The Components of Art Subject, Style, Content, Form, Media and Technique 0
The duty of an artist is  to strain against the bonds  of the existing style.    – Philip Johnson 0
Subject Matter   <ul><li>The main theme of a work of art. </li></ul><ul><li>The person, place, thing, or abstract idea sel...
<ul><li>Awareness of style, form, and content  </li></ul><ul><li>helps the viewer understand and appreciate the visual art...
ICONOGRAPHY <ul><li>Iconography  - the study of subject matter and symbolism.   </li></ul><ul><li>Awareness of symbolism c...
STYLE <ul><li>The characteristic manner of executing the visual elements used by an artist. </li></ul><ul><li>The distinct...
<ul><li>Historical context  is the record of events that affected the artist and the development of his/her work.  </li></...
<ul><li>Variations in style are sometimes linked to cultural contexts. </li></ul><ul><li>Period style  is the general char...
Running Horse ,  Cave Painting,  Lascaux, France Period Style
Christ as the Good Shepherd , Byzantine Mosaic,  Mausoleum of Gala Placidia, Ravenna, Italy Regional Style
Claude Monet,  Impression Sunset ,  Impressionism,  oil on canvas Regional Style
VAN GOGH .    Starry Night  (c.  1890 )   oil on canvas Individual Style
Art, Culture, and Context <ul><li>The work of most artists is a product of their culture and time.  </li></ul><ul><li>Ther...
<ul><li>Provenance  is the source and history of a work of art. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Artist biographical information </li...
Content <ul><li>Content  is the meaning of a work of art.   </li></ul><ul><li>The content of a work of art not only refers...
The Levels of Content in a Work of Art <ul><li>Three levels of content: </li></ul><ul><li>Subject Matter </li></ul><ul><li...
Amorous Couple  (Mayan, Late Classic, 700–900 CE). Polychromed ceramic. H: 9   3⁄4 ” .
CONSTANTINE BRANCUSI .  The Kiss   ( c. 19 12 ).  limestone .
OSCAR KOKOSCHKA .     The Tempest   ( c. 19 14 ).   Oil on canvas
GRANT WOOD.  American Gothic  (1930). Oil on beaverboard. 29   7⁄8 ” x  24   7⁄8 ” .
BARBARA HEPWORTH (1903–1975).  Two Figures (Menhirs)  (1954–1955). Teak. H: 54 ” .
ROY LICHTENSTEIN.  Forget It, Forget Me!  (1962). Magna and oil on canvas. 79   7⁄8 ” x  68 ” .
DONNA ROSENTHAL.  He Said… She Said;”let’s get physical”-”Do you think I’m Sexy”  (1999).  Mixed media. Suit 12” x 12” x 1...
Realistic Art <ul><li>Realism  is the portrayal of people and things as they are seen by the eye or as they are thought to...
Realistic Art <ul><li>ROMAN ART.  Cato the Elder,  (c.500 BC) </li></ul>
REALISM   <ul><li>Represents reality </li></ul><ul><li>Records an artist’s own experiences. </li></ul><ul><li>Gustave Cour...
Photography <ul><li>WALTER LUBKEN.  The Hancock Homestead,  (c.1910) </li></ul><ul><li>We think of photography as the most...
Realistic vs Representational Art <ul><li>Representational art  presents natural  forms in a recognizable manner, although...
Representational GOYA  Third of May, 1808    Romanticism   oil on canvas
Expressionistic Art <ul><li>In expressionistic art, form and color are freely distorted by the artist in order to achieve ...
OSCAR KOKOSCHKA .     The Tempest   ( c. 19 14 ).   Oil on canvas Expressionism
Abstraction <ul><li>Abstract  - art that departs significantly from the actual appearance of things; modification </li></u...
Abstraction PABLO PICASSO,  Les Demoiselles D’Avignon  (c. 1906)  oil on canvas
“ Copy nature and you infringe on the work of our lord.  Interpret nature and you are an artist.  “   - JACQUE LIPCHITZ
BARBARA HEPWORTH (1903–1975).  Two Figures (Menhirs)  (1954–1955). Teak. H: 54 ” .
Nonobjective <ul><li>Nonobjective  - art that makes no reference to nature or reality. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Psychic Autom...
Nonobjective - Psychic Automation  <ul><li>JACKSON POLLOCK,   Lavender Mist  (c. 1950)  Abstract Expressionism </li></ul>
JUDY PFAFF.  Voodoo  (1981). Contact paper collage on Mylar. 98 ” x  60 ”  (framed).
Content <ul><li>Content  is the meaning of a work of art.   </li></ul><ul><li>The content of a work of art not only refers...
The Levels of Content in a Work of Art <ul><li>Three levels of content: </li></ul><ul><li>Subject Matter </li></ul><ul><li...
<ul><li>Subject </li></ul><ul><li>Color </li></ul><ul><li>Texture </li></ul><ul><li>Space </li></ul><ul><li>Balance </li><...
 
 
JACQUES-LOUIS DAVID.  Death of Marat  (1793). Oil on canvas. 63   3⁄4 ” x  49   1⁄8 ” . SANDOW BIRK.  Death of Manuel  (19...
JACQUES - LOUIS DAVID.  The Oath of the Horatii  (1784). Oil on canvas. 11 ’ x  14 ’ .
FORM <ul><li>The form of a work refers to its totality as a work of art. </li></ul><ul><li>The organization of the element...
<ul><li>Formalistic criticism  is an approach that concentrates on the formal concepts such as the elements and principles...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

The Components of Art

23,205 views
22,804 views

Published on

A Look at Subject Matter, Style, Form, and Content

Published in: Education
0 Comments
19 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
23,205
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
19
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Cave Painting, Paleolithic Art, Prehistoric Art, Ancient Art
  • Byzantine Art
  • Impressionism, Paris, France
  • Post-Impressionism, Pre-Expressionism, Abstraction
  • Theme: Couples in Art
  • What does it mean when we refer to works of art being &amp;quot;representational&amp;quot;? *They resemble things in the real world
  • Action Painting
  • In the Arnolfini Wedding Portrait, - the dog represents fidelity
  • - the touching of hands represents an agreement to wed
  • - the convex mirror represents a distorted reflection from the back with the artist in the background. It is surrounded by smaller images of the passion of Christ.
  • Many artists reference early art in their form.
  • Art can be read on many levels. Knowing the back story helps to understand the content and symbolism.
  • The Components of Art

    1. 1. The Components of Art Subject, Style, Content, Form, Media and Technique 0
    2. 2. The duty of an artist is to strain against the bonds of the existing style. – Philip Johnson 0
    3. 3. Subject Matter <ul><li>The main theme of a work of art. </li></ul><ul><li>The person, place, thing, or abstract idea selected by the artist. </li></ul>0
    4. 4. <ul><li>Awareness of style, form, and content </li></ul><ul><li>helps the viewer understand and appreciate the visual arts more fully. </li></ul>0
    5. 5. ICONOGRAPHY <ul><li>Iconography - the study of subject matter and symbolism. </li></ul><ul><li>Awareness of symbolism can enrich the viewing experience. </li></ul>
    6. 6. STYLE <ul><li>The characteristic manner of executing the visual elements used by an artist. </li></ul><ul><li>The distinctive handling of the elements and media associated with the work of an individual artist, a school or movement, or specific culture or time period. </li></ul>0
    7. 7. <ul><li>Historical context is the record of events that affected the artist and the development of his/her work. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>political, social, economic, scientific, technological, and intellectual background </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ex.; Fall of Rome, Coming of Christianity, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Barbarians Invasions, Industrial Revolution, WW II, 9/11 </li></ul></ul>Art, Culture, and Context “Context has a profound influence on style.”
    8. 8. <ul><li>Variations in style are sometimes linked to cultural contexts. </li></ul><ul><li>Period style is the general characteristics common to much of the work from given period of time or cultural phase. </li></ul><ul><li>Regional style is the manner of expression common in the work of artists working in the same country or area. </li></ul><ul><li>Individual style is the manner of expression used by a particular artist. </li></ul>
    9. 9. Running Horse , Cave Painting, Lascaux, France Period Style
    10. 10. Christ as the Good Shepherd , Byzantine Mosaic, Mausoleum of Gala Placidia, Ravenna, Italy Regional Style
    11. 11. Claude Monet, Impression Sunset , Impressionism, oil on canvas Regional Style
    12. 12. VAN GOGH . Starry Night (c. 1890 ) oil on canvas Individual Style
    13. 13. Art, Culture, and Context <ul><li>The work of most artists is a product of their culture and time. </li></ul><ul><li>There are many styles in art, they change often, and yet there are some standards. </li></ul><ul><li>One of the best ways to illustrate stylistic differences is to examine a group of artworks with a common subject, such as the “couple” </li></ul>
    14. 14. <ul><li>Provenance is the source and history of a work of art. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Artist biographical information </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>When and where was it made? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How was it made? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Where was it exhibited? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Who bought it? For how much? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Where is it now? </li></ul></ul>Provenance
    15. 15. Content <ul><li>Content is the meaning of a work of art. </li></ul><ul><li>The content of a work of art not only refers its subject matter and its underlining meanings or themes. </li></ul>
    16. 16. The Levels of Content in a Work of Art <ul><li>Three levels of content: </li></ul><ul><li>Subject Matter </li></ul><ul><li>Elements and composition </li></ul><ul><li>Underlying or symbolic meanings or themes </li></ul>
    17. 17. Amorous Couple (Mayan, Late Classic, 700–900 CE). Polychromed ceramic. H: 9 3⁄4 ” .
    18. 18. CONSTANTINE BRANCUSI . The Kiss ( c. 19 12 ). limestone .
    19. 19. OSCAR KOKOSCHKA . The Tempest ( c. 19 14 ). Oil on canvas
    20. 20. GRANT WOOD. American Gothic (1930). Oil on beaverboard. 29 7⁄8 ” x 24 7⁄8 ” .
    21. 21. BARBARA HEPWORTH (1903–1975). Two Figures (Menhirs) (1954–1955). Teak. H: 54 ” .
    22. 22. ROY LICHTENSTEIN. Forget It, Forget Me! (1962). Magna and oil on canvas. 79 7⁄8 ” x 68 ” .
    23. 23. DONNA ROSENTHAL. He Said… She Said;”let’s get physical”-”Do you think I’m Sexy” (1999). Mixed media. Suit 12” x 12” x 1 1/2”; dress 10” x 8” x 8”.
    24. 24. Realistic Art <ul><li>Realism is the portrayal of people and things as they are seen by the eye or as they are thought to be without idealization, without distortion. </li></ul><ul><li>Realism , also, defines a specific school of art that developed during the mid-nineteenth century in France. </li></ul>
    25. 25. Realistic Art <ul><li>ROMAN ART. Cato the Elder, (c.500 BC) </li></ul>
    26. 26. REALISM <ul><li>Represents reality </li></ul><ul><li>Records an artist’s own experiences. </li></ul><ul><li>Gustave Courbet Burial at Ornans, oil on canvas </li></ul>
    27. 27. Photography <ul><li>WALTER LUBKEN. The Hancock Homestead, (c.1910) </li></ul><ul><li>We think of photography as the most realistic. The technique of shooting, capturing, and documenting suggests candid truth and reality. </li></ul>
    28. 28. Realistic vs Representational Art <ul><li>Representational art presents natural forms in a recognizable manner, although not always in realistic way. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Naturalistic </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Realistic </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Stylistic </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Expressionistic </li></ul></ul>
    29. 29. Representational GOYA Third of May, 1808 Romanticism oil on canvas
    30. 30. Expressionistic Art <ul><li>In expressionistic art, form and color are freely distorted by the artist in order to achieve a heightened emotional impact </li></ul><ul><li>Expressionistic is, also, a modern art movement. </li></ul>
    31. 31. OSCAR KOKOSCHKA . The Tempest ( c. 19 14 ). Oil on canvas Expressionism
    32. 32. Abstraction <ul><li>Abstract - art that departs significantly from the actual appearance of things; modification </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Cubism - transcribed natural forms into largely angular geometric equivalents. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Simplification </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Distortion </li></ul></ul>
    33. 33. Abstraction PABLO PICASSO, Les Demoiselles D’Avignon (c. 1906) oil on canvas
    34. 34. “ Copy nature and you infringe on the work of our lord. Interpret nature and you are an artist. “ - JACQUE LIPCHITZ
    35. 35. BARBARA HEPWORTH (1903–1975). Two Figures (Menhirs) (1954–1955). Teak. H: 54 ” .
    36. 36. Nonobjective <ul><li>Nonobjective - art that makes no reference to nature or reality. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Psychic Automation - when an artist attempts to clear their mind of purpose and concerns so that inner conflicts and ideas find expression through their works. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>- Abstract Expressionism - Action Painting; a record of the action of painting </li></ul></ul>
    37. 37. Nonobjective - Psychic Automation <ul><li>JACKSON POLLOCK, Lavender Mist (c. 1950) Abstract Expressionism </li></ul>
    38. 38. JUDY PFAFF. Voodoo (1981). Contact paper collage on Mylar. 98 ” x 60 ” (framed).
    39. 39. Content <ul><li>Content is the meaning of a work of art. </li></ul><ul><li>The content of a work of art not only refers its subject matter and its underlining meanings or themes. </li></ul>
    40. 40. The Levels of Content in a Work of Art <ul><li>Three levels of content: </li></ul><ul><li>Subject Matter </li></ul><ul><li>Elements and composition </li></ul><ul><li>Underlying or symbolic meanings or themes </li></ul>
    41. 41. <ul><li>Subject </li></ul><ul><li>Color </li></ul><ul><li>Texture </li></ul><ul><li>Space </li></ul><ul><li>Balance </li></ul><ul><li>Symbolism </li></ul><ul><ul><li>the touching of hands represents an agreement to wed. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>the dog represents fidelity. </li></ul></ul>Looking at Art Jan Van Eyck, Giovanni Arnolfini and His Bride, 1434 oil paint
    42. 44. JACQUES-LOUIS DAVID. Death of Marat (1793). Oil on canvas. 63 3⁄4 ” x 49 1⁄8 ” . SANDOW BIRK. Death of Manuel (1992). Oil on canvas. 33 ” x 25 ” .
    43. 45. JACQUES - LOUIS DAVID. The Oath of the Horatii (1784). Oil on canvas. 11 ’ x 14 ’ .
    44. 46. FORM <ul><li>The form of a work refers to its totality as a work of art. </li></ul><ul><li>The organization of the elements including the design principles and composition of a work of art. </li></ul>
    45. 47. <ul><li>Formalistic criticism is an approach that concentrates on the formal concepts such as the elements and principles, but not content, historical context or the biography of the artist. </li></ul>

    ×