CIPD Stress slides Nov 24th

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  • Show of hands: How many of you are as physically active as you would like to be? How many of you would like to be more physically active than you are How many of you do regular formal exercise / training How many enjoy formal exercise / sports / activities
  • The question that must always be asked – what can I do something about and what can I do nothing about. “ The adverse reaction people have to excessive pressure or other types of demand placed upon them.” – Health and Safety Executive  “ A mental and/or physical response, by an individual, to an inappropriate level of pressure whether real or perceived.” - Raymond & Wilson ( 1999) “ A condition or feeling experienced when a person perceives that the demands placed on them exceed the resources the individual has available.” - Lazarus et al (1984)
  • Show of hands: How many of you are as physically active as you would like to be? How many of you would like to be more physically active than you are How many of you do regular formal exercise / training How many enjoy formal exercise / sports / activities
  • Show of hands: How many of you are as physically active as you would like to be? How many of you would like to be more physically active than you are How many of you do regular formal exercise / training How many enjoy formal exercise / sports / activities
  • We now know, based on research done in Canada and the US, that the heart has its own intrinsic nervous system consisting at least 40,000 neurons. This is considered an intelligent system which is constantly sending information to your brain. The neural signals the heart sends to the brain especially affect the brain centers involved in decision-making and emotional experience. Pretty cool stuff, isn’t it? Maybe the old expression “follow your heart” had more truth to it than we knew. The heart has a complex nervous system consisting of many types of neurons. Scientists around the world who study the heart’s nervous system actually call it the “brain in the heart”. There are large nerve pathways connecting the heart and brain. Many of these pathways have connections to the higher perceptual centers in the brain. This means that there is an important on-going neurological conversation taking place between heart and brain. The heart signals especially affect the brain centers involved in decision making, creativity and emotional experience. Heart researchers have learned that the brain sends information to the heart that affects the timing of the heart beat and the heart sends important information back to the brain. When scientists map out this biological conversation they clearly see that the heart is sending a lot more information to the brain than it receives. In fact it’s now well-known that many brain functions are critically dependent on signals coming from the heart. Transition: The heart is the most powerful generator of rhythmic information patterns in the body and helps to synchronize our entire system via information back to the brain. w
  • When the doctor checks your pulse (also called “resting heart rate”), that number is only an average because your heart is actually speeding up and slowing down all the time. And it’s your ANS which regulates the heart’s rate; the sympathetic branch speeds it up, the parasympathetic slows it down. Here you see an EKG, the electrical signal generated with each heart beat. While cardiologists can glean much information from these signals, what we want to look at is the interval between beats. Are these beats speeding up or slowing down? Because the intervals are decreasing, this series of beats is increasing in heart rate. Transition : When we track these beat to beat changes over time, and plot the time intervals between the beats, we see a pattern; the pattern of our heart rhythms. y
  • Here we’re looking at about 24 seconds of heartbeats. The interval between each beat is plotted and when the dots are connected, you see the pattern of variability. Based on what you learned about the ANS, the up slope represents increased sympathetic activity…the gas pedal so to speak. And the down slope, parasympathetic activity, the brake. And the top trace shows the pattern of variability. It’s important to know that having a lot of variability, a wide range, is actually very good. The amount of our HRV is related to our age, with younger people having higher levels of HRV than older people. HRV is also an important indicator of both physiological resilience and behavioral flexibility, and reflects our capacity to adapt effectively to stress. That’s a very important point – that your heart’s variability is related to both your resilience and your behavioral flexibility. Additionally, low HRV reflects the effects of stress related depletion on the autonomic nervous system and is associated with health challenges. Transition : That’s because emotions have a profound impact on HRV. y
  • This is real-time data plotting the pulse rate (y axis) over time (x axis). The time between heart beats is measured and extrapolated to plot the beat to beat changes in heart rate or HRV. Each up slope is a series of heart beats increasing in rate, indicating increased sympathetic activity. Each down slope, indicates parasympathetic activity slowing the heart down. Emotions have a profound impact on HRV. Both traces are from the same person and the change occurred within seconds when s/he changed the emotional state. In essence these two graphs, offer a visual image of the difference between being on the left or right sides of the Emotional Landscape. More importantly they show the difference right down to the biological level between stress and resilience. A negative emotion, like frustration used here, generates a chaotic, “earthquake” type pattern which means these two branches of the ANS are out of sync and fighting each other. It's like driving car with feet on accelerator & brake at same time -stop/start. On the other hand, a positive emotional state (here it was appreciation) creates a smooth rolling trace or sinusoidal curve. Both ANS branches are in sync. Place an incoherent wave trace on the bottom right side of the emotional landscape and a coherent one on the left. Transition: We call this type of pattern coherence. z
  • Animated Slide Emotions fuel the hormonal response. Negative emotions increase cortisol levels; positive emotions increase DHEA levels. An interesting fact about this hormonal response is that while it, too, is fast-acting, it’s not as fast as the ANS response. Slower to act means these hormones hang around in your bloodstream for a longer period of time--- half life for cortisol and DHEA is about 13 hours!-- than chemicals triggered as part of the ANS response, like adrenaline. This is a good thing when it’s DHEA, but not when it’s excessive amounts of cortisol, which tends to depress our moods and sense of hope. And we’ve all experienced days when one tough situation is followed by another, etc. And before we know it the whole day goes south because we’re in the middle of this vicious cycle. But, when we feel good about what we’re doing, like at the end of a good day, DHEA levels increase. Increased levels of DHEA instill a sense of well being which spill over into the next situation and we have a good day. Now we’re in this virtuous cycle. The chemistry of peak moments! Back on the prairie when Fred defeated the tiger and brought the bounty back to the tribe, everyone celebrated. Celebration evokes positive emotions. This helped counter-balance the cortisol elevations naturally. Today, when you survive the freeway, however, who’s celebrating? Instead, you show up at work only to face more tigers disguised as new polices, tough customers or irritating co workers. The build-up of cortisol explains why it’s hard to shift gears after a tough day at work or even on the beach in Maui. Some of the most balanced people – those least affected by the same stressors that have their colleagues on edge – are the ones who regularly appreciate the good things in their life. This positive feeling changes the underlying physiology, which in turn helps their view of life remain more positive. This doesn’t mean you should run out to the health food store and buy DHEA tablets to improve your relationships and performance; that can be dangerous. Taking excessive DHEA tablets can lead to a beard and acne in women and in men can promote prostate cancer. Plus if the body thinks you don’t need DHEA it stops making it.  That can be dangerous. DHEA is a banned substance in Olympics because it is a performance enhancer. Transition: Rather, you can change your bio chemistry naturally so that it builds resilience. And you’ll learn just how a little later. For now let’s put these two systems together… s
  • NOTE: Script is in normal font. Trainer instructions are in italics. Some slides build and are so marked as ‘Animated Slide’ which will require you click throughout the script to reveal all information on the slide. Introduction; ice breakers, etc. In this program I’ll have the honor of teaching you easy to use, effective and scientifically validated techniques that will make a difference in your personal and professional life. I wanted you to know that all the HeartMath tools and techniques you’ll be learning have been part of my life. Tell your story: how the HeartMath ® System has benefited you; how your life has gotten better; more specifically an example of how HeartMath has helped you be more resilient. We all know about stress; there may even be some in the room who believe that if we were to look up stress in the dictionary, we would find your picture next to the definition. But what do we know about resilience? When I consider people who demonstrate resilience, I remember all those Charles Dickens characters,: Oliver Twist, David Copperfield, Pip, Little Dorrit… who overcame hardships. Even in the face of tremendous obstacles they were able to find the strength to move on. What qualities do resilient people possess that not only gets them through the tough times, but allows them to thrive? It’s as if when they get to the mountain, rather than struggle to get around it, they climb to the top and glory in the beauty they see. What are those qualities? How does that show up, mentally, emotionally and physically? List on flip chart (f/c). Expand the list, through questioning, to include words that describe mental, emotional and physical aspects of resilience. Tip: The purpose of this activity is to define resilience as the group experiences it. This also sets the stage for defining the goals of the workshop in terms that are relevant to each person. Later, throughout the workshop, facilitate the group’s understanding that the same qualities of resilience they describe are the same thoughts, feelings and physical aspects of coherence. Transition: How about you? HeartMath, Freeze-Frame and Heart Lock-in are registered trademarks of the Institute of HeartMath. Quick Coherence is a registered trademark of Doc Childre. emWave and Personal Stress Reliever are registered trademarks of Quantum Intech, Inc. a
  • Transforming Stress into Resilience Workshop Trainer’s Notes ©2009 HeartMath t
  • Show of hands: How many of you are as physically active as you would like to be? How many of you would like to be more physically active than you are How many of you do regular formal exercise / training How many enjoy formal exercise / sports / activities
  • Show of hands: How many of you are as physically active as you would like to be? How many of you would like to be more physically active than you are How many of you do regular formal exercise / training How many enjoy formal exercise / sports / activities
  • Show of hands: How many of you are as physically active as you would like to be? How many of you would like to be more physically active than you are How many of you do regular formal exercise / training How many enjoy formal exercise / sports / activities
  • CIPD Stress slides Nov 24th

    1. 1. ‘ Hard-wired for hard times’ ‘ Stress At Work – the organisation, the person and the legal requirements’ CIPD Conference, Peterborough 24 th November 2011 Guy Longshaw Guy Longshaw Wellbeing and Performance Consulting Career and Business Coaching Workplace Mediation
    2. 2. Agenda <ul><li>Introductions – who are we? </li></ul><ul><li>Think about stress management in your organisation and get an idea what others are doing </li></ul><ul><li>How and Why are we ‘Hard-wired for hard times’ and how do our hearts and brains interact? (and ‘So what?’…) </li></ul><ul><li>Share some simple tools and techniques for you personally and perhaps for your colleagues </li></ul>
    3. 3. Proactive wellbeing in organisations… <ul><li>Employee Assistance Programmes (EAP’s) </li></ul><ul><li>Leadership and Management training programmes – stress management / resilience / energy management / mindfulness (workshops, 1:1, on-line) </li></ul><ul><li>Awareness sessions, intranet information, internal comms initiatives </li></ul><ul><li>‘ Healthy eating’ options </li></ul><ul><li>Fruit and ‘low GI’ snacks in meetings </li></ul><ul><li>Gym membership discounts / free gyms on site </li></ul><ul><li>Walking clubs / competitions </li></ul><ul><li>Sponsored team active events </li></ul><ul><li>Sports / social clubs </li></ul><ul><li>Leaders leading by example </li></ul><ul><li>Work-life balance champions </li></ul><ul><li>A real commitment to excellence in people management(!) </li></ul><ul><li>And..? What else? </li></ul>
    4. 4. A model of Resilience Personality (strengths and vulnerabilities) Proactive coping Sources of pressure Resilience Stress
    5. 5. Pressure, coping, resilience, energy… <ul><li>A simple model of resilience </li></ul><ul><li>Four dimensions of personal energy </li></ul><ul><li>Three common ways of dealing with pressure: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1: Overindulgence (aka avoidance) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2: Self-care (exercise, diet, relaxation, sleep, me-time, WLB etc) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>3: Changing our: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Attitude </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Perspective </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Point of view </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Focus of attention </li></ul></ul></ul>How we ‘perceive’ things What we choose to ‘attend to’
    6. 6. ‘ Hard-wired for hard times…’ Thalamus Behaviour Physiology Immunology Cortex Amygdala
    7. 7. The stress response: ‘false alarm’? Thalamus Behaviour Physiology Immunology Cortex Amygdala What are your ‘false alarms’?
    8. 8. Personal energy audit <ul><li>Mark Twain quote on trauma </li></ul><ul><li>Our mind translates our experience of the world into happiness or suffering </li></ul><ul><li>It can be our best friend or our worst enemy </li></ul><ul><li>My energy audit exercise </li></ul><ul><li>Take 5 mins to complete, then a few mins discussion… </li></ul>
    9. 9. The Heart Brain Relationship <ul><li>The heart has its own complex nervous system – the “Heart Brain”. </li></ul><ul><li>The heart sends far more information to the brain than the brain sends to the heart. </li></ul><ul><li>The heart signals especially affect the brain centers involved in decision- making, creativity and emotional experience. </li></ul><ul><li>The heart ‘communicates’ through nerves and physically and through hormones and electromagnetically </li></ul><ul><li>It is the ‘clock with the biggest pendulum’ </li></ul>The role of the heart…
    10. 10. Heart Rate Variability (HRV) 0.859 sec. 0.793 sec. 0.726 sec. 70 BPM 76 BPM 83 BPM The role of the heart…
    11. 11. HEART RATE (BPM) Seconds HRV = The Heart Rhythm 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24
    12. 12. FRUSTRATION HEART RATE HEART RATE TIME (SECONDS) Heart Rhythms 100 – 90 – 80 – 70 – 60 – 50 – 100 – 90 – 80 – 70 – 60 – 50 – 1 50 100 150 200 APPRECIATION
    13. 13. Why bright people do stupid things… Cortical inhibition: Cortical facilitation: Increased amygdala activity Decreased amygdala activity Decreased cortex activity Increased cortex activity [c.HeartMath and The Authentic Organisation]
    14. 14. DHEA cortisol Positive Emotion Negative Emotion Vicious Cycle The Chemistry of Resilience Submission/despair Virtuous Cycle Success/well being
    15. 15. High Cortisol vs Low DHEA correlations <ul><li>Accelerated aging  (Kerr et al., 1991; Namiki, 1994) </li></ul><ul><li>Brain cell death  (Kerr et al., 1991; Sapolsky, 1992) </li></ul><ul><li>Impaired memory and learning  (Kerr et al., 1991; Sapolsky, 1992) </li></ul><ul><li>Decreased bone density; increased osteoporosis  (Manolagas, 1979) </li></ul><ul><li>Reduced muscle mass  (Beme, 1993) </li></ul><ul><li>Reduced skin growth and regeneration  (Beme, 1993) </li></ul><ul><li>Impaired immune function  (Hiemke, 1994) </li></ul><ul><li>Increased blood sugar  (DeFeo, 1989) </li></ul><ul><li>Increased fat accumulation around waist and hips (Marin, 1992) </li></ul><ul><li>Obesity (Marin 1992) </li></ul><ul><li>Diabetes (Nestler 1992) </li></ul><ul><li>Hypertension (Shafagoj 1992) </li></ul><ul><li>Heart Disease (Barrett-Connor 1986) </li></ul><ul><li>Cancer (Bhatavdekar 1994) </li></ul><ul><li>Alzheimer’s (Nasman 1995) </li></ul><ul><li>[HeartMath] </li></ul>
    16. 16. ©HeartMath 2009 Less this and more this!
    17. 17. Sympathetic High Heart Rate / Challenge Stress Resilience Low Heart Rate / Relaxation Parasympathetic Negative Emotion Positive Emotion LOW PERFORMANCE cortisol DHEA ©HeartMath 2009 & The Authentic Organisation 2010 Frustrated Angry Panicked Tense Defensive Fearful Anxious Loss of interest Cynical Depressed Exhausted Defeated Hopeless Sad Dynamic Passionate Engaged Connected Hopeful Aligned Energised Cool under pressure In “flow” Contented Relieved Mellow Relaxed Peaceful The emotional landscape
    18. 18. Emotional landscape audit… <ul><li>AT WORK what percentages of your time do you spend in each quadrant? </li></ul><ul><li>AT HOME what percentages of your time do you spend in each quadrant? </li></ul><ul><li>So what? What’s behind these differences? Which things do you have some control over? </li></ul><ul><li>Discuss… </li></ul>
    19. 19. Back to your energy audit (bucket)… <ul><li>NOW – revisit your personal energy audit: </li></ul><ul><li>On the PLUS (+) side: what could you do more of / more effectively and what else could you do in addition on this side? </li></ul><ul><li>On the MINUS (-) side: which small holes can you ‘fix’ completely? What can you do to ‘slow the flow’ out of the bigger holes </li></ul><ul><li>[HINTS: 1. less overindulging? 2. more self-care? 3. change how you ‘look at’ things / what you choose to ‘look at’?] </li></ul><ul><li>FEEDBACK… </li></ul><ul><li>Tip: Awareness is key for energy management. How’s my energy level? Why? Which dimension? </li></ul>
    20. 20. Example content for stress management / personal resilience programmes <ul><li>This stuff and… </li></ul><ul><li>Breathing </li></ul><ul><li>Creative visualisation </li></ul><ul><li>Mindfulness </li></ul><ul><li>Aligning values – personal / corporate </li></ul><ul><li>Positive psychology…eg strengths, PERMA, ABC, optimism etc etc </li></ul><ul><li>Energy management – awareness and tools in all four dimensions; physical, emotional, mental, spiritual. 1:1 coaching… </li></ul><ul><li>Overall – ‘ASTARS’: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Awareness </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Simple Tools </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Actions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Resolve </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sustainability </li></ul></ul>
    21. 21. Thanks Guy Longshaw - Wellbeing and Performance Consulting - Career and Business Coaching - Workplace Mediation [email_address] - 07525 021878 - http://uk.linkedin.com/in/guylongshaw

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