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POC_Ch01 POC_Ch01 Presentation Transcript

  • “The art of communication is the 1 language of leadership.” ― James C. Humes, American author and presidential speech writer Understanding theCommunication Process
  • After completing the chapter, you will be able to:• Describe the state of communication today.• Identify the steps in the communication process.• Compare informal and formal business communication.• Explain the written and verbal communication skills that are essential to successful communication in the workplace.• Describe the role nonverbal communication skills play in the communication process.• Discuss how to overcome common barriers to effective communication. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  • Communicating Today• Communication is the process of sending and receiving messages that convey information, ideas, feelings, and beliefs. Shutterstock © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  • 1. What is communication?2. How has technology changed communication over the past decade? © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  • Communication Process • We communicate to: – share information – create relationships – persuade – entertain others Shutterstock © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  • Communication Process • There are six parts of the communication process: – sender – message – channel – receiver – translation – feedback Photos: Shutterstock © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  • Communication Process • Sender – begins the communication process – decides there is a need to relay information to the receiver – assembles the information – information takes the form of the message © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  • Communication Process • Message – Sender decides the format of the message: • words (written or spoken) • pictures • video – Putting the message into the format it will be sent to the receiver in is known as encoding. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  • Communication Process • Channel – Sender decides channel through which to send the message: • face-to-face conversation • telephone conversation • letter • e-mail © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  • Communication Process • Receiver – Physically receives the message – Has responsibility to the sender • Giving attention to the message is essential to the communication process. • Giving attention to the sender is both a matter of courtesy and necessity. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  • Communication Process • Translation – Once the receiver receives a message, it will be translated, or decoded, to see if the contents are understood. – Message is not actually “received” if the receiver does not understand the content of the message. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  • Communication Process • Feedback – receiver’s response to a message – tells the sender if the receiver understood the message as it was intended © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  • 1. What are the six parts of the communication process?2. What is the difference between encoding and decoding? © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  • Informal and FormalBusiness Communication • Informal communication is casual sharing of information with no customs or rules of etiquette involved. – text messaging – telephone calls – talking at the water cooler Shutterstock © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  • Informal and FormalBusiness Communication • Formal communication follows protocol (rules of etiquette) as to how levels of employees interact with each other. – Upward communication is with supervisors, managers, and executives. – Lateral communication is with peers (persons of equal standing or work position). – Downward communication is with those over whom you have a position of authority. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  • Informal and FormalBusiness Communication • Formal communication © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  • 1. What is the difference between formal and informal business communication?2. What is a protocol? © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  • Written and VerbalCommunication • Written communication means recording words through writing or keying to communicate. – use Standard English and business style for formatting documents – business communication represents you and your company – written communication creates a record that can be recalled in the future © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  • Written and VerbalCommunication • Verbal communication means speaking words to communicate. – Organizing thoughts is an important part of verbal communication. – Planning involves thinking about who will receive the message and what you want to accomplish. • make notes before meeting • have an agenda • research information • Planning saves time. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  • Written and VerbalCommunication • Nonverbal communication refers to actions, as opposed to words, that send messages. – body language – touch and space – behavior – paralanguage Shutterstock © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  • 1. What is written communication?2. What is verbal communication? © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  • Nonverbal Communication • Body language is nonverbal messages. – gestures – facial expressions – other body actions or postures – context determines meaning of body language • Context is the environment or setting in which something occurs or is communicated. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  • Nonverbal Communication • Touch and space – Touch—a handshake – Space—distance between yourself and the other person • Use judgment when standing next to others in business. • The personal space of others varies depending on your social upbringing and community norms. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  • Nonverbal Communication • Touch and space – Take behavioral cues from others with more experience, but do not make the mistake of emulating poor habits – “Your actions speak louder than words” © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  • Nonverbal Communication • Paralanguage – the attitude you project with the tone and pitch of your voice – Tone, pitch, quality of voice, and rate of speaking convey emotions that will be judged by the receiver, regardless of the content of the message. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  • 1. What is nonverbal communication?2. Why is paralanguage considered nonverbal communication? © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  • Barriers to EffectiveCommunication • Barriers are anything that prevents clear, effective communication. • Barriers may occur in written, verbal, and nonverbal communication. Shutterstock © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  • Barriers to EffectiveCommunication • Sending barriers occur when the sender says or does something that causes the receiver to tune out. – do not assume what the receiver knows – select appropriate format for message, e-mail or a phone call, based on the situation – ask for feedback from the receiver © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  • Barriers to EffectiveCommunication • Receiving barriers happen when the receiver says or does something that causes the sender’s message not to be received. – Make sure you read all of what has been written. – Take responsibility for getting clarification if you do not understand the message. – Hearing is an innate ability, except in the case of a physical disability. – Listening is a conscious action. – Give feedback. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  • 1. What is a sending barrier?2. What is a receiving barrier? © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  • • Communication is the process of sending and receiving messages that convey information, ideas, feelings, and beliefs.• The communication process is a series of actions on the part of the sender and the receiver of the message.• Informal business communication is casual sharing of information with no customs or rules of etiquette. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  • • Written communication means recording words through writing or keying to communicate.• Nonverbal includes body language and behavior.• Barriers can be sending or receiving barriers. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.