Thunderstorms

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Thunderstorms

  1. 1. Thunderstorms Image Source: http://www.fema.gov/kids/thphot04.htm
  2. 2. Contents What is a thunderstorm? What are lightning and thunder? What should I do during a thunderstorm? Works Cited Reflection
  3. 3. What is a thunderstorm?Webster’s Dictionary defines a thunderstorm as “a storm accompanied by lightning and thunder.” But what does that mean?FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency) for Kids states that a thunderstorm needs three things to occur: Moisture, Unstable Air (Remember- warm air rises, and in a thunderstorm it rises fast) and Lift, which helps the air raise further.Thunderstorms can be single cell, meaning one isolated storm, or multicell, meaning a group of storms together at different stages. The can also be supercells, which are dangerous for their strong winds. Each cell can last around 20 to 30 minutes.
  4. 4. What is a thunderstorm? Continued. Thunderstorms usually happen in the spring or summer, and form in warm, wet conditions. Did you know? Thunderstorms don’t have to have rain! Sometimes rain will evaporate before it reaches ground level- but theImage source: lightning is still there andhttp://www.fema.gov/kids/thphot01.htm can cause wildfires.
  5. 5. Quiz Time!What three things does a thunderstorm need to occur?Moisture, Unstable Air, and LiftWhy are supercells dangerous?The have strong winds (Fact- this can cause a Tornado!)What conditions do thunderstorms happen in?Warm and Wet.Do thunderstorms have to have rain?No.Good Job! Back to Contents
  6. 6. What are lightning and thunder?Lightning is an electrical discharge of positive and negativecharges in a storm interacting. It can be thought of as a bigversion of a static shock- in fact, that’s exactly what it is!Lightning is actually what causes thunder. When lightinghappens it sets off a sound wave, just like a cannon. Lightwaves can move faster than sound waves, however, which iswhy you see the lighting before you hear the thunder boom.The chances of being struck by lightning is 1 in 600,000. Also,lighting can stick the same place twice, or even more.
  7. 7. What are lightning and thunder? Continued. FEMA for kids explains how to use lighting and thunder to tell how far away a storm is: “You can estimate how many miles away a storm is by counting the number of seconds between the flash of lightning and the clap of thunder. Divide the number of seconds by five to get the distance in miles. The lightning is seen before the thunder is heard because light travelsImage Source: http://www.fema.gov/kids/thphot06.htm faster than sound” (FEMA for Kids).
  8. 8. Quiz Time!What is lighting a result of?Positive and negative charges interacting in a storm.What causes thunder?Lightning.Can lightning strike the same place twice?Yes.What do you divide the number of seconds in betweenlightning and thunder by to get the distance of the storm?Five.Good job! Back to Contents
  9. 9. What should I do during athunderstorm?Thunderstorms are dangerous! Storms can cause lightning,rain, strong winds, hail, flooding, even tornadoes! Whilethunderstorms can be fun to watch it’s important to stay safe.FEMA says: "If thunder roars, go indoors." Being outside isnot safe during a storm. If you are driving, stay in your car andavoid touching any metal. If for some reason you are stuckoutside, get in a ditch and stay low! Lightning is attracted toheight.If someone is ever struck by lightning it is OKAY to touchthem- you will not get shocked. Call 9-1-1 and provide helpimmediately!
  10. 10. What should I do during a thunderstorm? Continued. Indoor safety is important, too! You shouldn’t use a corded phone or be near plumbing (like taking a shower) during a storm, as this can carry a lightning strike to you. Unplug items like computers before the storm starts!Image Source: http://www.fema.gov/kids/thphot03.htm Be on alert- listen to a television or radio for weather information.
  11. 11. Quiz Time!Complete the sentence. “If thunder roars…”“…Go indoors!”Where should you go if you are stuck outside in a thunderstorm?Somewhere low, like a ditch.Is it safe to help someone if they’ve been stuck by lightning?Yes!Why shouldn’t you take a shower during a thunderstorm?Plumbing can conduct a lightning strike.Good Job! Back to Contents
  12. 12. Works CitedFEMA. (2010, August 11). Thunderstorms and lightning. Retrieved fromhttp://www.fema.gov/hazard/thunderstorm/index.shtmFEMA for Kids. (n.d.). Thunderstorms. Retrieved fromhttp://www.fema.gov/kids/thunder.htm (Images also from source)Hatheway, B. (2010, May 27). Thunderstorms. Retrieved fromhttp://www.windows2universe.org/earth/Atmosphere/tstorm.htmlNational Severe Storms Library. (2006, October 15). Thunderstorm basics.Retrieved from http://www.nssl.noaa.gov/primer/tstorm/tst_basics.htmlPalmer, C. (n.d.). A look inside a thunderstorm. USA Today, Retrieved fromhttp://www.usatoday.com/weather/tg/wtsmwhat/wtsmwhat.htmThunderstrom. Merriam-webster. Retrieved January 28, 2011, fromhttp://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/thunderstorm Back to Contents
  13. 13. ReflectionI enjoyed researching this because it reminded me of being a child and watching storms from my bedroom window. I loved learning about weather in school, and I realized why while researching- it’s exciting! There’s all kinds of wild things that can happen in a storm. Lightning is very impressive, especially to a kid.I’ve used PowerPoint in the past, but this is my first time with the new program. I enjoyed exploring it and I found it’s even easier to use and to make things look professional. The interface is much better organized, too.APA citation was hard for me because this is my first time using it- in the past, I’ve only used MLA. I like that it still includes the web url address, unlike MLA; it makes it easier to find the source again. Back to Contents

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