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Business Model You (Eastern Kentucky University Presentation)
Business Model You (Eastern Kentucky University Presentation)
Business Model You (Eastern Kentucky University Presentation)
Business Model You (Eastern Kentucky University Presentation)
Business Model You (Eastern Kentucky University Presentation)
Business Model You (Eastern Kentucky University Presentation)
Business Model You (Eastern Kentucky University Presentation)
Business Model You (Eastern Kentucky University Presentation)
Business Model You (Eastern Kentucky University Presentation)
Business Model You (Eastern Kentucky University Presentation)
Business Model You (Eastern Kentucky University Presentation)
Business Model You (Eastern Kentucky University Presentation)
Business Model You (Eastern Kentucky University Presentation)
Business Model You (Eastern Kentucky University Presentation)
Business Model You (Eastern Kentucky University Presentation)
Business Model You (Eastern Kentucky University Presentation)
Business Model You (Eastern Kentucky University Presentation)
Business Model You (Eastern Kentucky University Presentation)
Business Model You (Eastern Kentucky University Presentation)
Business Model You (Eastern Kentucky University Presentation)
Business Model You (Eastern Kentucky University Presentation)
Business Model You (Eastern Kentucky University Presentation)
Business Model You (Eastern Kentucky University Presentation)
Business Model You (Eastern Kentucky University Presentation)
Business Model You (Eastern Kentucky University Presentation)
Business Model You (Eastern Kentucky University Presentation)
Business Model You (Eastern Kentucky University Presentation)
Business Model You (Eastern Kentucky University Presentation)
Business Model You (Eastern Kentucky University Presentation)
Business Model You (Eastern Kentucky University Presentation)
Business Model You (Eastern Kentucky University Presentation)
Business Model You (Eastern Kentucky University Presentation)
Business Model You (Eastern Kentucky University Presentation)
Business Model You (Eastern Kentucky University Presentation)
Business Model You (Eastern Kentucky University Presentation)
Business Model You (Eastern Kentucky University Presentation)
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Business Model You (Eastern Kentucky University Presentation)

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This presentation illustrates the value of the Busienss Model You as an innovative, visual tool to assessing who you are and what you can do.

This presentation illustrates the value of the Busienss Model You as an innovative, visual tool to assessing who you are and what you can do.

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  • 1985: First Blockbuster store opens in Dallas.1994: Viacom acquires Blockbuster for $8.4 billion.1997: Reed Hastings returns Apollo 13 to Blockbuster six weeks overdue, and is dismayed by the $40 late fee. 1998: Reed Hastings founds Netflix.1999: Viacom holds Blockbuster IPO, valued at up to $4.8 billion.2000: Blockbuster declines several offers to purchase Netflix for a mere $50 million. Instead, the company inks a 20-year deal to deliver on-demand movies with Enron Broadband Services, a subsidiary of energy trading giant Enron.2001: Enron files for bankruptcy amid accounting scandal.2002: Blockbuster debuts Super Bowl ad starring the voices of Jim Belushi and James Woods, as a rabbit and a guinea pig. The company posts a $1.6 billion loss.2003: Netflix posts first profit, earning $6.5 million on revenues of $272 million. Redbox launches a kiosk rental service. 2004: Blockbuster enters online DVD rental market. Netflix CEO Reed Hastings tells analysts in an earnings call, "In the last six months, Blockbuster has thrown everything but the kitchen sink at us." The following day, Hastings receives a package from Blockbuster. Inside: a kitchen sink. 2005: Blockbuster launches a marketing campaign touting its new "No Late Fees" policy. Subsequently, 48 states launch investigations into the program, charging Blockbuster with misrepresenting its late fee policy to customers. Blockbuster settles for $650,000. 2006: Blockbuster, now valued at $500 million, surpasses its goal of two million subscribers for its online platform. Netflix reaches 6.3 million subscribers by December.2007: Blockbuster hires new CEO Jim Keyes, formerly of 7-Eleven. Keyes decides to roll back the company's Total Access plans. "Clearly our spending on that one channel was exceeding our returns," he said during a company earnings call. After losing a half-million subscribers in the third quarter, Blockbuster announces it will no longer report its subscriber count.2008: Blockbuster proposes buying struggling electronics chain Circuit City. Blockbuster soon withdraws its offer after it's universally panned. Circuit City files for bankruptcy in November. Keyes also expresses doubt about Netflix in an interview: "I've been frankly confused by this fascination that everybody has with Netflix...Netflix doesn't really have or do anything that we can't or don't already do ourselves." 2009: Blockbuster rolls out Blockbuster Express, its kiosk system designed to compete with Redbox.March 2010: Blockbuster touts 28-day exclusive window over Netflix for new releases. The company also reintroduces late fees, which had been costing the company $300 million in revenue annually.May 2010: In an interview with Fast Company, Jim Keyes is asked whether Blockbuster's financial troubles were due in part to Netflix's success. "No, I don’t know where that comes from," he says. Keyes denies his company is going bankrupt. June 2010: Keyes compares Blockbuster to Apple, claiming that its On Demand service is the equivalent of the iMac. July 2010: Blockbuster launches Droid X app. Blockbuster is de-listed from the New York Stock Exchange after shares hit all time lows.August 2010: Though ailing from a debt of $900 million, Blockbuster's head of digital strategy explains, "We're strategically better positioned than almost anybody out there. Never in my wildest dreams would I have aimed this high." Blockbuster adds video games to by-mail subscription plans for no additional cost, but neglects to mention that new releases will not be available for three months. September 2010: Drowned in revenue losses of $1.1 billion, sources say Blockbuster plans to file for bankruptcy. The company is valued at just $24 million.
  • Employers expect to begin college recruitment programs earlier, identifying rising talent, and making more strategic connections with undergraduates before they leave school.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Business Model You Peter H. Hackbert DirectorEntrepreneurship for the Public Good Program Berea College
    • 2. Starting SwitchingReinventing a career
    • 3. Changing times, changing business models
    • 4. Blockbuster Video, Netflix, Redbox 1997 - Reed Hastings returns 2003 - Netflix 2002 - posts first Apollo 13 to1995 - Viacom Redbox profit, earning Blockbuster six acquires initially $6.5 million on weeksBlockbuster for funded by revenues of overdue, and is $8.4 billion. McDonalds $272 million. dismayed by the $40 late fee. 1998 - Reed 2010 - Hastings Blockbuster1984 - First founds plans to file forBlockbuster Netflix. bankruptcystore opens in Dallas.1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2013
    • 5. People must change, too
    • 6. Labor market inches ahead 3% gain over last year across all degreesSource: Gardner, P. (December 2012). Recruiting Trends 2012-2013, Career Services and the CollegiateEmployment Research Institute, Michigan State University .
    • 7. Employers complain of the shortage of qualified candidates, both new graduates an experienced talent.Source: Gardner, P. (December 2012). Recruiting Trends 2012-2013, Career Services and the CollegiateEmployment Research Institute, Michigan State University .
    • 8. John Calipari Effect
    • 9. “mediocre” increases in employment given the …. - Mark Zandi, Moody Analytics, chief economistSource: Gardner, P. (December 2012). Recruiting Trends 2012-2013, Career Services and the CollegiateEmployment Research Institute, Michigan State University .
    • 10. Employers Perceptions of the strength of the college labor market 2000-2012Source: Gardner, P. (December 2012). Recruiting Trends 2012-2013, Career Services and the CollegiateEmployment Research Institute, Michigan State University .
    • 11. Hiring Targets, 2012 & 2013Source: Gardner, P. (December 2012). Recruiting Trends 2012-2013, Career Services and the CollegiateEmployment Research Institute, Michigan State University .
    • 12. How do they find you?Source: Gardner, P. (December 2012). Recruiting Trends 2012-2013, Career Services and the CollegiateEmployment Research Institute, Michigan State University .
    • 13. Recruiting Strategies & HiringCampus Oriented Company Driven• Internship/Co-op Programs • Alumni from school 45% .? • Employee Referrals 40%• Career Fairs 61% • Social Media .?• Information Sessions 47% External Agents• Resume Referral 46% • Nation Web Aggregators .?• Faculty Connections . • Targeted Job Fairs 29%• On-campus Interviewing • General Job Fairs 28%• .? • Ads (professional outlets) 27%• Alumni Organization 19% • Consultants 22%
    • 14. Recruiting Strategies & HiringCampus Oriented Company Driven• Internship/Co-op Programs • Alumni from school 45% 62% • Employee Referrals 40%• Career Fairs 61% • Social Media 29%• Information Sessions 47% External Agents• Resume Referral 46% • Nation Web Aggregators 52%• Faculty Connections 41% • Targeted Job Fairs 29%• On-campus Interviewing • General Job Fairs 28% 37% • Ads (professional outlets) 27%• Alumni Organization 19% • Consultants 22%
    • 15. 10 Starting SalariesAll Majors $37,041All Liberal Arts 38,731Anthropology/Sociology 33,814Economics For your major and 40,481 three otherFinance 42,811 majors, predictHuman Resources 38,301 whether the 2013Marketing 38,874 starting salaries arePolitical Science 35,928 above or below thePsychology medium All Liberal 33,505Social Work Arts starting salary… $34,935
    • 16. 10 Starting Salaries All Majors $37,041 All Liberal Arts 38,731 Anthropology/Sociology 33,814 - Economics 40,481 + Finance 42,811 + Human Resources 38,301 - Marketing 38,874 + Political Science 35,928 - Psychology 33,505 - Social Work $34,935 -Source: Gardner, P. (December 2012). Recruiting Trends 2012-2013, Career Services and the CollegiateEmployment Research Institute, Michigan State University .
    • 17. Showcase your talents
    • 18. 6 Reasons to Enter the Event
    • 19. Every Organization Has a Business Model
    • 20. Consider yourself, a one-person organization
    • 21. The Business Model Canvas
    • 22. INSERT BUSINESS MODEL CANVAS ELEMENT HERE
    • 23. The Business Model Canvas KEY KEY VALUE CUSTOMER CLIENTS / PARTNER ACTIVITIES PROPOSITION RELATIONSHIPS CUSTOMER SEGMENTS KEY RESOURCES CHANNELS COST STRUCTURE REVENUE STREAMS2/16/2013 Peter H. Hackbert, Director, EPG, Berea College 25
    • 24. The Personal Business Model Canvas KEY KEY VALUE CUSTOMER CLIENTS / PARTNER ACTIVITIES PROPOSITION RELATIONSHIPS CUSTOMER SEGMENTS WHAT HOW YOU WHO YOU DO INTERACT WHO YOUHELPS HOW YOU HELP YOU KEY HELP RESOURCES CHANNELS WHO YOU HOW THEY ARE AND KNOW YOU WHAT YOU AND HOW HAVE YOU DELIVER COST REVENUE AND BENEFITS WHAT YOU GIVE WHAT YOU GET2/16/2013 Peter H. Hackbert, Director, EPG, Berea College 26
    • 25. Cover Story You

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