Gwen Nytes
Newton’s         3rd   LawEvery action has an equal andopposite reaction, unless acted on by an unbalanced force.
Friction Friction – a resistance between  two objects To find friction, you take the  mass of the object and multiply  i...
LABFriction
Objective Demonstrate static and kinetic friction, and see how friction changes when the surface is different
Materials Rubber band Shoe with rubber bottom Ruler
Procedure Weigh shoe Cut rubber band and tie one end to the shoe Set shoe on asphalt and start pulling on the    other ...
Static and Kinetic           Friction After comparing measurements, we found  that the rubber band stretches farther  bef...
Calculating Friction To find the value of the frictional force, you  multiply the weight of the object by the frictional ...
Friction and Newton’s         3 rd LawFriction is related to Newton’s 3rd law    (every action has an equal and opposite r...
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Friction

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HoopmanScience
Contract 23

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Friction

  1. 1. Gwen Nytes
  2. 2. Newton’s 3rd LawEvery action has an equal andopposite reaction, unless acted on by an unbalanced force.
  3. 3. Friction Friction – a resistance between two objects To find friction, you take the mass of the object and multiply it by the frictional coefficient.
  4. 4. LABFriction
  5. 5. Objective Demonstrate static and kinetic friction, and see how friction changes when the surface is different
  6. 6. Materials Rubber band Shoe with rubber bottom Ruler
  7. 7. Procedure Weigh shoe Cut rubber band and tie one end to the shoe Set shoe on asphalt and start pulling on the other end of the rubber band until the shoe starts to move Use ruler to measure how far the rubber band stretches before the shoe moves Once it’s moving measure how far the rubber band is stretched Compare measurements Repeat steps 3-6 on concrete instead of asphalt
  8. 8. Static and Kinetic Friction After comparing measurements, we found that the rubber band stretches farther before the shoe starts to move. This is because it has to overcome static force for it to move. Once it was moving, the stretch of the rubber band wasn’t as much, because then it was just being influenced by kinetic friction.
  9. 9. Calculating Friction To find the value of the frictional force, you multiply the weight of the object by the frictional coefficient. For the first trial, we used the rubber bottom of a shoe on asphalt. That coefficient is 0.9, so we multiply the shoe’s weight by 0.9 For the second trial, we used the rubber bottom on concrete, and that coefficient is 0.7. Then we multiply the weight by 0.7
  10. 10. Friction and Newton’s 3 rd LawFriction is related to Newton’s 3rd law (every action has an equal and opposite reaction). When you try to push or pull an object, a frictional force is always acting against that motion, whether it’s in the air or on another surface.

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