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Indonesia workshop evaluation iwrm 2000 2010-indonesia_sutardi-a_21092011
 

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    Indonesia workshop evaluation iwrm 2000 2010-indonesia_sutardi-a_21092011 Indonesia workshop evaluation iwrm 2000 2010-indonesia_sutardi-a_21092011 Presentation Transcript

    • Workshop on Evaluation of IWRM in SEA 2000-2010
      Country Report on
      Evaluation of IWRM Implementation in
      Indonesia 2000-2010
      Policy, Legal and Institutional Aspects
      Sutardi
      Indonesia Water Partnership
    • Scope of Information Required
      National Overview
      National Water Resources Policy
      National Water Legislation Framework
      Institutional Framework
      Water Resources Status
      Country Investment in Water Resources Develoment and Management (WRDM): 2000 – 2010
      Burning issues, Hot Spots and Critical challenges
      The Way Forward
    • I. National Overviewa. Pertinent statistical data:
      • Location of the country
      lying along equator
      • Area land; Water (%)
      • Administrative regions
      • Population 2000  2010
      • Urban population (%)
      • Population distribution (%)
      • GDP per capita 2010
      • Total No. Island; inhabited
      • Climate
      • Annual raifall
      • N. lat. 6o 02’ & S. lat. 110 5’
      • East long. 940 45’ & 1410 05’
      • 1,919,440 km2 ; water 4.85%
      • 33 prov., 349 districts, 91 cty
      • 207.6 mil.  237.6 mil.
      • 2000: 42% 2010: 44.3%;
      • Java: 60%; Off Java: 40%
      • US $ 3,015
      • 17,508; about 6,000
      • Tropical; wet & dry seasons
      • Low lands: 1,780 - 3,175 mm
      • Mountaneous: up to 6,100mm
      ·     
    • Water Balance by Island
      Year 2020
      Keterangan : * = % thd total nasional
      Home
    • Lampiran - 4
      Water Balance
      By island
      Yr.2020
      Home
    • b. Government System for WRDM
      • New water resources Law enacted since 2004 and its implementing government regulations follow
      • National Water Resources Council exist since 2009. In 2011 the Council issued National WRDM Policy
      • At national level WRDM carried out by Min. Public Works (2 DGs) and other 8 sectoral ministries
      • 5,590 rivers in Indonesia based on management view point are grouped in 133 River Territories (RT’s)
      • 133 RT based on its administrative responsibility further grouped in 13 District RT; 51 Provincial RT; 64 National RT’s (consisting of 27 interprov. RT + 37 RT national strategic), and 5 RT transboundary
      • WRDM of 64 National RTs are carried out by 12 Major River Basin Organizations (Major RBOs) and 19 RBOs
      • WRDM of 51 Provincial RTs, 13 District RTs, and 5 RT transboundaries carried out by 33 Provincial WRDM agencies
    • II. National Water Resources Policy (1)
      Water Resources Management Policy Reform:
      Sector problems:
      • water allocation is under local scarcity due to growth of
      non-irrigation water demand;
      • inadequate urban access to piped water supply;
      • water pollution and adverse impacts of untreated
      municipal wastewater discharge, including industrial and
      mining effluent disposal;
      • adverse impacts of watershed degradation such as
      increasing flood peaks causing economic damages,
      decreasing dry season flow and sedimentation damages
      to water infrastructure;
    • II. National Water Resources Policy (2)
      Water Resources Management Policy Reform:
      b. Policy Amendment in Policy Reform 2000-2010
      • enhance integrated water resources management (IWRM) to achieve sustainable resource use
      • manage water in all aspects -- social, ecological and economic
      • achieve a balance between conservation and water use
      • decentralize the water resources management
      • assure the basic right of water for all people
      • make future policy in a democratic way.
    • II. National Water Resources Policy (3)
      Issuance of Policies related to WRDM:
      • Enactment of the new Water Resource law
      • National Action Plan on MDG’s
      • Implementation of IWRM
      • Climate Variability and Climate Change Anticipation
      i.e., Establishment of National Policy & Strategy
      • Water Resources Development program
      • Water and Sanitation
      • Rural Water supply and Sanitation Action
      • Water for Food and Rural Development
    • II. National Water Resources Policy (4)
      Government Commitment related to WRM:
      List of Declaration in national events:
      • Medium Term National Develoment Plan 2004-2009
      • National Movement on Forest and Land Rehabilitation Program
      • National Partnership Movement for Preservation of Water Resources
    • II. National Water Resources Policy (5)
      Government Commitment related to WRM:
      List of Declaration in regional events:
      • The Second Southeast Asia Water Forum:
      The Bali Ministerial Declaration and Plan of Action
      • The Second Southeast Asia Water Forum:
      The Forum Call for Action
    • II. National Water Resources Policy (6)
      Specific policies related to WRMs Sectors
      • Irrigation
      • Water Supply and sanitation
      • Water Quality
      • River Basin Management
      • Upper Watershed Management and Land Use
      • Flood and Drought Management
      • Decentralization
      • Groundwater
      • Dam construction
      • Water and Industry
      • Water and Energy
      • Water and Transportation
      • Water User Organization
      • Collaboration With External Support
    • III. National Water Legislation Framework (1)
      Comprehensive Water Resources Management Law
      Features of the New Act
      • Management focus
      • Integration/river basin approach
      • Participation
      • Good governance
      • Water as a social and economic good
    • III. National Water Legislation Framework (2)
      Comprehensive Water Resources Management Law
      Content of the new law:
      • Institutional aspect
      • Authority and responsibility
      • Coordination
      • Public consultation
      • Planning
      • Information system
      • Irrigation management policy
      • Water use
      • Conservation
      • Operation and maintenance
      • Flood Control
      • Financial issues
    • III. National Water Legislation Framework (3)
      Specific regulation related to WRM
      • Irrigation
      • Water supply
      • Sanitation  no specific regulation
      • Flood control and management  no specific reg.
      • River basin management
      • Upper watershed and land use  no specific reg.
      • Water quality
      • Groundwater
      • Dam construction
      • Decentralization  no specific reg.
      • Water users organizations  no specific reg.
    • III. National Water Legislation Framework (4)
      Remaining government regulations needed
      • Management of Swamp
      • Management of River
      • Management of Lake
      • Management of Enterprising Water Resource
      • Management of Upper watershed and land use
      • Management of Sanitation
      • Management of Flood
    • IV. Institutional Framework (1)
      1) Institutions involved in WR Management
      A. National level:
      Government:
      • Min. Public Works (2 DGs) & other 8 sectoral minist.
      • National Water Resourcse Council
      • National Board on Climate Change
      Private/State Enterprise Sector:
      • PLN related to hydro-power
      NGO and Academia:
      • PERPAMSI
      • KAI (Ina WP)
      • CK-Net Indonesia
    • IV. Institutional Framework (2)
      Institutions involved in WR Management
      B. Provincial/River Basin level:
      Government:
      • Provincial Water Resources Agency
      • Provincial Water Resourcse Council
      • Coordination Team for WRM of river basin
      • Major River Basin Organization (major RBO) & RBO
      State Enterprise Sector:
      • PJT I (Brantas & B. Solo RTs) and PJT II (Jatiluhur)
      • PDAM related to drinking water
      • PLN related to hydro-power
      NGO and Academia:
      • PERPAMSI (branching)
      • NGO: 31 nos
      • CK-Net Indonesia (has 10 universities as member)
    • IV. Institutional Framework (3)
      Institutions involved in WR Management
      C. Research and Information:
      • CK – Net Indonesia
      • Ministry of Publik Works Research and Development Agency
      D. Human resources, Education and Training:
      • Government’s Human Resources, Education & Training Center
      • Universities’s Human Resources, Education & Training Center
    • IV. Institutional Framework (4)
      Present outstanding institutional issues
      • Regulatory functions and service provision functions of water resources still intermingle.
      • Law enforcement is not functional; the frameworks for water resources management have not yet been legalized.
      • Most human resources in the water resources sector, especially those in the field are not professionals.
      • Conflicts of interest among stakeholders, sectors, administration authority and geographical area (i.e., downstream vs upstream).
      • Strong sectoral and local ego in water resources and other sector related to water
      • Process of formulation of framework for water resources management is considered by some participants as lacking adequate participation of and inputs from stakeholders, etc
    • V. Water Resources Status (1)
      A. Water Resources Conditions:
      1) Watershed and River Condition:
      • Decrease of area of forest resources
      • Degradation of upper watersheds
      • Degradation of coastal ecosystem
      • Mining practice that caused environmental degradation
      Water Quality
      • Upstream: still in good quality to lightly polluted
      • Middlestream: lightly polluted to polluted
      • Downstream: polluted to heavily polluted
    • Watershed and River Condition
      1010
      1010
      1090
      1100
      1100
      1120
      1120
      1130
      1130
      1130
      1130
      1180
      4140
      0
      1180
      4030
      4020
      5090
      5090
      1210
      1240
      7020
      5150
      5150
      5100
      4010
      4010
      1290
      5160
      5160
      1260
      1260
      2010
      2010
      2020
      2020
      5170
      5170
      2040
      2040
      2050
      2050
      2100
      2100
      2080
      2080
      2120
      2120
      3010
      2130
      2130
      2140
      2140
      2090
      2090
      2070
      2110
      Increase of critical lands (13,1 mil. Ha in 1992, now (2010) already > 18,5 mil Ha).
      Increase distribution of critical RCA (22 RCAs in 1984, 39 RCAs in 1992, become 62 RCAs in 2005).
      1984 ---22 Critical RCA
      1992 --- 39 Critical RCA
      2005 --- 62 Critical RCA
    • STATUS OF WATER QUALITYIN SOME RIVERDI INDONESIA
      LP = ligthly polluted; PL = polluted; HP= highly polluted; Good = not yet polluted
    • V. Water Resources Status (2)
      Water Resources Conditions:
      Floods and droughts:
      • Increase the frequency & intensity of floods occurence
      • Increase of areas affected by floods and droughts
      • Increase of number of human casualty and people to be evacuated
      • Increase number of economic losses in private & public propty
      4) Impact of Climate Change (current impacts)
      • Increase of the number of occurence of extreem climate event
      • Rise of sea water level in some location
      • Decrease of certain fruits production, ie., coffee, manggo, etc
    • Watershed and River Condition
      Impact of Floods and Droughts
      Decrease of rice production due to floods (about374,000 ha/yrorequal to919,000 ton rice/yr) ordue to droughts (about350,000 ha/yror equal to700,000 ton rice/yr).
      Urban floods also caused significant economic lossess due decrease of productivity of service and industrial areas and traffic jams
    • Watershed and River Condition
      Impact of Climate Change
      Impact of the rise of sea water level due to global warming:
      • This will directly affect to socio-economic life of about 16 milion peoples in10.666 villages in coastal areas.
      • More productive areas in coastal area will flooded and this will be occured more frequently and in incrasing intensity.
      • Erotion and abration of of coastal areas will spread over.
      • Retreat of coastal line.
    • V. Water Resources Status (3)
      Water Demand, Water Use & WR Development:
      Water for DMI
      Water for food
      Flood management
      Sanitation
      Hydropower
      Navigation
      Fishery, tourism and recreation
      Climate Change Adaption
      Demand management
    • V. Water Resources Status (4)
      Water Resources Potential and Demands in 2020
      Unit: MCM
    • V. Water Resources Status (5)
      Plan to achieve MDGs in 2015
      Proportion of house hold having access to a safe and clean water in 2009 47.71% to be increased in 2015 68.87%
    • V. Water Resources Status (6)
      Water Demand, Water Use & WR Development:
      8) Climate Change Adaption
      Strategy adaptation to climate change:
      • To increase capacity of management of water resources infrastructures to support food security program
      • To develop disaster risk management for floods and landslides
      • To increase communities consciousness
    • V. Water Resources Status (7)
      Water Demand, Water Use & WR Development:
      Climate Change Adaption
      Short Term Adaption Programs (2008-2014):
      • Construction and management and rehabilitation large scale dam and reservoirs to avoid river discharge fluctuation.
      • Construction, management and rehabilitation of irrigation networks to secure food security for the nation.
      • Development of new technology for irrigation to support rice intensifitation program and to reduce water use for agriculture (for example, drip and spray irrigation system)
      • Preparing a data base on water balance on critical rivers to access future water avaibility considering the existence of climate change.
      • Construction and maintenance sea water protection facilities to prevent abrasion, and coastal erosion and also sea water intrusion.
      • Construction and maintenance of flood control management to protect cities and districts that are susceptible to floods and other water related disasters .
      • Carry out capacity building in disaster risk management by training and education.
      • Preparing early warning system to anticipate water related disasters
      • Preparing a data base to access level of susceptibility of a certain area to disasters related to the impact of climate change
      • Carry out water conservation campaign through the existing partnership movement, i.e., National Partnership Movement for Preservation of Water Resource
    • VI. Country Investment in WRDM 2000-2010
      Sources of funds for investment:
      • Sources of funds: more than 70% from government, the rest is from loans (World Bank, ADB, JBIC/JICA, IDB, etc) and grant
      B. Major water resources project:
      • Completed between 2000-2010
      • Presently on-going and in pipeline
      • New proposal (2010-2014)
      • Aggregated achievement of project completed in 2005-2009
      Annual expenditure
      • Water resources
      • Irrigation
      • Raw Water Supply
      • Flood control and management
      D. Return on Investment
    • RESULTOFWATER RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT (2009)
      • 5.7million Ha technical irrigation systems and 1.6 million Ha village irrigation systems,
      • 2,200 MW of hydropower generation ( 6 % nation capacity),
      • Urban and Rural water supply systems of 100,000 l/sec,
      • Reclamation of 3.3 million ha of swampland,
      • More than 18,000 ha of fishponds,
      • 1.96 million ha of flood protected lowland & urban area,
      • More than 100 kilometers of coastal protection.
      ·     
    • VII. Burning Issue, Hot Spots & Critical Challenges
      Most serius threats to water security:
      • Enabling environment; Institutional Frameworks; Management Ins.
      Critical hot spot areas related to water security
      • Java, Bali, and Nusa Tenggara
      Most serious demand for change of governance
      • Water resources
      • Irrigation
      • Water Supply
      • Flood control and management
      • Navigation
      • Hydro-power
    • VIII. The Way Forward
      National Policy on Water Resources Management
      • Important features of the National Policy for WRM
      • Comment and recomendation on the National Policy
      The National Roadmap for implementation of IWRM
      • Enabling environment
      • Institutional Framework
      • Management Instrument
    • Thank You