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Martin Luther King’s ‘I Have A Dream’ speech and the March on Washington
 

Martin Luther King’s ‘I Have A Dream’ speech and the March on Washington

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  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
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  • Hace falta muchos hombres como este para llegar a conseguir todo lo que se persigue, y aunque se haya avanzado muchisimo, creo que queda todavia mas de lo avanzado. Salu222
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  • Espetacular trabalho!
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  • Un gran trabajo de Guimera que,como siempre,hace honor a su
    espiritualidad ponderando con vívidas fotografías,todas,porque ella
    lo logra con su talento,las entregas de un ser en bien de la
    humanidad,que se siente honrada por quien supo que significa
    ser un hombre de bien,sea cual fuera su origen.
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  • Fantásticas fotografías Guimera, cuanto sudaron y pelearon por sus derechos y ahora no es que estén de maravilla pero no es aquella bestialidad. Felicitaciones
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  • Es tan iimportante este hombre en nuestra historia contemporánea!!

    y forzó a cambiar tantas actitudes!!! que no podemos olvidarle jamás

    Precioso recordatorio. Muchas gracias Olga y Muchos besos.
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    Martin Luther King’s ‘I Have A Dream’ speech and the March on Washington Martin Luther King’s ‘I Have A Dream’ speech and the March on Washington Presentation Transcript

    • Martin Luther King’s ‘I Have A Dream’ speech and the March on Washington August 28, 1963: More than 200,000 people gathered around the Lincoln Memorial in Washington DC, where the historic “March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom” culminated with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s ‘I Have A Dream’ speech. King said the march was “the greatest demonstration of freedom in the history of the United States.” The mass demonstration led to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.
    • In this Aug. 28, 1963 file photo, the top of the Washington Monument and part of a U.S. flag are reflected in the sunglasses of Austin Clinton Brown, 9, of Gainesville, Ga., as he poses at the Capitol where he joins others in the March on Washington. (AP Photo)
    • This is a view of the March on Washington crowd made from behind the statue of Abraham Lincoln in the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, August 28, 1963. In the distance is the Washington Monument and the Reflecting Pool. (AP Photo)
    • American actor Marlon Brando (1924 - 2004) stands with his arm around poet James Baldwin, surrounded by actors Charlton Heston (L), Harry Belafonte and others gathered at the Lincoln Memorial during the Civil Rights March on Washington, D.C., August 28, 1963. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
    • Officers hold back the crowd as a woman is calmed by military police during at the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, Washington DC, August 28, 1963. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
    • To pass the long morning, young women clap and sing along to a freedom song between speeches at the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, Washington DC, August 28, 1963. (Photo by Express Newspapers/L360/Getty Images)
    • The clergyman and civil rights leader Martin Luther KIng (C) and other black and white civil right leaders march 28 August 1963 on the Mall in Washington DC during the "March on Washington". King said the march was "the greatest demonstration of freedom in the history of the United States." OFF/AFP/Getty Images
    • With the U.S. Capitol in the background, passengers for charter busses walk along a service roadway of the Mall in Washington, August 28, 1963, to find their transportation home after a civil rights demonstration estimated by police at more than 200,000 people. (AP Photo)
    • NAACP group from Wilmington, N.C., sing in the street near the Washington monument grounds, Aug. 28, 1963 after their arrival to participate in the March on Washington. (AP Photo)
    • The clergyman and civil rights leader Martin Luther KIng (3rd from left) and other black and white civil right leaders march 28 August 1963 on the Mall in Washington DC during the "March on Washington". King said the march was "the greatest demonstration of freedom in the history of the United States." AFP/Getty Images
    • Civil rights march on Washington, D.C. Demonstrators carry signs for equal rights, integrated schools, decent housing, and an end to bias. Aug. 28, 1963. (Warren K. Leffler - Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division)
    • Demonstrators marching in the street holding signs during the March on Washington. Aug. 28, 1963. (Marion S. Trikosko - Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division)
    • Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., third from left, marches in a line of men with arms linked during the March on Washington for civil rights on August 28, 1963. (AP Photo)
    • Standing singers of sit-in songs at the New Haven bus terminal on August 28, 1963 just before their departure for Washington, D.C. to take part in the civil rights march. The songbook was furnished by the Congress of Racial Equality, with co-sponsored the Connecticut contingent of over 3,000 with the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. (AP Photo/Bob Child)
    • 28th August 1963: Over 200,000 people gather around the Lincoln Memorial in Washington DC, where the civil rights March on Washington ended with Martin Luther King's 'I Have A Dream' speech. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
    • In this Aug. 28, 1963 file photo, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., head of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, speaks to thousands during his "I Have a Dream" speech in front of the Lincoln Memorial for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom in Washington. Actor-singer Sammy Davis Jr. is at bottom right. It has been cited as one of America's essential ideals, its language suggestive of a constitutional amendment on equality: People should "not be judged but he color of their skin but by the content of their character." (AP Photo)
    • In this Aug. 28, 1963, black-and-white file photo Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., head of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, addresses marchers during his "I Have a Dream" speech at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington. (AP Photo/File)
    • More than 200,000 civil right militants rather 28 August 1963 on the Mall in Washington DC Washington Monument in background) during the "March on Washington". The civil rights leader Martin Luther King said the march was "the greatest demonstration of freedom in the history of the United States." AFP/AFP/Getty Images
    • Philip Randolph and other civil rights leaders on their way to Congress during the March on Washington. Aug. 28, 1963. (Marion S. Trikosko - Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division)
    • In this Aug. 28, 1963 file photo, President Kennedy stands with a group of leaders of the March on Washington at the White House in Washington. Immediately after the march, they discussed civil rights legislation that was finally inching through Congress. The leaders pressed Kennedy to strengthen the legislation; the president listed many obstacles. Some believe Kennedy preferred to wait until after the 1964 election to push the issue. Yet in his public speeches, he spoke more and more about justice for all.
    • A. Philip Randolph, head of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, talks to newsmen at the Capitol after leader of the March on Washington met with congressional leaders, Aug. 28, 1963. At right is Whitney Young of the National Urban League. (AP Photo)
    • Group of demonstrators stand around casket at Lincoln Memorial in Washington, August 28, 1963. The group carried placards as they pushed the casket down Constitution Avenue during the March on Washington parade. (AP Photo)
    • Marshalls standing by fence near crowd carrying signs, including "Baptist Ministers Conference of Washington & Vicinity" and "We March for First Class Citizenship Now," during the March on Washington. Aug. 28, 1963. (Warren K. Leffler - Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division)
    • A crowd gathers at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, Aug. 28, 1963 to hear speakers in ceremonies following the March on Washington parade through the Capitol streets. (AP Photo)
    • Three members of the Senate make up part of the audience at the Lincoln Memorial ceremonies of the civil rights March on Washington in Washington on August 28, 1963. The senators are, from left: Phillip Hart, D-Mich., Wayne Morse, D-Ore., and William Proxmire, D-Wis. (AP Photo)
    • Army military policemen line up at Washington Monument grounds for duty during the March on Washington, August 28, 1963. In background are some of the early arrivals for the civil rights demonstration. (AP Photo)
    • George Lincoln Rockwell, leader of the Anti-Negro Anti-Jew American Nazi Party, puffs on a corncob pipe as he poses at the Washington Monument, August 28, 1963, Rockwell and about 40 of his followers showed up without customary uniforms in the monument grounds, center of the March on Washington activities. Police denied a parade permit for Rockwell. (AP Photo)
    • Jimmy Walker, a marcher in the March On Washington demonstration from Portland, Ore., right, talks to Roy Wilkins, NAACP leader, as they stand in front of the Lincoln statue at the Lincoln Memorial, Aug. 28, 1963. (AP Photo)
    • Kathleen Johnson of Newark, N.J. gets help from unidentified members of the crowd assembled near the Lincoln Memorial as part of the March On Washington, Aug. 28, 1963. Mrs. Johnson fell into the reflecting pool near the memorial while trying to take a photograph of the area. (AP Photo)
    • A crowd gathers near the reflecting pooll in Washington, Aug. 28, 1963, to hear speakers in ceremonies following the March on Washington parade through the Capitol streets. (AP Photo)
    • View of the huge crowd from the Lincoln Memorial to the Washington Monument, during the March on Washington. Aug. 28, 1963. (Warren K. Leffler - Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division)
    • Actor Marlon Brando, right, poses with his arm around James Baldwin, author and civil rights leader, in front of the Lincoln statue at the Lincoln Memorial, August 28, 1963, during the March on Washington demonstration ceremonies which followed the mass parade. Posing with them are actors Charlton Heston, left, and Harry Belafonte. (AP Photo, FILE)
    • Leonard Freed’s photographs of The March on Washington
    • end cast Martin Luther King’s ‘I Have A Dream’ speech and the March on Washington images credit www. Music John Lennon – Imagine created o.e. thanks for watching