Hodges Model Podcast Part 1 Summary Slides 2006

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These 10 slides provide a summary to the first podcast introducing Hodges' model. Developed in health and social this conceptual framework can be used universally and comprises four knowledge (care) …

These 10 slides provide a summary to the first podcast introducing Hodges' model. Developed in health and social this conceptual framework can be used universally and comprises four knowledge (care) domains: sciences, INTRAPERSONAL, political and SOCIOLOGY.

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  • 1. Introductory notes:
    • Hodges model was created by Brian E. Hodges in the 1980s
    • This presentation is purposely basic and un-themed.
    • These 10 slides summarise the first* podcast on Hodges model posted online in late 2006:
    • http://www.archive.org/details/PeterJonesHodgesModelPodcastPart1WelcometotheQuad
    • See also the complete podcast notes (with suggested answers to the two questions).
    • Website: Hodges model
    • Blog: Welcome to the QUAD
    • Efforts are underway to create a new website using Drupal the content management system
    • Contact - h2cmng at yahoo.co.uk
    • *The second should be better!
  • 2. PODCAST Welcome to the Quad http://www.archive.org/details/PeterJonesHodgesModelPodcastPart1WelcometotheQuad An Introduction to Hodges Health Career Model Part 1 Presented by Peter Jones © 2006
  • 3. Aims & Objectives
    • how and why the model was formulated
    • its structure
    • rationale for its content
    • draw and label the model
    • describe the model’s axes
    • differentiate between the model’s care domains and their scope/content
    While developed in health and social care, Hodges model has universal potential
  • 4. Brian E Hodges
    • Brian was a senior lecturer at Manchester Metropolitan University, he retired in 2005
    • Taught on learning disability, community mental health, health visitor, district nursing and other programmes
    • Community Mental Health Nursing course - case study using Hodges model
    • 1985-87 nursing process, models
  • 5. Why bother?
    • Models are no longer flavour of the month.
    • In this age of multidisciplinary teams and integrated care surely nursing models have no role to play except possibly within nurse education.
    • If there was little or no time in the 80s and 90s for models in practise, then there certainly isn’t now.
    • And even if you are old enough to have the experience and things really do go round in circles this is one turn to many.
  • 6. Hodges model: developed to address four problems
    • To produce a curriculum development tool.
    • To help ensure holistic assessment and evaluation.
    • To support reflective practice, individually and in a group.
    • To reduce the theory-practice gap.
  • 7. Brian Hodges’ questions:
    • Who do nurses care for?
      • Individuals
      • Groups and whole populations: global health
    • What do nurses do?
      • Mechanistic: tasks, procedures, treatments
      • Humanistic: personal, empathy, caring
  • 8. Model diagrammatic formulation
    • Paper exercise - output:
  • 9. Key assumptions:
    • Physical care informed by the SCIENCES
    • Emotional care informed by INTERPERSONAL – Psychology
    • Health and Social Care theory and practice are centred on the individual and the situations encountered.
  • 10. Care Domains & Content
    • SCIENCES
    • POLITICAL
    • SOCIOLOGY
    • INTERPERSONAL
  • 11. Closing Questions
    • Sciences domain individual focus and yet groups must also be considered – public health. Is this a weakness of the model, or does it highlight the transition from individual care to care of groups which instantly becomes politicised?
    • Is there a concept common across all domains that constitutes a fourth assumption?