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From Meatspace to Social Virtual Reality

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As an assistant professor I lead weeklong workshops at various design, architecture, and business schools, guiding students through the creative process from ideation to running prototype ready to be …

As an assistant professor I lead weeklong workshops at various design, architecture, and business schools, guiding students through the creative process from ideation to running prototype ready to be pitched to different stakeholders. The course covers a range of content from ideation techniques and rating, business- model prototyping, competitor analysis and differentiation, paper prototyping to lean design techniques and Pecha Kucha-style presentations.

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  • 1. INTERFACES FROM MEATSPACE TO SOCIAL VIRTUAL REALITY
  • 2. CF. URBAN DICTIONARY Meatspace ”noun. a term, originating from cyberpunk fiction and culture, referring to the real (that is, not virtual) world, the world of flesh and blood. somewhat tongue-in-cheek. the opposite of cyberspace.”
  • 3. HISTORICAL PROGENITORS
 CYBERNETICS 3
  • 4. NORBERT WIENER 1949
  • 5. WIKIPEDIA “Wiener defined cybernetics in 1948 as ’the scientific study of control and communication in the animal and the machine.’ The word ’cybernetics’ comes from the Greek word κυβερνητική (kyverni ̱tikí ̱, ’government’), i.e. all that are pertinent to κυβερνώ (kyvernó̱), the latter meaning to ’steer,’ ’navigate’ or ’govern,’ hence κυβέρνησις (kyvérni ̱sis, ’government’) is the government while κυβερνήτης (kyverní ̱ti ̱s) is the governor or the captain.”
  • 6. WIKIPEDIA “Wiener defined cybernetics in 1948 as ’the scientific study of control and communication in the animal and the machine.’ The word ’cybernetics’ comes from the Greek word κυβερνητική (kyverni ̱tikí ̱, ’government’), i.e. all that are pertinent to κυβερνώ (kyvernó̱), the latter meaning to ’steer,’ ’navigate’ or ’govern,’ hence κυβέρνησις (kyvérni ̱sis, ’government’) is the government while κυβερνήτης (kyverní ̱ti ̱s) is the governor or the captain.”
  • 7. “Contemporary cybernetics began as an interdisciplinary study connecting the fields of control systems, electrical network theory, mechanical engineering, logic modeling, evolutionary biology, neuroscience, anthropology, and psychology in the 1940s, often attributed to the Macy Conferences. During the second half of the 20th century cybernetics evolved in ways that distinguish first- order cybernetics (about observed systems) from second-order cybernetics (about observing systems)” WIKIPEDIA
  • 8. “Contemporary cybernetics began as an interdisciplinary study connecting the fields of control systems, electrical network theory, mechanical engineering, logic modeling, evolutionary biology, neuroscience, anthropology, and psychology in the 1940s, often attributed to the Macy Conferences. During the second half of the 20th century cybernetics evolved in ways that distinguish first- order cybernetics (about observed systems) from second-order cybernetics (about observing systems)” WIKIPEDIA
  • 9. 1953 MACY CONFERENCE 1953
  • 10. HISTORICAL PROGENITORS
 CYBERSPACE & ITS INFLUENCE 10
  • 11. DEFINITION & INFLUENCES “Cyberspace” is a term created by William Gibson in his fantasy novel Neuromancer to describe the “world” of computers, and the society that gathers around them. Gibson’s fantasy of a world of connected computers has moved into a present reality in the form of the Internet. In cyberspace people are met electronically, without a face or body. As Gibson mentioned some of his influences were excerpts from Burroughs’ Naked Lunch, which first ”made no sense to him at all” or as he said ”like reading messages from Mars”.
  • 12. DEFINITION & INFLUENCES “Cyberspace” is a term created by William Gibson in his fantasy novel Neuromancer to describe the “world” of computers, and the society that gathers around them. Gibson’s fantasy of a world of connected computers has moved into a present reality in the form of the Internet. In cyberspace people are met electronically, without a face or body. As Gibson mentioned some of his influences were excerpts from Burroughs’ Naked Lunch, which first ”made no sense to him at all” or as he said ”like reading messages from Mars”.
  • 13. WILLIAM S. BURROUGHS 1914, 1997* †
  • 14. TIMOTHY LEARY 1920, 1996* †
  • 15. PAT CADIGAN (MINDPLAYERS) "One morning in 1979, I was getting ready for work and Gary Numan’s ’Cars’ came on the radio. Afterwards, the DJ said, ’There’s some cyberpunk for you.’ He was making a joke; in 1979, the punk movement was in full flower but the chaotic noise of punk music was starting to evolve into electronic noise."
  • 16. THE EARLY 80S The popularity of the film Bladerunner and William Gibson’s novel Neuromancer accelerated the term cyberpunk. Authors like Cadigan, Bruce Sterling and Rudy Rucker were only a few of the pioneers which created worlds where humans and computers merge.
  • 17. THE 1990S Back in the 80s the term cyber was more or less related to the underground. Though in the 1990s more and more people got internet access so that an utopian vision changed towards a “household consumer item“. This led to the creation of terms like ”cyber-bull”, ”cybercommunity”, ”cybergeek”, ”cyberlaw”, ”cyberstalker” as well as ”cybersex” and ”cyberwar”. Shortly… everything turned ”cyber” out of a sudden.
  • 18. VIRTUAL REALITY
 LAYERS OF REALITY 26
  • 19. REAL ENVIRONMENT
 (MEATSPACE) AUGMENTED REALITY (AR) AUGMENTED VIRTUALITY (AV) VIRTUAL REALITY (VR)> > > ! LAYERS OF (VIRTUAL) WORLDS CF. KZERO
  • 20. REAL ENVIRONMENT
 (MEATSPACE) AUGMENTED REALITY (AR) AUGMENTED VIRTUALITY (AV) VIRTUAL REALITY (VR)> > > ! LAYERS OF (VIRTUAL) WORLDS SPATIAL REAL WORLD MIXED REALITY IMMERSIVE VIRTUAL WORLD CF. KZERO
  • 21. FIRST WAVE ‣ A real-time multi-user virtual environment that can not be altered by the user ‣ Probably social networking before ”social networks” ‣ Target group are mainly Kids, Tween and Teen (KT&T) ‣ Primarily 2.5D accessed via web-browser. ‣ Examples are Club Pengiun, Moshi Monsters, Wizard 101, Neopets, Habbo but also ”Branded Virtual Worlds” like Monkey Quest or Playstation Home. CF. KZERO
  • 22. SECOND WAVE ‣ A Virtual World that allows the user to create/modify their environment (”Come and play in my world.”) ‣ Mix of 2.5D and 3D accessed via web browser and tablet with mix of third and first person view. ‣ Examples are Second Life, IMVU, Stardoll, Minecraft, Roblox etc. CF. KZERO
  • 23. PHILIP ROSEDALE
  • 24. MARKUS PERSSON NOTCH
  • 25. DEFINITION OF MIRROR WORLDS A Mirror World is a virtual world based on a real-life place – a digital re-creation of an existing landmark, building, region or even an entire country. They offer a utalitarian software model of real human environments and their workings.
  • 26. GAME OF THRONES
 REBUILT IN MINECRAFT
  • 27. GOOGLE EARTH
  • 28. JOHANNESBURG STADION
 REBUILT IN GOOGLE EARTH
  • 29. INTERCONNECTING VIRTUAL WORLDS The current virtual worlds find themselves in a situation akin to that of BBS systems in the 1980s and 1990s vis-à-vis the Internet. There are indeed similarities between Web browsing and virtual world navigation. Though what is still missing is a standardized protocol submitted to standard committees such as IETC, W3C etc.. The shown examples play with the possibilities of interconnection.
  • 30. IBM PATENT (2008)
  • 31. ME TEACHING IN SECOND LIFE (2006)
  • 32. PRESENTATION INTEGRATED INTO THE VIRTUAL WORLD
  • 33. EXAMPLE FOR A 
 MIRRORWORLD
  • 34. WEKNOW PLANNING WOW RAIDS IN SECOND LIFE
  • 35. THIRD WAVE ‣ A virtual world experienced in virtual reality. ‣ Three main applications: ‣ Social Virtual Reality (a key reason for the Facebook 
 acquisition of Oculus VR). ‣ User Generated Spaces (UGS). ‣ Branded Virtual Reality. CF. KZERO
  • 36. KEY DRIVER “PRESENCE“ ‣ How ‘real it feels’ to the user. The more real it feels the more time 
 a user will spend in-world ‣ Does it feel they are ‘in’ the environment or controlling remotely. ‣ Presence creates an emotive and experiential bond. CF. KZERO
  • 37. KEY DRIVER “SELF-EXPRESSION“ ‣ How a user is able to express themselves in the virtual environment. ‣ UGC created by the user for the user and/or other users. ‣ Synchronous communication with other users. ‣ Self-Expression creates a sense of ownership and curation. CF. KZERO
  • 38. SOCIAL VIRTUAL REALITY ‣ Simply means all the attributes and features of Virtual Worlds as we know them today, with the added element of presence. ‣ The ability to experience a real-time multi-user virtual environment with other people. ‣ This is the next evolution of social networking, moving from asynchronous interaction to fully synchronous. ‣ Chat rooms with the user actually ‘inside’ the room. ‣ A key reason for the Facebook acquisition of Oculus VR. ‣ Oculus CEO Brendan Iribe: “This is going to be an MMO where we want to put 1 billion people in VR.” CF. KZERO
  • 39. USER GENERATED SPACES ‣ Taking the popularity of UGC Virtual Worlds such as Second Life and Minecraft and creating virtual reality equivalents. ‣ The ability for users to create their own virtual surroundings and objects, then interact with them alone or with friends. ‣ This will be a category driven initially by tweens and teens. CF. KZERO
  • 40. MAIL@AXELQUACK.DE WWW.AXELQUACK.DE