GSummit SF 2014 - The Designer’s Playbook for Persuasive Design by Matt Danna @mattdanna

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GSummit SF 2014 - The Designer’s Playbook for Persuasive Design by Matt Danna @mattdanna

  1. 1. @mattdanna MATTDANNA Designer’s Playbook iPERSUASIVEDESIGN
  2. 2. 7MatT DanNa VP, Product o
  3. 3. Define “Persuasive Design” Review a Case Study Explore Design Patterns Examine Anti-Patterns Learn How to Apply Persuasive Design f f f f f KGAME PLAN
  4. 4. IDISCLAIMER I will be discussing a lot of products, apps, and services throughout the course of this talk. 
 I all of them...well, most of them. ! Also, my views are their own, and do not necessarily reflect those of my employer. k
  5. 5. WHAT IS “PERSUASIVE DESIGN” ?c c
  6. 6. PERSUASIVE DESIGN is… Designing with the intent to: 1. Incite a new behavior, or 2. Modify existing behavior
  7. 7. Service Product Feature Interface Component SCOPE OF PERSUASION
  8. 8. Service Product Feature Interface Component SCOPE OF PERSUASION 1 PLACEHOLDER
  9. 9. Service Product Feature Interface Component SCOPE OF PERSUASION 1
  10. 10. Service Product Feature Interface Component SCOPE OF PERSUASION 1
  11. 11. Service Product Feature Interface Component SCOPE OF PERSUASION 1 PLACEHOLDER
  12. 12. Service Product Feature Interface Component SCOPE OF PERSUASION 1 PLACEHOLDER
  13. 13. Service Product Feature Interface Component SCOPE OF PERSUASION MMMM Macrosuasion Microsuasion
  14. 14. Service Product Feature Interface Component SCOPE OF PERSUASION MMMM VALUE PROPOSITIONMacrosuasion Microsuasion CONVERSION
  15. 15. Service Product Feature Interface Component SCOPE OF PERSUASION MMMM VALUE PROPOSITIONMacrosuasion Microsuasion CONVERSION
  16. 16. @mattdanna ICASE STUDY Email opt-in Defaults
  17. 17. @mattdanna
  18. 18. @mattdanna ➜ Option 3: Forced opt-in (field is disabled) “You are going to receive our emails but can opt-out later” ➜ Option 1: Unchecked “Would you like to receive our emails?” ➜ Option 2: Pre-checked “We think you should receive our emails.” ➜ Option 4: No UI “Ha! You don’t even know this, but you’re going to get our emails.”
  19. 19. @mattdanna Honest Deceptive ➜ Option 3: Forced opt-in (field is disabled) “You are going to receive our emails but can opt-out later” ➜ Option 1: Unchecked “Would you like to receive our emails?” ➜ Option 2: Pre-checked “We think you should receive our emails.” ➜ Option 4: No UI “Ha! You don’t even know this, but you’re going to get our emails.”
  20. 20. @mattdanna Sample size: 8.5MM Users ‘s Email Opt-in Rate at Sign-up ➜ Before (unchecked) “Send me promotional updates from deviantART” Language (stays the same): 1.6% opt-in
  21. 21. @mattdanna Sample size: 8.5MM Users ‘s Email Opt-in Rate at Sign-up ➜ Before (unchecked) “Send me promotional updates from deviantART” ➜ After (pre-checked) 42.4% opt-in Language (stays the same): 1.6% opt-in
  22. 22. @mattdanna Sample size: 8.5MM Users ‘s Email Opt-in Rate at Sign-up ➜ Before: “Send me promotional updates from deviantART” ➜ After “Email me about the latest deviantART news, contests, and special offers.” 48.5% opt-in 42.4% opt-in
  23. 23. @mattdanna Design Patterns for Microsuasion
  24. 24. @mattdanna Attention Positioning Promotion Presence Prevention
  25. 25. @mattdanna Completion Meter Guidance:
  26. 26. @mattdanna Stepped Process Guidance:
  27. 27. @mattdanna Ongoing Education Guidance:
  28. 28. @mattdanna
  29. 29. @mattdanna Good Defaults Guidance:
  30. 30. @mattdanna Reduction Attention:
  31. 31. @mattdanna Tunneling Attention:
  32. 32. @mattdanna Blocking Attention:
  33. 33. @mattdanna Social Proof Biases:
  34. 34. @mattdanna Testimonials Biases:
  35. 35. @mattdanna Kairos (καιρός) Timing: “Opportune Moment”
  36. 36. @mattdanna Kairos (καιρός) Timing: “Opportune Moment”
  37. 37. @mattdanna Feedback Loop Timing:
  38. 38. @mattdanna Smart Settings Error Proofing:
  39. 39. @mattdanna Conditional Warnings Error Proofing:
  40. 40. @mattdanna Time Limitations Scarcity:
  41. 41. @mattdanna Availability Scarcity:
  42. 42. @mattdanna Exclusivity Scarcity:
  43. 43. @mattdanna Color Theory Visual Design:
  44. 44. @mattdanna Credibility Visual Design:
  45. 45. @mattdanna Calls-to-Action (CTAs) Wordsmithing: "Start your free 30 day trial" vs. "Start my free 30 day trial" "Order Information" vs. "Get Information" "Create Account" vs. "Join Now" etc.
  46. 46. @mattdanna Reaffirmation Recognition:
  47. 47. @mattdanna Badges Recognition:
  48. 48. @mattdanna Fixed Rewards:
  49. 49. @mattdanna Variable Rewards:
  50. 50. @mattdanna Dark Design Patterns for Microsuasion
  51. 51. @mattdanna Presumptuous Greed:
  52. 52. @mattdanna Friction Greed:
  53. 53. @mattdanna Guilt Emotions:
  54. 54. @mattdanna Unexpected Results Inconsistency:
  55. 55. @mattdanna Unexpected Results Inconsistency:
  56. 56. @mattdanna Unexpected Results Inconsistency:
  57. 57. @mattdanna Easy In, 
 Difficult Out Friction:
  58. 58. @mattdanna Easy In, 
 Difficult Out Friction:
  59. 59. @mattdanna All or Nothing Throffer: “Throffer” = Threat + Offer
  60. 60. @mattdanna “Privacy Zuckering” Cognitive Load: Jones, Tim. “Facebook’s “Evil Interfaces””. Electronic Frontier Foundation. 29 April 2010
  61. 61. @mattdanna Forget to cancel rebilling Prey on users laziness…mental recall…forgetfulness
  62. 62. @mattdanna Ethics of Persuasive Technology
  63. 63. @mattdanna “Societies eventually develop antibodies to addictive new things... ...Unless we want to be canaries in the coal mine of each new addiction—the people whose sad example becomes a lesson to future generations—we’ll have to figure out for ourselves what to avoid and how.” –Paul Graham, 2010 The Acceleration of Addictiveness Graham, Paul. paulgraham.com. July 2010
  64. 64. @mattdanna White Hat Black Hat Persuasion ! Transparent ! Upfront about intent ! “Nudging” Manipulation / Coercion ! Deceptive ! Disregards user interest ! “Shoving” Behavior Design
  65. 65. @mattdanna • Your intent, methods of persuasion, and outcomes determine the ethics of your decisions. • You will get the behavior you incent • Be especially careful when it comes to user privacy, online identity, personal identifying information, commerce, and publishing Design with Care
  66. 66. @mattdanna Getting Started with Applying Persuasive Design
  67. 67. @mattdanna Know your users Step 1:
  68. 68. @mattdanna Know your product Step 2:
  69. 69. @mattdanna Functional Usable Persuasive
  70. 70. @mattdanna Determine the behavior you want to drive Step 3:
  71. 71. @mattdanna Put the user in control Step 4:
  72. 72. @mattdanna Make desired 
 outcome align with 
 the user’s interest Step 5:
  73. 73. @mattdanna Market that behavior through education, stories, social norms, gains, surprises, etc. Step 6:
  74. 74. @mattdanna Identify potential losses or negative results to discourage behavior Step 7:
  75. 75. @mattdanna Build the path to the desired outcome and help users through it Step 8:
  76. 76. @mattdanna Keep it simple Step 9:
  77. 77. @mattdanna Experiment, measure, learn, & iterate Step 10:
  78. 78. THX! <3 Discussion / Q&A Matt Danna @mattdanna

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