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Police K9 Decoy School Presentation

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Tarheel Canine Training, Inc. Our most popular K9 seminar is the decoy seminar. A lack of skill in your decoys will reflect in poor performance of your patrol dogs. Enhance your Patrol performance by …

Tarheel Canine Training, Inc. Our most popular K9 seminar is the decoy seminar. A lack of skill in your decoys will reflect in poor performance of your patrol dogs. Enhance your Patrol performance by having your decoys view this presentation, and come to a decoy school put on by Jerry Bradshaw of Tarheel Canine.

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  • Timing: Rewarding a dog at the end of a routine is pointless. You must reward individual behaviors immediately after they are performed. Intensity: Rewards can be too big, and thus distracting, or too small, and as such inconsequential. Reward intensity should fit the behavior, circumstance and achievement. Interval: Initially, continuous reinforcement by which a dog is rewarded every time for a correct behavior leads to rapid learning. Continuously reinforced behaviors are the easiest to extinguish. However, Intermittent (Variable) reinforcement schedules create the strongest learned behaviors, and as such are the hardest to extinguish. E.G. For our discussion, suppose the handler positively reinforces the dog’s dominance behaviors on a variable schedule (inconsistently dealing with the dog’s dominance plays). This makes for a behavior problem that is difficult to extinguish.
  • Timing must be immediate & consistently applied for punishment to be properly interpreted. Inconsistently applied punishment can create a neurotic condition called learned helplessness. Intensity: Punishments can be too big, and thus interfere with learning (stress), or too small, and as such inconsequential. Intensity should fit the behavior, circumstance, transgression, and temperament of the dog. Positive punishment must be perceived as serious and be somewhat traumatic (but not enough to overwhelm) to register (no nagging). The consequence must be undesirable as perceived by the dog in question .
  • Linear, meaning that we just do the same thing over and over - the adage consistency & repetition is an oversimplification. Baiting/Reward/Variable Reward is a non-linear process that requires the trainer to make adjustments in how reinforcement is delivered.
  • Pre-Avoidance (Civil): pitch of bark, physical commitment, ground sniffing, handler dependency, yawning…. Pre-Avoidance (Biting): Eyes closing, growling, slipping….popping off….

Transcript

  • 1. Police K9 Decoy School
    • Jerry Bradshaw, Training Director.
    • Dave Colborn, Head Trainer.
    • Tarheel Canine Training Inc.
    • TarheelCanine.com
    • [email_address]
  • 2. Integrating Decoy Work & Training
    • Old Way: Suit up young guys & RUN!
    • New Way: Decoy is the mechanism by which the Patrol dog’s behaviors are conditioned
    • Therefore decoys need to be more schooled in learning theory and training techniques than the average handler.
    • Technique!
  • 3. Quality Decoy Work (Videos)
    • Assists the Development of K9
    • Brings Appropriate Challenge
    • Teaches & Maintains Good Patrol Skills
    • Realism
    • Teaches the dog to Fight
  • 4. Current Theories of Decoy Work
    • “ Biting in the Core.” – F. Angelini
    • “ True Combat Agitation.” – W. Nope
  • 5. Learning Theory: How Behaviors/Responses are Learned
    • Observation : Mimicking behaviors
    • Classical Conditioning : Learning by association.
    • Operant Conditioning : Learning by consequence.
        • Reinforcing Consequences (positive & negative)
        • Punishing Consequences (positive & negative)
  • 6. Reinforcement
    • Reinforcement is any consequence that increases the likelihood of a behavior recurring.
    • Positive Reinforcement is providing a desirable consequence to increase the likelihood of a behavior.
    • Negative Reinforcement is removing an undesirable consequence to increase the likelihood of a behavior.
    • Secondary Reinforcement (Signals the reinforcement that is coming).
    • Timing, intensity, and intervals of reinforcement shape learned behaviors.
  • 7. Reinforcement Continued….
    • Timing: Rewarding a dog at the end of a routine is pointless. You must reward individual behaviors immediately after they are performed.
    • Intensity: Rewards can be too big, and thus distracting, or too small, and as such inconsequential. Reward intensity should fit the behavior, circumstance and achievement.
    • Interval: Initially, continuous reinforcement by which a dog is rewarded every time for a correct behavior leads to rapid learning. Continuously reinforced behaviors are the easiest to extinguish. However, Intermittent (Variable) reinforcement schedules create the strongest learned behaviors, and as such are the hardest to extinguish.
    • E.G. For our discussion, suppose the handler positively reinforces the dog’s dominance behaviors on a variable schedule (inconsistently dealing with the dog’s dominance plays). This makes for a behavior problem that is difficult to extinguish.
  • 8. Punishment
    • Punishment is any consequence that reduces the likelihood of a behavior recurring.
    • Positive Punishment: providing an undesirable consequence to reduce the likelihood of a behavior.
    • Negative Punishment: withholding a desirable consequence to reduce the likelihood of a behavior.
    • Secondary Punishments (Signal the act of punishment) – “AnnnAnnh” or “No” or “Pfui”
  • 9. Punishment Continued……
    • Timing must be immediate & consistently applied.
    • Inconsistently applied punishment can create a neurotic condition called learned helplessness.
    • Intensity must be correct for the transgression.
    • Positive punishment must be perceived as serious
  • 10. Summary of learning
    • Dogs learn through observation, classical, and operant conditioning.
    • Learning takes place whether we are aware of it or not. The dog’s environment provides myriad consequences (operant), and associations (classical).
    • Learning is not a linear process.
  • 11. Basic Equipment
    • Sleeves
    • Suits
    • Hidden Sleeves
    • Muzzle
    • Lines (6 Foot, 15 Foot, 30 Foot)
    • Collars (Flat 2”, Choke, Prong, E-Collar)
    • Harness
  • 12. Equipment…..Sleeves
  • 13. Equipment…..Sticks
  • 14. Equipment…..Lines & Collars
  • 15. Equipment….Muzzle and Harness
  • 16. Bite Suit Styles…….
  • 17. Line Handling
    • There is ALWAYS equipment on your dog to influence his behavior.
    • Line Tension has Meaning (Slack, Tight)
    • Opposition Reflex
  • 18. Training Set-Ups
    • Back Tie
    • Handler Posts Dog
    • Double Line (Back Tie or Handler Post)
    • Sends (K9 Drags or Handler Attaches on the Grip)
    • Example: Out Problem dog on Area Search
  • 19. Decoy is the Mechanism….
    • … . Of Operant Conditioning
    • Decoy gives grips which are the rewards for the behaviors of biting, apprehending, searching.
    • Decoy controls the timing and Intensity and interval of reinforcement.
    • Trainer controls the reward in the larger picture, i.e. where to place the decoy.
  • 20. Controlled Aggression Fundamentals
    • Prey & Biting Behavior - (Full, Firm, Hard) Grips and Strong Pursuit, and Entry.
    • Defense & Civil Aggression – Aggressive on Command, when no equipment is present, and the nerve to stand and fight.
    • Ability to Channel drives from Prey to defense and vice versa, multiple times.
    • Targeting Equipment Properly
      • Sleeve (Center)
      • Suit (Multiple Target Areas) but not “everywhere”.
    • Decoy needs to know how to make all this happen!
  • 21. Controlled Aggression Skills
    • Out on Command (out & Guard, Out & Return).
    • Man Orientation Techniques
    • Search Training (Area & Building)
    • Redirects
    • Call-Offs
  • 22. Decoy’s Responsibilities
    • Know how to catch safely
    • Know how to build prey, defense, and Channeling of the drives.
    • Know how to develop grips
    • Understand conditioning principles (e.g. conditioning theory, back chaining behavior sequences).
    • Know how to train targeting.
    • Know how to teach skills – Out, Redirects, Searching, Call-Off for example.
    • If you get in the suit and don’t know how to do these things you are not a decoy, just a guy in a bite suit, and anyone can do that. Usually poorly.
  • 23. A Bite Session (Handler Post)
    • Decoy Agitates (Mistake)
    • Decoy Delivers
    • Makes Grip Full
    • Prey to Defense
    • Defense to Prey
    • Release (Removal)
    • Finishes with Agitation
  • 24. Key Ideas for the Decoy
    • Must set Goals (long, medium, short)
    • Must Set up session Properly
    • Must Read Dog’s behavior against Goals
    • Must know how to react to that behavior (mechanics) to promote those goals.
  • 25. Reinforcing & Punishing Aggression
    • Building Aggression (Foundation)
    • Creating appropriate contexts & cues for Aggression (Skills)
    • Eliminating Aggression in Certain Circumstances (de-conditioning)
  • 26. Drive Theory of Aggression
    • Prey Drive (trigger is movement)
    • Defense Drive (threat is trigger)
    • Social Drive (infringement of social position is the trigger)
    • “ Fight Drive*” (learned enjoyment of combat and is a trained response).
    • Drives are inherent, genetically hard wired, behavioral responses to certain stimuli (triggers).
  • 27. Behavioral Classifications of Canine Aggression
    • Displacement (S)  
    • Dominance (S)  
    • Fear-Elicited (D)  
    • Intra-Male (S)  
    • Intra-Species (D)  
    • Maternal (D)  
    • Object Possessive (P)  
    • Pain-Elicited (D)  
    • Predatory (P)  
    • Territorial (D)  
  • 28. Boil That Down….
    • Social Aggression (S)
    • Prey Aggression (P)
    • Defensive Aggression (D)
  • 29. Methods for controlling aggression
    • Out & Guard (sit, lie down, bark)
    • Redirect
    • Corollary: Out & Return to cover
    • “ Call-off” (aka Recall, Stopped Attack – dog can return or lay down and watch suspect).
    • Tactical Removal.
  • 30. Prey Aggression Goals
    • Alert (Dog starts Action).
      • Dog Begins Action/Decoy rewards alert
      • Barking Brings Movement.
      • Prey Passes build Frustration
    • Delivery/Entry/Strike (Into Circle)
    • Grip (Firm, Full & Hard)
      • Full - Use Countering Techniques
      • Firm – Use back pressure to keep grip steady
      • Hard – Over time, back pressure
    • Reward & Reposition (Slip)
    • Disengage & Restart (Prey Guarding)
  • 31. Defensive Aggression Goals
    • Place Defense Threshold on Command
    • Lower Defense Threshold
    • Raise Avoidance Threshold
  • 32. Pre-Avoidance & Displacement
    • During Civil Work (civil confrontation pressure)
    • During Bite work (on the grip under pressure)
    • Decoy MUST read the pre-avoidance signs.
    • What are they?
    • What is the helper’s barometer in bitework?
  • 33. Targeting……
  • 34. Why Targeting Training?
    • Robinette V. Barnes says dogs are not “deadly force”
    • Training records consistent with this idea reflect that K9s are not allowed to target face, neck and groin areas, because they ARE taught to target forearms, bicep, tricep, calf, shin.
    • Decoy Safety demands it.
    • Lessens chance dog will not engage 1 st street bite.
    • Lessens chance the dog can be run off a grip.
    • Clear conditioning results in powerful grips, engagements, and fights.
  • 35. Human Focused Aggression
    • Can be naturally present (Classically defensive dog)
    • Can be taught (non-classically aggressive or prey dog)
    • Training Progression
  • 36. Passive Bites
    • Begins with properly trained alert behavior
    • Decoys need to change how they think
    • Old Technique => Movement draws aggression
    • New Technique => stillness and passivity are key to aggression.
    • “ Dog makes passive guy into prey through aggression”
    • Back Chaining the Passive bite
  • 37. Muzzle Work
    • Conditioning Muzzle
    • Passive Bites First
    • On Leash or On Long Line – Positive control for safety and to build frustration/aggression
    • Dog must bring the energy to fight and stay engaged
    • Decoy must be highly skilled in reading the dog
    • Key is opposition reflex
    • If you remove the dog when he loses interest to “reward” him with a bite, he will lose interest faster and faster in anticipation of the grip – you teach him to become LESS aggressive in muzzle to win the grip!
  • 38. Basic Skills Training
    • Out
    • Redirect
    • Call-Off
    • Searching (Building, Area)
  • 39. Out on Command Videos…
  • 40. Out Video 1
  • 41. Out Video 2
  • 42. Out Training Progression
    • Vary the out on back-tie from sleeves, to suit, to hidden sleeves.
    • Move from 2 lines on the back-tie to 2 lines in the field, and proceed to vary the environmental context: Field, buildings, woods, tight spaces, decoy position
    • Move from 2 lines to one line on correction collar, handler initiating the corrections, and proceed through varying the environmental context, again.
    • Incorporate e-collar (helpful for distance work later in recalls).
  • 43. Redirect & Call-Off Videos
  • 44. Re-Directed Bites
    • I train it after the Out & Guard – you don’t have to.
    • Redirects lead us to the out & return.
    • Redirects are the foundation for the clean, conflict-free call-off.
  • 45. Redirected bites: Set up for success
    • Prerequisites: Dog must have a good motivational recall, and understand being forced to out for a reward.
    • Equipment: Long line on flat collar, and a short line on correction collar.
  • 46. Re-directed bites: Technique
    • Start purely motivationally
    • Maintain proper line handling to set the grip when the dog is in the grip (tight line), and loose line when you are ready for the dog to come back (reassurance).
    • Pick a command that means come back to me – I use the dog’s name. Do not use the same word that is to mean release and stay!
    • Once dog is on decoy #1, that decoy picks up the correction line to be ready.
    • signal (non-verbal) for the decoy to stop the fight, call the dog’s name, and immediately, decoy #2 agitates to draw the dog back.
  • 47. Three Possible Outcomes
    • Dog releases and heads for the agitating decoy, and receives a reward for returning.
    • Dog releases and does what he knows contextually: starts to fall into a guard. Handler must be ready to encourage the dog with long line back to (agitating) decoy #2, and not allow a dirty grip (common).
    • Dog does not react to name/agitation of decoy #2. Decoy #1 gives correction to force the release, and handler immediately guides the dog back to decoy #2 for a grip.
  • 48. Progression
    • Once the dog will release on name and return multiple times, add in out and guard on a variable basis.
    • Example: Redirect -> out/guard ->rebite -> redirect -> redirect -> out/guard -> rebite -> out/guard -> pick-up.
    • Out & Return: Make the dog stop on the way back and down next to you, pause, and send the dog along. Work your way to getting the dog to come to heel, and resend the dog from heel on to the next decoy.
    • Put the decoys in hiding, and make it a tactical scenario (area search, extraction), starting from cover, and have reward bite for the return come from a hiding place. The dog will think a reward bite is coming if he comes to heel. Variably reward the redirect behavior.
    • Vary the equipment, from sleeves, to suits to hidden sleeves, to muzzle.
  • 49. Call Off Technique Continued…
    • Mix up the dog’s orientation constantly, with decoys changing ends of the hallway, and/or sending the dog for a bite and slip, so he doesn’t anticipate anything.
    • Disorienting the contextual cues keeps the dog from acting on context rather than your commands.
    • Vary the depth of the call off, and the distance of the decoys from you.
    • Condition the responses – don’t rush the process.
    • Incorporate e-collar prior to moving to grass - recommended.
    • If you did a good job you will again have to push to failure.
    • Once on grass everything speeds up! Wear gloves, and double hook pinch collar. Start with short call offs.
    • Incorporate all your disengage techniques into multiple decoy scenarios.
    • Ex: send to bite -> redirect -> redirect -> call-off -> redirect -> out and guard -> rebite -> redirect -> Tactical removal.
  • 50. Searching: The Key Principles
    • Systematic (Hot/Warm/Cold)
    • Fading The Cue
    • You must wean the stimulation or else you will create searching problems.
    • Backward chain – Train the last exercise first, and proceed back to the first exercise, last.
  • 51. Break Down the Exercise
    • Start (context & command cue)
      • Systematic Desensitization of Prompt
    • Searching behavior
      • Principle of variable reward enhances hunting
    • Alert (aggressive or passive)
    • These are trained separately at first, then put together in a backward behavior chain.