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Basic house designs

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  • 1. Basic House Design 1© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 2. PowerPoint PresentationPublisherThe Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.Tinley Park, Illinois 2© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 3. Chapter 2 Basic House Designs 3© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 4. Chapter 2 Overview • Introduction • One-Story Ranch Designs • One-and-One-Half-Story Designs • Two-Story Designs • Split-Level Designs • Variations of the Split-Level Design • Traffic Circulation 4© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 5. Learning Objectives • List the four basic house designs. • Explain the chief advantages of each house design. • List disadvantages of each house design. • Explain traffic circulation in a floor plan. 5© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 6. Introduction • A residential home designer has four basic designs from which to choose: – One-story ranch. – One-and-one-half-story. – Two-story. – Split-level. • Each style has strengths and weaknesses. (continued) 6© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 7. Introduction • Several factors should play a role in the final decision in choosing a basic design: – Space available for the house. – Site contour and surroundings. – Climate. – Convenience and cost. – Personal preference and needs. 7© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 8. One-Story Ranch Designs • The one-story ranch style house has all the regular living space on one level. • It may have a basement, crawl space, or slab floor. • One of the chief advantages is that it lends itself to indoor-outdoor living. • Patios, porches, and terraces can be added off most any room. (continued) 8© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 9. One-Story Ranch Designs • One of the many style variations for a typical one-story ranch house. (continued) (Ken Hawk) 9© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 10. One-Story Ranch Designs • Another advantage of this design is the absence of stairs where there is no basement. • The ranch is popular with older and handicapped people. • Usually has a low-pitched roof with wide overhangs. • Short walls make outside maintenance easy. (continued) 10© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 11. One-Story Ranch Designs • The quality of this outdoor space greatly enhances the living area of the home. (The Oshkosh, WI private residence of Chancellor Richard (continued) H. Wells and family—formerly the Alberta Kimball Home) 11© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 12. One-Story Ranch Designs • This modern variation of the basic ranch design minimizes height problems in construction. (continued) 12© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 13. One-Story Ranch Designs • This computer-generated rendering shows a large ranch house that combines simplified construction and minimal maintenance. (continued) (Helmuth A. Geiser, Member AIBD) 13© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 14. One-Story Ranch Designs • Low height simplifies construction. • The low and long appearance of the ranch is pleasing to most people. • A great number of variations are possible. • The ranch easily lends itself to expansion and modification. • A ranch house usually costs more to build than other designs of the same square footage. 14 (continued)© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 15. One-Story Ranch Designs • The long, low design of this ranch home in Florida is attractive to most people. 15© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 16. One-Story Ranch Designs • Ranch design with a full basement. (continued) 16© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 17. One-Story Ranch Designs • Ranch design with a crawl space. (continued) 17© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 18. One-Story Ranch Designs • Ranch design with slab construction. (continued) 18© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 19. One-Story Ranch Designs • The ranch generally requires a larger lot than other house designs. • The large “footprint” can cause heating problems for certain areas of the house because of distance from the furnace. • Sometimes two furnaces or air conditioners may be required. (continued) 19© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 20. One-Story Ranch Designs • Maintenance costs may be more on a ranch because of the large roof and exterior wall surfaces. • Considerable hall space may be required in a large ranch style house. • Careful planning should be done to keep hall space to a minimum. (continued) 20© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 21. One-Story Ranch Designs • This spacious ranch house has extensive roof and wall areas that may produce maintenance problems. (continued) 21© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 22. One-Story Ranch Designs • An excessive amount of hall space is required to make this ranch design serviceable. 22© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 23. One-and-One-Half-Story Designs • The one-and-one-half-story design is sometimes called a Cape Cod. • It has one-story with an expanded attic. • It usually has dormers for additional light and ventilation. • Economical to build. • Built-in expandability in the attic—about 1/2 the floor space of the first floor. (continued) 23© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 24. One-and-One-Half-Story Designs • Typical one-and- one-half-story house. (continued) 24© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 25. One-and-One-Half-Story Designs (Photo Courtesy of James Hardie® Siding Products) 25© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 26. One-and-One-Half-Story Designs • Additional costs to build a one-and-one- half-story house result from dormers, stairs, and a slightly steeper roof. • This design is quite versatile. • A minimal house will have two bedrooms, one bath, and an unfinished attic. (continued) 26© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 27. One-and-One-Half-Story Designs • Heating costs are minimized due to the small outside wall area. • The electrical and plumbing systems should be planned with expansion in mind. 27© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 28. Two-Story Designs • The two-story house is more economical to build than a one-story. • Requires a smaller lot due to the smaller roof and foundation area. • May be built with a basement, crawl space, or on a slab. • Heating is simple and comparatively economical—heat rises naturally to the second floor. (continued) 28© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 29. Two-Story Designs • A section view of a typical two-story house with a basement. (continued) 29© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 30. Two-Story Designs • An attractive traditional two-story house that fits comfortably on a small lot. (continued) 30© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 31. Two-Story Designs • Ventilation is easy and effective with an ample number of windows. • The popularity of two-story houses varies from location to location. • Exterior maintenance is usually more difficult and costly for a two-story house because of height. • Stairs are a problem for some people. (continued) 31© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 32. Two-Story Designs • Two-story houses like this one were once very common throughout the midwestern states. (continued) (Shouldice) 32© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 33. Two-Story Designs • This basic two-story house has a contemporary appearance. (continued) (Photo Courtesy of James Hardie Siding Products) ® 33© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 34. Two-Story Designs • The two-story does not lend itself to variations in style as well as some other designs. • Architects have added a contemporary flair and, therefore, improved the overall appearance and demand for two-story houses. 34© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 35. Split-Level Designs • The split-level design was developed for a sloping or hilly lot to take advantage of a troublesome difference in elevation. • As a general rule, a split-level house should not be built on a flat lot. • The split-level makes efficient use of space and has little hall space. • Sleeping, living, and recreation areas are separated on different levels. 35 (continued)© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 36. Split-Level Designs • This split-level house illustrates the standard arrangement of living levels. (continued) 36© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 37. Split-Level Designs • Arrangement of a four-level house. (continued) 37© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 38. Split-Level Designs • The lowest level of the house is usually the basement level. – Contains the heating and cooling equipment, storage, and shop or laundry. – This level is generally about 40% to 60% of the house “footprint.” • The next level up is the intermediate level—garage and recreation area. 38 (continued)© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 39. Split-Level Designs • The intermediate level is at ground level. • Patios and terraces may be attached to the recreation area. • The intermediate level may also have a foyer, utility room, or family room. • Slightly higher than the intermediate level is the living level. • This level is at ground level also; the sloping grade makes this possible. 39 (continued)© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 40. Split-Level Designs • The kitchen, dining room, living room, and full or 1/2 bath are generally located on the living level. • The foyer, utility, and laundry may also be located on this level, if preferred. • At the highest level of the house is the sleeping level—bedrooms and bath. (continued) 40© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 41. Split-Level Designs • Split-level houses do have some negative aspects: – Generally more expensive to build than a two-story house. – Heating may be a problem if not handled properly; zoning will solve the problem. – Providing access to the different levels for an older or handicapped person is costly. 41© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 42. Variations of the Split-Level • There are three basic variations of the split-level design: – Side-by-side. – Front-to-back. – Back-to-front. • The choice of variation depends on the grade or slope of the lot. (continued) 42© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 43. Variations of the Split-Level • Side-by-Side Design – For lots sloping to the right or left. • Front-to-Back Design – For lots high in front and low in back. • Back-to-Front Design – For lots low in front and high in back. • Traditional Split-Level Design – Split entry between levels. – Raised basement on flat site. 43© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 44. Split-Level Design Variation • Side-by-side split-level house. (continued) 44© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 45. Split-Level Design Variation • Front-to-back split-level house. (continued) 45© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 46. Split-Level Design Variation • Back-to-front split-level house. (continued) 46© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 47. Split-Level Design Variation • Traditional split-level design with split entry. (Alside) 47© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 48. Traffic Circulation • A primary consideration in designing a functional plan is traffic circulation. • Circulation should be planned for efficiency of movement. – Travel should be short and not pass through other rooms. – Distance from garage to kitchen should be short and direct. – Foyer should be centrally located. – Bedrooms should be close to a bath. (continued) 48© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 49. Traffic Circulation • This arrangement provides for good traffic circulation. 49© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 50. Glossary • Basement. The lowest level of the house that is mostly below the grade level. • Intermediate Level. The next level up from the basement in a split-level design. • Living Level. The next level up from the intermediate level in a split-level design. • One-and-One-Half Story. A house design that is basically a one-story house with a steeper roof for expansion of the attic. 50© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 51. Glossary • One-Story Ranch. A house design that has all regular living space on one level. • Sleeping Level. The highest elevation in a split-level house design. • Split-Level. A house design developed to solve the problem of a sloping site by shifting floor level areas to accommodate the site. • Traffic Circulation. The movement of people from one area or room to another. 51© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only
  • 52. Glossary • Two-Story. A house design that has living space on two full levels. 52© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only

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