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POC_Ch15
 

POC_Ch15

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    POC_Ch15 POC_Ch15 Presentation Transcript

    • “To read without reflecting is like15 eating without digesting.” ― Edmund Burke, 18th century Irish statesman and philosopherReading with a Purpose
    • After completing the chapter, you will be able to:• Describe the importance of reading skills.• Apply techniques that will enable you to master the skill of active reading.• Use specific reading approaches that contribute to productive use of reading materials.• Explain general reading techniques.• Describe tips that will help you improve your reading skills. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
    • Reading Is a Skill • Active reading involves concentration. – consider writer’s purpose for writing – consider your purpose for reading – relate what you read to prior knowledge – evaluate material as you read and after you read to make sure you understand • To actively read, you must: – be involved – do something in response © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
    • Reading Is a Skill • When you read skillfully, you – get meaning from written words and symbols – evaluate the accuracy and validity of the words and symbols Shutterstock © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
    • 1. What occurs when you read skillfully?2. What two things are required in active reading? © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
    • Active Reading • Consider the writer’s purpose for writing. • Consider your purpose for reading. • Relate what you read to your prior knowledge. • Evaluate reading material as you read and after you read to ensure understanding. Shutterstock © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
    • Active Reading • Consider the writer’s purpose – Who is the writer? – What is the writer’s purpose? – Does the writer expect something from me? If so, what is it? – Is the writer trying to persuade me to do something? If so, what? – Does the writer have a bias regarding the subject? If so, how might that have influenced what was written? © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
    • Active Reading • Consider your purpose for reading. – Read for information. • Skim to find the portion of the document that is likely to contain the information. • Scan to locate the specific piece of information. • Read for detail after you find the information you are looking for. • Look for boilerplate information, which is standard language or wording. – Read to follow directions. – Read persuasive writing. • Do not presume, or believe on assumed reliability © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
    • Active Reading • Use prior knowledge. – What do I already know about the writer? – What do I already know about the situation? – What do I already know about this subject in general? – Did I request this information? – Have I said or done something recently that prompted this information? – Am I receiving this information because it relates to my job? How does it relate? – How can I use this information? © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
    • Active Reading • Evaluate what you read. – Do the facts support what I already know or have heard, read, or seen elsewhere about this topic? – Do the facts support the writer’s conclusions? – Do I accept what the writer is saying or do I need to find another source? – Does the writer’s tone match the words? – Are there unwritten messages here that I should think about? – Are there questions I need to have answered before I act? © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
    • 1. What are four things you must do when actively reading?2. What is boilerplate material? (continued) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
    • 3. What is a presumption? © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
    • Reading Approaches • Skimming means to quickly glance through an entire document. • Tips for skimming reports, proposals, brochures, articles, and online information: – Read the title. – Skim section titles and headings; use the table of contents if there is one. – Flip through pages, spending no more than 10 to 15 seconds on each page. – Look at graphics and illustrations; skim the captions. – Read the headings and note sections that are boxed, bulleted, numbered, or set in different typefaces. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
    • Reading Approaches • Tips for skimming e-mails and letters: – In e-mails, the SUBJECT line should tell you the purpose of the message. – Check the letterhead or e-mail address to see if you know the company. – Check the signature block to see if you know the writer. – Check to see if others were copied on the e-mail or letter. – Check for attachments. – Skim the body of the message. – Look for words or phrases that are underlined, italicized, boldfaced, or in a bulleted or numbered list. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
    • Reading Approaches • Scanning means to quickly glance through a message to find something specific. • Scan for specific information. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
    • Tips for Scanning • Identify as specifically as possible the information you must find. • Determine clues or characteristics that will help you locate the information. • Look briefly each time you see an item with characteristics that match your search to see if it is what you need. If it is not, continue scanning. • If necessary to determine whether you found the exact information you are looking for, you may have to quickly read surrounding material. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
    • Reading Approaches • Reading for detail is reading all phrases and words, considering the meaning, and determining how they combine with other elements to convey ideas. • Reading for detail is what most people think of when they hear “reading.” © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
    • Tips for Reading for Detail • Anticipate content and the purpose for reading based on prior knowledge. • Be aware of the purpose for reading. • Read word by word or phrase by phrase, connecting concepts to form larger concepts. • Question and comment on the writer’s statements, while checking your understanding and comprehension of the material. • Reread until you understand or read ahead to see if later text provides clarity. (continued) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
    • Tips for Reading for Detail • If you get stuck on words or concepts, use prior knowledge to work through the problem areas or seek help from a coworker or reference materials. • When you finish your detailed reading, evaluate what you have read considering the purpose and analyze. • Draw conclusions about the reading based on the purpose and situation, putting biases and emotions aside. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
    • 1. What are the three approaches to reading?2. What is the difference between skimming and scanning?3. What is the type of reading most people think of when they hear the word reading? © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
    • General Reading Techniques • Prioritize your reading. – read now if important to your job duties and current priorities, read as soon as possible – read later if you do not have to read today – file if you do not need now, discard if you will never need © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
    • General Reading Techniques • Mark reading materials. – write notes in the margins – highlight or underline important text – attach self-stick notes to important pages – attach self-stick tabs to mark pages you will use repeatedly Shutterstock © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
    • General Reading Techniques • Read phrases, not words. • Build your vocabulary. – Look up words you do not understand. • Control your reading environment. • Be ready to read. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
    • 1. What are the three groups for prioritizing reading material?2. What is the best way to improve your vocabulary? © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
    • Improving Your Reading Skills • Two of the most important things are reading more and using a dictionary. – Time yourself. – Pay attention to how often you are interrupted. – Assess your reading environment. – Pay attention to your thoughts as you read. – Consider using different reading approaches for different kinds of reading. – Try to recognize whether you read word by word or phrase by phrase. – Keep track of the number of times you read a page and find that you do not really know what you just read. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
    • Improving Your Reading Skills • If you feel that you need professional help, take a class. – reading comprehension – time management © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
    • 1. What are the two best ways to improve your reading skills?2. What are two classes that may help improve your reading skills? © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
    • • Active reading involves concentration; you must be involved and do something in response to the words.• Consider writer’s purpose, your purpose, use prior knowledge, and evaluate the material.• The three basic approaches to reading are skimming, scanning, and reading for detail.• Prioritize your reading.• Reading more and using a dictionary are the surest way to improve your reading skills. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.