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Impressionism
Impressionism
Impressionism
Impressionism
Impressionism
Impressionism
Impressionism
Impressionism
Impressionism
Impressionism
Impressionism
Impressionism
Impressionism
Impressionism
Impressionism
Impressionism
Impressionism
Impressionism
Impressionism
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Impressionism

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  • 1. Impressionism Europe and America, 1870 to 1900Gardner‟s Art Through the Ages, 13e, Chapter 31 1
  • 2. Industrialization of Europe and U.S. about 1850 2
  • 3. Goals• Understand why the Industrial Revolution, Darwinism, Marxism and sociopolitical changes altered ideas about the nature and subject matter of art in the later 19th century.• Examine the meanings of “Modernism” and “Realism” philosophically and in the appearance of art and architecture.• Understand the formal and content issues of the Impressionists.• Examine experiments in materials and form in art at the turn of the century. 3
  • 4. Impressionism• Understand the formal elements and subject choices of the Impressionist artists.• Examine the Impressionists‟ interest in sensation, impermanence, and the “fleeting moment” as it was expressed in their art.• Understand the importance of light and color theory in the work of the Impressionists.• Recognize representative Impressionist artists and works. 4
  • 5. CLAUDE MONET, Impression: Sunrise, 1872. Oil on canvas, 1‟ 7 1/2” x 2‟ 1 1/2”. Musée Marmottan, Paris. 5
  • 6. CLAUDE MONET, Rouen Cathedral: The Portal (in Sun),1894. Oil on canvas, 3‟ 3 1/4” x 2‟ 1 7/8”. MetropolitanMuseum of Art, New York (Theodore M. Davis Collection,bequest of Theodore M. Davis, 1915). 6
  • 7. CLAUDE MONET, Saint-Lazare Train Station, 1877. Oil on canvas, 2‟ 5 3/4” x 3‟ 5”. Musée d‟Orsay, Paris. 7
  • 8. GUSTAVE CAILLEBOTTE, Paris: A Rainy Day, 1877. Oil on canvas, 6‟ 9” x 9‟ 9”. The Art Institute of Chicago,Chicago, (Worcester Fund). 8
  • 9. CAMILLE PISSARRO, La Place du Théâtre Français, 1898. Oil on canvas, 2‟ 4 1/2” x 3‟ 1/2”. Los Angeles County Museumof Art, Los Angeles (the Mr. and Mrs. George Gard De Sylva Collection). 9
  • 10. PIERRE-AUGUSTE RENOIR, Le Moulin de la Galette, 1876. Oil on canvas, 4‟ 3” x 5‟ 8”. Musée d‟Orsay, Paris. 10
  • 11. ÉDOUARD MANET, Bar at the Folies-Bergère, 1882. Oil on canvas, 3‟ 1” x 4‟ 3”. Courtauld Institute of Art Gallery, London. 11
  • 12. EDGAR DEGAS, Ballet Rehearsal, 1874. Oil on canvas, 1‟ 11” x 2‟ 9”. Glasgow Art Galleries and Museum, Glasgow 12
  • 13. BERTHE MORISOT, Villa at the Seaside, 1874. Oil on canvas, 1‟ 7 3/4” x 2‟ 1/8". Norton Simon Art Foundation, Los Angeles. 13
  • 14. Japonisme and Later Impressionism• Examine issues of other Impressionist, such as the influence of the Japanese print and concerns with formal elements. 14
  • 15. Left: EDGAR DEGAS, The Tub, 1886. Pastel, 1‟ 11 ½” X 2‟ 8 3/8”. Musee d‟Orsay, Paris.Right: TORII KIYONAGA, detail of Two Women at the Bath, ca. 1780. Color woodblock,full print 10 ½” X 7 ½”, detail 3 ¾” X 3 ½”. Musee Guimet, Paris. 15
  • 16. MARY CASSATT, The Bath, ca. 1892. Oil on canvas,3‟ 3” x 2‟ 2”. The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago(Robert A. Walker Fund). 16
  • 17. JAMES ABBOTT MCNEILL WHISTLER,Nocturne in Black and Gold (The Falling Rocket),ca. 1875. Oil on panel, 1‟ 11 5/8” x 1‟ 6 1/2”.Detroit Institute of Arts, Detroit(gift of Dexter M. Ferry Jr.). 17
  • 18. HENRI DE TOULOUSE-LAUTREC, At the Moulin Rouge, 1892–1895. Oil on canvas, 4‟ x 4‟ 7”. Art Institute of Chicago,Chicago (Helen Birch Bartlett Memorial Collection). 18
  • 19. Discussion Questions In what ways did the Modernist art of the later 19th century break from the past? Why did the public find the subjects, forms, and techniques of the Impressionists shocking? How did Modernist artists call attention to the „facts‟ of art making? 19

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