night Life in Berea, Saturday?
    • 62. Dessert and Night of Music8.30 pm Main Street Cafe Google Images/ Main Street Café Website
    • 63. Checking next day’s destinations
    • 64. Next: What Visitors Do Google Images
    • 65. Reflection Session Framework “I learned that” … “I learned this when” …. “This learning matters because” … “In light of this learning” …Source: Clayton, P.H. (2012). Generating, Deepening, and Documenting Learning: Practical Tools for CriticalReflection in Service-Learning, Center for Excellence in Learning through Service Campus Christian Center &Center for Transformative Learning, Berea College, February 3, 201203/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 68
    • 66. 2. Traveler and Tourist Personas An Escape Through EasternKentucky’s Appalachian History 36 Hours in Eastern Kentucky’s Historic KRADD Region David Kretzmann, Junior, BusinessDavid Kretzmann Junior, Berea College Marketing Major Major: Business Marketing
    • 67. Joseph Atkins03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 70 Images.google.com Images.google.com
    • 68. 45 years old Works in Cincinnati Restaurant Manager Married No children 45 Years Old History Buff Social Media Experience Wife is in Chicago $1,100 budget Travels by car03/19/13 Visit a buddy at Alice Lloyd college Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 71 Images.google.com
    • 69. 6:00 AM - Tuesday Departs Cincinnati Images.google.com
    • 70. 8:45 AM Lee County Tourism Center 03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 73Facebook.com/DigitalAppalachia
    • 71. What got him to stop?03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 74 Tripadvisor.co
    • 72. 11:15 AM Breathitt County War Memorial Facebook.com/DigitalAppalachia
    • 73. Facebook.com/DigitalAppalachia
    • 74. 12:15 PM Old Country Inn 03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 77 Facebook.com/DigitalAppalachia
    • 75. 03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 78
    • 76. 1:30 PM Breathitt County Public Library Facebook.com Facebook.com/DigitalAppalachia
    • 77. 3:00 PM Breathitt County Museum Museum Facebook.com/DigitalAppalachia
    • 78. 9:30 AM - Wednesday Alice Lloyd College 03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 81 Facebook.com/DigitalAppalachia
    • 79. Google.com
    • 80. 10:30 AM Kentucky School of Craft Facebook.com/DigitalAppalachia
    • 81. Deals/Discounts03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 84
    • 82. 11:15 AM Marie Stewart Museum & Crafts Shop Facebook.com/DigitalAppalachia
    • 83. Lunch Special03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 86
    • 84. 1:00 PM Appalachian Artisan Center Studio 03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 87 Facebook.com/DigitalAppalachia
    • 85. Appalachian Artisan Center Studio03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 88 Yelp.com
    • 86. 2:00 PM Hindman Settlement School Facebook.com/DigitalAppalachia
    • 87. Yelp Review: Hindman Settlement School 03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 90
    • 88. 6:30 PM Jabo’s State of Mine Yelp.com Facebook.com: Jalissa Hunter
    • 89. Yelp.com
    • 90. 9:00 AM - Thursday Log Cathedral Buckhorn Lake Area Church Facebook.com: Indigenous Innovators
    • 91. Store decals03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 94
    • 92. Joseph Atkins Next Steps• Returning home from his trip• Uploaded multiple pictures on Facebook• Wrote reviews on Yelp, Google+ and TripAdvisor• Told his friends about his trip and passed along his comments• Planned an annual trip to Perry County, KY03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 95
    • 93. Reflection Session Framework “I learned that” … “I learned this when” …. “This learning matters because” … “In light of this learning” …Source: Clayton, P.H. (2012). Generating, Deepening, and Documenting Learning: Practical Tools for CriticalReflection in Service-Learning, Center for Excellence in Learning through Service Campus Christian Center &Center for Transformative Learning, Berea College, February 3, 201203/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 96
    • 94. 3. Traveler and Tourist Personas03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 97
    • 95. 3. Traveler and Tourist Personas ONE DESTINATION, A FAMILY & A RECONNECTION 36 Hours in Kentucky River Development District Ali B. Djire, Sophomore, Business & Agriculture Burkina Faso
    • 96. Personahttp://google.com/images/
    • 97. Lifestyle• Insurance Company• & Community development• Non-Profit Junior in High School 7th Grade soccer player
    • 98. Goals Vs Limitation http://google.com/images/
    • 99. FridaySinclaire Bed & Breakfast 1:00 PM Photo from Maverick TrailBloggers
    • 100. http://www.yelp.com/biz/spencers-dairy-bar-booneville
    • 101. http://www.yelp.com/biz/sag-hollow-golf-club-booneville
    • 102. Golfing 4:30 PMPhoto from Maverick TrailBloggers
    • 103. Hometown Cafe 6:30 PM http://google.com/images/
    • 104. 5K in Leslie County 8:00 AM http://google.com/images/
    • 105. http://www.yelp.com/biz/wendover-bed-and-breakfast-inn-wendover
    • 106. Wendover Bed & Breakfast 10:00AM Photo from Maverick TrailBloggers
    • 107. Tour of Frontier Nursing 11:00AM UniversityPhoto from Maverick TrailBloggers
    • 108. Creekside Go-Kart Track2:00 PM Photo from Maverick TrailBloggers
    • 109. Nixon Center 3:00 PM http://google.com/images/
    • 110. Sunday 9:00 AMHurricane Creek Memorial Photo from Maverick TrailBloggers
    • 111. Kayak in Wolfe County 11:00 AM http://www.redriveradventure.net/
    • 112. Miguel’s Reviewhttp://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g39858-d405893-Reviews-Miguel_s_Pizza_Rock_Climbing-Slade_Kentucky.html
    • 113. PIZZA AT MIGUEL’S 3:00 PM http://google.com/images/
    • 114. Impact Measurement http://google.com/images/
    • 115. Next Step http://www.tripadvisor.com/
    • 116. Reflection Session Framework “I learned that” … “I learned this when” …. “This learning matters because” … “In light of this learning” …Source: Clayton, P.H. (2012). Generating, Deepening, and Documenting Learning: Practical Tools for CriticalReflection in Service-Learning, Center for Excellence in Learning through Service Campus Christian Center &Center for Transformative Learning, Berea College, February 3, 201203/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 119
    • 117. So What?03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 120
    • 118. EPG Small Rural Appalachian Community Economic Development ModelTraditional ED Strategy / Tool Direct, Short-term Economic • Tourism Outcomes • jobs Economic Development • firms Approaches eAlternative ED Strategy / Tool 1. Strengthen/expand • Entrepreneurship economy existing firms • Cluster-based development 2. Promote new firms • Local Living Economies Other • Residential development Outcomes • social / civicCD Capacity Building Strategy / • environmentalTool Indirect, Long-term • Transportation • Broadband / Internet / Social Media 03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 121
    • 119. 1,214 Social Media Reviews 250,000 free views03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 122
    • 120. 03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 123
    • 121. Now What?03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 124
    • 122. …link ecotourism and heritage tourism………..contained the potential for building an alternative economy, one that promises greater monetary returns for local residents, the preservation of rural traditions, and the protection of sensitive natural resources to [SOMOLO] social, mobile, local, economy03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 125
    • 123. Perry County Chamber Actions1. Recommend KCTC execute social/mobile certificate program2. Expand the Tourism Definition3. Use KY State Park Assets4. Explore KY Trail Town models5. Stimulate social media for the local economy via mobile6. Collaborate across KRADD county lines03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 126
    • 124. What If?03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 127
    • 125. Chamber of Commerce Timeline 1. Regional youth KRADD Multi- sporting event county SOMOLO 2. Annual festival “prototype” 3. Reenactments Startup 54 hour 4. Buy Local Campaign Event 5. Three businesses we can’t do withoutCollaborative KCTC Chamber-Student Chamber-Student 2013 EPG Certification with Projects enter Ventures gain $ from Project Chamber CBCC & / or KHIC / SKED / business partner AINS Contest MACED 03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 128
    • 126. Any Questions or Comments??03/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 129
    • 127. Reflection Session Framework “I learned that” … “I learned this when” …. “This learning matters because” … “In light of this learning” …Source: Clayton, P.H. (2012). Generating, Deepening, and Documenting Learning: Practical Tools for CriticalReflection in Service-Learning, Center for Excellence in Learning through Service Campus Christian Center &Center for Transformative Learning, Berea College, February 3, 201203/19/13 Peter H. Hackbert, Berea College 130

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