1920s women
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

1920s women

on

  • 1,978 views

A team of three students conducted research on women in the 1920s and created this museum exhibit

A team of three students conducted research on women in the 1920s and created this museum exhibit

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,978
Views on SlideShare
1,977
Embed Views
1

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0

1 Embed 1

https://my.msjc.edu 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

1920s women Presentation Transcript

  • 1. An exhibit of the imagery of women in the 1920s With special consideration to the striking contrast between Flappers and Mothers
  • 2. it
  • 3. With a stern expression and unattractive face, this “Threatening Mother-in-law postcard displays the “no-nonsense” personality of mothers in the 1920s. Postcards show the popular feelings of a period, and are usually based on pop culture, rather than commercial use. It was accessioned into the museums collection for US $7.00.Popular 1920s Postcard
  • 4. The contrast between the stylish woman and the more traditional mother, makes the claim that using this detergent will turn a “dirty” i.e., flapper, into a “cleaner” more acceptable Woman. Pay attention to the phrase “It is just a scientific blend of two old, well known household helps” as it reinforces the idea of not only cultural ideas based on science and fact, but also the “older” and more “traditional” features are best. It was accessioned into the museums collection for US $9.69.1926 Advertisement for Ammo Cleaner
  • 5. This ad for an oil stove that is supposed to ease the burden of housework on the modern woman, but the opposite is displayed here. The woman works at her “station,” busily spending her time on cooking and chores rather than individual improvement. It was accessioned into the museums collection for US $5.91.1929 Florence Stove Advertisement
  • 6. This ad shows three women, all appearing as well-dressed and of good fortune. This makes the refrigerator seem as an appliance of luxury, rather than that of housework, an important distinction for women. Housewives, while cooking and cleaning, should never believe their chores as drudgery, but rather as pleasant work. It was accessioned into the museums collection for US $4.95.1928 General Electric Refrigerator Advertisement
  • 7. This booklet cover displays one important aspect of housewives’ depictions, which is their homogeny. By creating the image of every woman appearing the same, advertisements urged women to conform into one singular identity, rather than find individualism. Recipe books are particularly useful for museums when purchasing items on EBay, as they show what exactly is the perfect mother image. It was accessioned into the museums collection for US $34.99.1930 Jell-o Recipe Booklet
  • 8. This advertisement delineates an important distinction for the housemother, which is a focus on “purity” and “cleanliness.” Museum researchers love finding a piece like this, that focuses on aspects of gender roles, popular culture, and plausible racism. It was accessioned into the museums collection for US $5.91.La France Laundry Detergent from 1922
  • 9. This Wilson Brothers Clothing Magazine Ad was featured during the 1920s in the "Saturday Evening Post". It gives insight into the American culture during the 1920s with its homely images that were appealing to all of a couple. This particular advertisement pertains to the summer clothing season through indication of its title "Shirts that give Summer comfort with distinction". It is then followed by a description of the company Wilson Brothers. It was accessioned into the museums collection for US $7.20Wilson Brothers Clothing Magazine Ad 1920s
  • 10. This was the typical style of many flapper dresses during the 1920s. Women were often wearing this style of dress for particular kinds of outings. They would have accessories that matched and were often found to be in different night clubs, dance halls, and other areas of entertainment. This dress was created by Charles A. Stevens in Chicago, U.S. It was accessioned into the museums collection for US $95.00.Antique 1920s Flapper Dress – Charles A.Sevens Chicago
  • 11. Not only does this hat show the fun, modern look of flappers in the Jazz Age, but also illustrates the items a museum historian encounters on EBay. Hats and other accessories last longer than bigger items, such as dresses, so their presence in an exhibit adds a flair of reality and fashion. It was accessioned into the museums collection for US $189.99.1920s Flapper Cloche Hat
  • 12. This style of dress was common for a homemaker or young lady. It was a conservative cut that would typically be worn to different special occasions due to the material that was used in its creation. Floral patterns were popular during the 1920s. The style is a sweet party dress as indicated in its title. This item was accessioned into the museums collection for US $95.00.Vintage Silk Floral Print Bias Sweep Party Dress– 1920s
  • 13. This item is an original sewing machine from Bullet Bobbin Winder during the 1920s. it was often used with sewing patterns that homemakers would use to create clothing. These kinds of sewing machines were found in many American homes during the 1920s. It includes the mounting bracket, rod and screws. This item was accessioned into the museums collection for US $20.00.Vintage Sewing Machine Bullet Bobbin Winder– 1920
  • 14. A fashionable flapper had short sleek hair, a shorter than average shapeless shift dress, flatten her chest, wore make up, smoked cigarettes, and rebelled against the traditional look of a women of that time. Depicted here are women of lower to middle class, enjoying the fashionable style. This was accessioned into the museums collection for US $5.91.1928 Walter Field Co Dress Fashion Ad
  • 15. Ads were leaning more towards sexier women, opposed to the traditional stay at home mother. These ads caught more attention, and stirred up a lot of buzz. The women seen in the ad had the typical flapper style, the short hair, the boxed shape dress, very fitted and very short, for the time period Flapper style showed women in a new light, they didn’t just have to be the stay at home wives, they could also be seen as sexy women embracing their feminism and enjoying life. This was accessioned into the museums collection for US $3.25.1920s Absorbine Jr Advertisement
  • 16. High fashion typically had been for the richer class, but because making a flapper styled dress was less complicated than other styles, many women were able to recreate the style at home. Silk dresses like the ones shown in this newspaper ad were geared more towards the upper class, but the lower class were able to join in one the new emerging style. It was accessioned into the museums collection for US $19.99.Fitzgerald’s 1920s Fashion Ads
  • 17. Using beautiful fashionable women in ads was a way to get women to want to buy their products so they could be like the women in the ad. With this new style they were able to create many different looks, like these stylish foot saver shoes. The ads show a young chic woman, wearing and enjoying these shoes, draws attention to their product. This was accessioned into the museums collection for US $4.95.1920s Foot Saver Shoes Advertisement
  • 18. The flapper fashion style flourished among the middle classes negating differences between themselves and rich, but continuing to highlight some differences with the really poor. Every class of women was able to enjoy this style in their own way. In the 1920s flapper style, seen in the picture above, the women are very covered up. The dresses were calf length to below the knee, which was quite short for most of the decade. A misconception of the flapper style usually comes from moving films, where you see women dancing showing very visible knees and legs. This was accessioned into the museums collection for US $6.95.1920s John LaGatta advertisement
  • 19. This concludes the museumexhibit. Press “ESC” toexit, or the arrow to returnto the beginning.