PoC_ch10

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PoC_ch10

  1. 1. 1 “The limits of my language means the limits of my world.” ― Ludwig Wittgenstein, 20th century philosopher and leader of Philosophy of Language movement0 Writing EffectiveBusiness Communication
  2. 2. After completing the chapter, you will be able to:• Write positive- and negative-informational messages using direct and indirect approaches.• Write requests that display courtesy and reasonableness to elicit a favorable response.• Write simple and complex responses that promote the goodwill of an organization.• Write an effective message to persuade that has a positive tone and is reader oriented.• Write an effective message to sell that has a positive tone and is reader oriented. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use
  3. 3. Planning• Writing an effective business document begins with planning.• Ask these questions: – Why are you writing? – Who is your audience? – What do you want the reader to think and do? – What ideas do you want to communicate? © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use
  4. 4. 1. What begins the process of writing an effective business document?2. What are the four C’s of communication? © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use
  5. 5. Providing Information • Four approaches: – positive and neutral messages – negative messages – routine informational messages – transmittal messages Shutterstock © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use
  6. 6. Providing Information • Positive or neutral messages – use to share positive news or straightforward information that is neutral – state your reason for writing – provide the information – close courteously © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use
  7. 7. Providing Information • Negative messages – use to inform someone of bad news – begin with an explanation – state the negative information in positive language – close courteously © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use
  8. 8. Providing Information • Routine messages – also known as confirmation message – written to confirm a verbal agreement made with a customer, client, or colleague – may be informal with colleagues and in an e- mail – more formal for customers © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use
  9. 9. Providing Information • Guidelines for a confirmation message © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use
  10. 10. Providing Information • Transmittal messages are routine communication accompanying documents or other materials attached to e-mails or sent by a delivery service to serve as a record of when something was sent. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use
  11. 11. Providing Information • Guidelines for a transmittal message © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use
  12. 12. 1. When should the direct approach be used?2. Which approach should be used to deliver a negative message? (continued) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use
  13. 13. 3. What is the purpose of a confirmation message?4. How is a transmittal message used? © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use
  14. 14. Instructions and Directions • Instructions usually can be carried out in any order. • Directions, whether simple or complex, usually must be followed in sequence. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use
  15. 15. 1. What is the difference between instructions and directions?2. Which format is best for instructions and directions? © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use
  16. 16. Technical Messages• Technical message or technical documents inform the reader and are often instructions or directions. – user manuals – installations instructions – software documentation and help files – service sheets• It is important to understand the knowledge level of the reader. – determines level of content – determines language, which must be accessible to reader © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use
  17. 17. 1. What is the purpose of a technical document?2. Why is it important to understand the knowledge of the reader when creating a technical document? © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use
  18. 18. Making Requests• Routine requests are expected by the receiver. – requests for materials, information, and services• Special requests are complex and need explanation. – require planning to create a positive response © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use
  19. 19. Making Requests• When making requests: – be clear, specific, and accurate – provide adequate information for a response – provide background information – be courteous – be reasonable © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use
  20. 20. Making Requests• Provide background information – helps avoid a negative response from the reader – reader may be more helpful with full knowledge of the background information• Use diplomacy – tactful handling of a situation – avoids offending reader – avoids arousing hostility © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use
  21. 21. 1. What is the difference between a routine request and a special request?2. What is diplomacy? (continued) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use
  22. 22. 3. Why would you need to provide background information? © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use
  23. 23. Responding to Requests• Form response – uses standard language known as boilerplate information – frequently asked questions (FAQs) are usually answered via a form response © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use
  24. 24. Responding to Requests• Example of a form response © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use
  25. 25. Responding to Requests• Courtesy response – confirms that a message was received and action was taken• Nonroutine response – used for situations that require responses, but do not fit a set pattern © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use
  26. 26. Responding to Requests• Example of a courtesy response © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use
  27. 27. 1. What does FAQ stand for?2. What is the purpose of a courtesy response?3. Describe a nonroutine response. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use
  28. 28. Writing BusinessMessages to Persuade• Messages to persuade convince the reader to take a certain course of action. – attract the reader’s attention – build the reader’s interest – create desire for the product or service – anticipate questions and objections – encourage the reader to take action © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use
  29. 29. 1. What is the purpose of a persuasive message?2. List the five elements critical to an effective persuasive message. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use
  30. 30. Writing a Sales Message • Sales message persuades the reader to spend money for a product or service, either immediately or later. – attract the reader’s attention – build the reader’s interest – create desire for the product or service – anticipate questions and objections – encourage the reader to take action © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use
  31. 31. Writing a Sales Message • Parts of a sales message (continued) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use
  32. 32. Writing a Sales Message • Parts of a sales message © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use
  33. 33. 1. What is the key difference between a sales message and other persuasive messages?2. What are the five elements critical to an effective sales message? © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use
  34. 34. • Writing effective business documents is a process that begins with planning.• Putting information in writing avoids miscommunication and provides a record.• Instructions should be written to confirm expectations.• Technical messages and documents provide the reader with technical information.• When making a request, apply the rules of communication and be clear, specific, and accurate. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use
  35. 35. • Try to build goodwill for your organization as well as yourself.• Writing persuasive messages requires learning how to convince someone to do something.• A good sales message attracts the reader’s attention, builds the reader’s interest, creates desire for the product or service, and induces the reader to take action. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use

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