“I like to listen. I have learned a14          great deal from listening carefully.          Most people never listen.”   ...
After completing the chapter, you will be able to:• Differentiate between hearing and listening.• Identify the criteria fo...
Listening Is a Skill • Hearing is a physical process    – sound waves reach your ears    – your ears send signals to your ...
Listening Is a Skill • Types of listening    – Passive listening is casually listening to the speaker.    – Active listeni...
Listening Is a Skill • Active listening    – listening for specific information       • identify your purpose and adapt yo...
Listening Is a Skill • Actively listening to requests    – be sure you understand the      what, where, when, why, and how...
Listening Is a Skill • Actively listening to directions    – use prior knowledge—experience and information      you alrea...
Listening Is a Skill • Listening to persuasive talk    – What is in it for the speaker?    – Whom does the speaker represe...
Listening Is a Skill • Identifying types of active listening    – Informative—need to learn specific information or      i...
1. What is the difference between hearing and   listening?2. What is the difference between passive listening   and active...
Becoming an Active Listener • Recognize the speaker’s purpose. Listen for   bias, which is a prejudice. • Use prior knowle...
Tips for EvaluatingWhat You Hear • Do the speaker’s facts support what you have heard,   read, or seen from other sources?...
Tips for EvaluatingWhat You Hear • Once you begin evaluating what you hear by relating   old information to new, your eval...
Tips for EvaluatingWhat You Hear  – You check your own understanding.Oh, I get it. To speed up the approval process, from ...
1. What is bias?2. How can skepticism be useful to the listening   process?                                               ...
3. What can be used in addition to the words to   understand the meaning of a message?                        © Goodheart-...
Active Listening inFormal Situations • Indicate you are paying attention.    – show attention    – take notes; only on wha...
Active Listening inFormal Situations   – Avoid noting information that appears in a handout.     Highlight or put a check ...
Active Listening inFormal Situations • Give feedback    – friendly questions, not unfriendly questions    – make comments ...
Active Listening inFormal Situations • Do not ask unfriendly questions.                          © Goodheart-Willcox Co., ...
Active Listening inFormal Situations • Fight distractions and barriers    –   Barriers are internal or external.    –   Fi...
1. In face-to-face communication, how can you   indicate you are paying attention without saying   anything?2. When taking...
3. What are the two best ways of providing   feedback?4. What are the two ways to classify barriers to   listening?       ...
• Hearing is the physical process of sound  waves being processed by the brain.• You can become an active listener with  p...
POC_Ch14
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POC_Ch14

  1. 1. “I like to listen. I have learned a14 great deal from listening carefully. Most people never listen.” ― Ernest Hemingway, American author and winner of the Nobel Prize in LiteratureListening with a Purpose
  2. 2. After completing the chapter, you will be able to:• Differentiate between hearing and listening.• Identify the criteria for becoming an active listener.• Demonstrate how to apply active listening in formal situations. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  3. 3. Listening Is a Skill • Hearing is a physical process – sound waves reach your ears – your ears send signals to your brain • Listening is an intellectual process – listening combines hearing with evaluating © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  4. 4. Listening Is a Skill • Types of listening – Passive listening is casually listening to the speaker. – Active listening is fully participating as you process what other people say. Shutterstock © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  5. 5. Listening Is a Skill • Active listening – listening for specific information • identify your purpose and adapt your listening behavior accordingly • prepare in advance and decide what information you hope to take away with you • ask questions and prepare for – a complex response (one that is hard to understand) – an evasive response (one that avoids giving you a direct answer) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  6. 6. Listening Is a Skill • Actively listening to requests – be sure you understand the what, where, when, why, and how – ask follow-up questions to clarify – make comments that summarize what you are asked to do – take notes for details – summarize and write or think through all of the main points you just heard © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  7. 7. Listening Is a Skill • Actively listening to directions – use prior knowledge—experience and information you already possess—to relate your new knowledge you will receive – evaluate and summarize your notes – ask follow-up questions – give feedback © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  8. 8. Listening Is a Skill • Listening to persuasive talk – What is in it for the speaker? – Whom does the speaker represent? – What does the speaker want you to do or believe? • statements may be literal (speaker means exactly what is said) • statements may inferential (you draw a conclusion from what is said) – What are the pros and cons on this issue? © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  9. 9. Listening Is a Skill • Identifying types of active listening – Informative—need to learn specific information or instructions – Evaluative listening—need to determine the quality or validity of what is being said – Empathetic listening—attempt to put yourself in the speaker’s place and understand how he or she feels – Reflective listening—consider what the speaker says; all active listening involves reflective listening © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  10. 10. 1. What is the difference between hearing and listening?2. What is the difference between passive listening and active listening? © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  11. 11. Becoming an Active Listener • Recognize the speaker’s purpose. Listen for bias, which is a prejudice. • Use prior knowledge. Be aware of skepticism, which means you have a degree of doubt. – can be beneficial so you do not take things on faith • Evaluate what you hear. • Note body language and other nonverbal cues, which can also help understand the meaning of the message. • Consider personality of speaker. • Evaluate the message. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  12. 12. Tips for EvaluatingWhat You Hear • Do the speaker’s facts support what you have heard, read, or seen from other sources? • Do the speaker’s facts agree with or contradict facts earlier presented by the same speaker? • Do the speaker’s conclusions agree with your experience? • Do the speaker’s suggestions and recommendations have substance? • Does the speaker meet the test of common sense? (continued) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  13. 13. Tips for EvaluatingWhat You Hear • Once you begin evaluating what you hear by relating old information to new, your evaluations will take various forms: – You recognize misunderstandings or deceptions. He isn’t really answering the question, is he? He knows a lot about our trading relationship with Asian countries, but hasn’t said one word about Europe. – You recognize discrepancies between old information and new. Did she say 20 percent? I’ve heard estimates much, much higher. I wonder which number is accurate. Wait a minute. Didn’t he just say the opposite of that last week? (continued) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  14. 14. Tips for EvaluatingWhat You Hear – You check your own understanding.Oh, I get it. To speed up the approval process, from now on I could… I guess this means the budget cut will affect us sooner rather than later. – You clarify information. Oh, I thought she said 70 before. She must have said 17. That graph sure helps. Now I see the sales growth she’s talking about. – You recognize similarities between old and new information. Hmm, this agrees with what I read yesterday in the newspaper. The problems he’s reporting about the project are just like those that surfaced on the earlier project. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  15. 15. 1. What is bias?2. How can skepticism be useful to the listening process? (continued) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  16. 16. 3. What can be used in addition to the words to understand the meaning of a message? © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  17. 17. Active Listening inFormal Situations • Indicate you are paying attention. – show attention – take notes; only on what is meaningful • Tips for taking good notes: – Be selective. Write down only what is important or you may not remember. – Organize your notes as you write, if possible. Let the format of your notes correspond to the speaker’s message. – Use abbreviations and symbols. If the notes are for you only, cut as many corners as you like as long as the notes remain useful. (continued) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  18. 18. Active Listening inFormal Situations – Avoid noting information that appears in a handout. Highlight or put a check mark in the margin of the hand out to remind yourself of key points. – Write down the main point of a visual aid. If it contains data you need later, write down the source or ask the speaker afterward for a copy of the graphic. – Often speakers summarize the most important points in the closing. This is a good time to be listening carefully with pen ready, if necessary. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  19. 19. Active Listening inFormal Situations • Give feedback – friendly questions, not unfriendly questions – make comments • Arrive early • Sit in the front © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  20. 20. Active Listening inFormal Situations • Do not ask unfriendly questions. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  21. 21. Active Listening inFormal Situations • Fight distractions and barriers – Barriers are internal or external. – Fight external distractions. – Listen actively. – Be open-minded without bias. – Be flexible. – Be sincere. – Stay interested; do not multitask. – Be attentive. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  22. 22. 1. In face-to-face communication, how can you indicate you are paying attention without saying anything?2. When taking notes, which points should you write down? (continued) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  23. 23. 3. What are the two best ways of providing feedback?4. What are the two ways to classify barriers to listening? © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  24. 24. • Hearing is the physical process of sound waves being processed by the brain.• You can become an active listener with practice.• Formal business situations require extra attention to show you are an active listener. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.

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