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Sacre Coeur Keynote Dec 10 2009
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Sacre Coeur Keynote Dec 10 2009

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The morning keynote of the Professional Learning day that covered: The 21st Century Teaching & Learning Landscape

The morning keynote of the Professional Learning day that covered: The 21st Century Teaching & Learning Landscape

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  • The new world we live in - things we thought were stable and safe are rather less. What does all this mean for learning? We are entering a new age of learning.
  • Web 2.0 refers to second generation Internet-based services that emphasise online collaboration and sharing among users. Participation is a key feature of Web 2.0. The strengthening role of the user in digital media offers possibilities that are changing not only the Internet, but our society.
  • Web 2.0 refers to second generation Internet-based services that emphasise online collaboration and sharing among users. Participation is a key feature of Web 2.0. The strengthening role of the user in digital media offers possibilities that are changing not only the Internet, but our society.
  • Web 2.0 refers to second generation Internet-based services that emphasise online collaboration and sharing among users. Participation is a key feature of Web 2.0. The strengthening role of the user in digital media offers possibilities that are changing not only the Internet, but our society.
  • Web 2.0 refers to second generation Internet-based services that emphasise online collaboration and sharing among users. Participation is a key feature of Web 2.0. The strengthening role of the user in digital media offers possibilities that are changing not only the Internet, but our society.
  • Web 2.0 refers to second generation Internet-based services that emphasise online collaboration and sharing among users. Participation is a key feature of Web 2.0. The strengthening role of the user in digital media offers possibilities that are changing not only the Internet, but our society.
  • Web 2.0 refers to second generation Internet-based services that emphasise online collaboration and sharing among users. Participation is a key feature of Web 2.0. The strengthening role of the user in digital media offers possibilities that are changing not only the Internet, but our society.
  • What&apos;s important here, is that Web 2.0 transforms the us from users who used to just be a part of &#x201C;the audience&#x201D; who watched those conversations taking place between trusted authorities or authors before in a world of broadcast media, where we are often now immersed in them ourselves. We are able to participate in them - and this is slightly different to interacting or collaborating with them - it&apos;s an important distinction. <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> &#xFFA0;
  • Students need the help of teachers who understand all of this on some personal and practical level. <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> They need teachers who can help them navigate these complex spaces and relationships online that require, at the very least, a different application of traditional skills and literacies.
  • The world is awash with &#x2018;stuff&#x2019; and your ability to critique it, make judgements about it, depends on your ability to construct some of that stuff. If you can construct, you can move towards deconstructing and critiquing it. If you don&#x2019;t you can&#x2019;t and yet many teachers will deconstruct tech apps without having constructed it. Content is no longer King - mutuality and exchange matters now, not the ownership of knowledge - that sense of us and others is turning out to be very important as is sharing and participating - no surprises really, it&#x2019;s something humans have been doing for eons...but now it&#x2019;s happening online.
  • The big change in the &#x2018;real&#x2019; world: cultural, not technological What would education look like if it resembled the culture in which young people live outside the 8.30-3.30 routine of schooling? There is not one education leader who would deny the impact of the Internet, social networking, gaming on the lives of the young people in their charge,yet one is hard pushed to find systemic changes where "their culture" is actively incorporated into "our schools".
  • We need to rethink the delivery and distribution of learning, and do more than use technology to do what we currently do in a different way. Moreover, new technologies are changing how people process information and what they expect to be able to do with that information. Instructional content and supporting information must now be seen as "connective" rather than prescriptive, with students getting info from various sources, places and creating more content and connecting with their peers more in the learning process. For many teachers, this seems "diminishing" or less rigorous, however, the reality is that it can promote a real sense of inquiry in students. The use of wikis, blogs and social networking in young learners leisure time is described as &#x2018;prolific&#x2019; but their use in the classroom is still limited. We need to help learners develop more sophisticated uses of Web 2.0 tech and to give them the skills to navigate this space.
  • Dynamics that have been reconfigured as a result of social media. 1. Invisible Audiences. There are lurkers who are present but whom we cannot see, visitors who access our content at a later date or in a different environment than where we first produced them. Not fully understanding the potential or actual audience. 2. Collapsed Contexts. Some behaviors are appropriate in one context but not another, in front of one audience but not others. Social media brings all of these contexts crashing into one. 3. Blurring of Public and Private. Focus on the properties and dynamics of social media &#x2013; not the tools. Specific genres of social media may come and go, but these underlying properties are here to stay. Technology will continue to leverage social networks as we go forward. One of the key challenges is learning how to adapt to an environment in which these properties and dynamics play a key role. We are all implicated in it. Social media is here to stay. Now we just have to evolve with it.
  • While discussions around ICT in learning are often reduced to focusing on tools, we tend to miss more critical aspects of 21st century technologies and Web 2.0 applications in relation to learning &#x2013; and in particular, their relationship to literacy.
  • While discussions around ICT in learning are often reduced to focusing on tools, we tend to miss more critical aspects of 21st century technologies and Web 2.0 applications in relation to learning &#x2013; and in particular, their relationship to literacy.
  • For some teachers, this seems diminishing or less rigorous, however, the reality is that it can promote a real sense of inquiry in students.
  • For some teachers, this seems diminishing or less rigorous, however, the reality is that it can promote a real sense of inquiry in students.
  • For some teachers, this seems diminishing or less rigorous, however, the reality is that it can promote a real sense of inquiry in students.
  • For some teachers, this seems diminishing or less rigorous, however, the reality is that it can promote a real sense of inquiry in students.
  • For some teachers, this seems diminishing or less rigorous, however, the reality is that it can promote a real sense of inquiry in students.
  • Social media and participatory culture are an integral part of life today and can enrich learning. The majority of young people report using Web 2.0 to communicate about education-related topics. What&#x2019;s standing in the way of more widespread implementation? Despite the case that can be made for the use of Web 2.0 in education at a philosophical level, the issue of if and how Web 2.0 should actually be deployed in schools is problematic. The way in which schools respond to the opportunities and challenges of implementing Web 2.0 in classrooms falls into three categories. The challenge is no longer what we can make the technology do. But what do we want - and this is very different to what we wanted last century in factory schools and economies of scale and wisdom being delivered and a curriculum being received.
  • Social media and participatory culture are an integral part of life today and can enrich learning. The majority of young people report using Web 2.0 to communicate about education-related topics. What&#x2019;s standing in the way of more widespread implementation? Despite the case that can be made for the use of Web 2.0 in education at a philosophical level, the issue of if and how Web 2.0 should actually be deployed in schools is problematic. The way in which schools respond to the opportunities and challenges of implementing Web 2.0 in classrooms falls into three categories. The challenge is no longer what we can make the technology do. But what do we want - and this is very different to what we wanted last century in factory schools and economies of scale and wisdom being delivered and a curriculum being received.
  • Social media and participatory culture are an integral part of life today and can enrich learning. The majority of young people report using Web 2.0 to communicate about education-related topics. What&#x2019;s standing in the way of more widespread implementation? Despite the case that can be made for the use of Web 2.0 in education at a philosophical level, the issue of if and how Web 2.0 should actually be deployed in schools is problematic. The way in which schools respond to the opportunities and challenges of implementing Web 2.0 in classrooms falls into three categories. The challenge is no longer what we can make the technology do. But what do we want - and this is very different to what we wanted last century in factory schools and economies of scale and wisdom being delivered and a curriculum being received.
  • Social media and participatory culture are an integral part of life today and can enrich learning. The majority of young people report using Web 2.0 to communicate about education-related topics. What&#x2019;s standing in the way of more widespread implementation? Despite the case that can be made for the use of Web 2.0 in education at a philosophical level, the issue of if and how Web 2.0 should actually be deployed in schools is problematic. The way in which schools respond to the opportunities and challenges of implementing Web 2.0 in classrooms falls into three categories. The challenge is no longer what we can make the technology do. But what do we want - and this is very different to what we wanted last century in factory schools and economies of scale and wisdom being delivered and a curriculum being received.
  • Social media and participatory culture are an integral part of life today and can enrich learning. The majority of young people report using Web 2.0 to communicate about education-related topics. What&#x2019;s standing in the way of more widespread implementation? Despite the case that can be made for the use of Web 2.0 in education at a philosophical level, the issue of if and how Web 2.0 should actually be deployed in schools is problematic. The way in which schools respond to the opportunities and challenges of implementing Web 2.0 in classrooms falls into three categories. The challenge is no longer what we can make the technology do. But what do we want - and this is very different to what we wanted last century in factory schools and economies of scale and wisdom being delivered and a curriculum being received.
  • Social media and participatory culture are an integral part of life today and can enrich learning. The majority of young people report using Web 2.0 to communicate about education-related topics. What&#x2019;s standing in the way of more widespread implementation? Despite the case that can be made for the use of Web 2.0 in education at a philosophical level, the issue of if and how Web 2.0 should actually be deployed in schools is problematic. The way in which schools respond to the opportunities and challenges of implementing Web 2.0 in classrooms falls into three categories. The challenge is no longer what we can make the technology do. But what do we want - and this is very different to what we wanted last century in factory schools and economies of scale and wisdom being delivered and a curriculum being received.

Sacre Coeur Keynote Dec 10 2009 Sacre Coeur Keynote Dec 10 2009 Presentation Transcript

  • the digital landscape implications for teaching and learning
  • Our values and norms in education are being challenged by a shifting landscape of media and communications in which youth are central actors.
  • buzzwords Social Media gather, communicate, share, collaborate, play Web 2.0 social media tools
  • key words in the internet landscape
  • key words in the internet landscape media
  • key words in the internet landscape media social
  • key words in the internet landscape media social mobile
  • key words in the internet landscape media social mobile real time
  • key words in the internet landscape media social mobile real time convergence
  • digital life
  • digital life
  • digital life
  • digital life
  • digital life
  • digital life
  • digital life
  • digital life
  • digital life
  • virtual spaces MUVEs: multi-user virtual environments Narrative environments : game style worlds Virtual worlds Social & professional networks Sharing & collaborative spaces Aggregation & storage Products & services [e-commerce] Information sources In these spaces, people: // run businesses & engage in e-commerce // live, love & learn // create & construct // play, trade & socialise // make their voices heard
  • web as participatory platform ‘us-ness’ | community | participation
  • what does this mean for us?
  • what does this mean for us?
  • what does this mean for us?
  • what does this mean for us?
  • what does this mean for us?
  • what does this mean for us?
  • so plugged in, yet so disconnected “We [need to] use social media in the classroom not because our students use it, but because we are afraid that social media might be using them – that they are using social media blindly, without recognition of the new challenges and opportunities they might create.” M. Wesch
  • awash with stuff
  • what would education look like if it resembled the culture?
  • current technology demands a totally different approach to instructional design and teaching methodology it requires new skills from both teacher and student
  • social media matters in education What’s important: the properties and dynamics of social media – not the tools – and how to evolve with them.
  • ‘traditional’ literacy “.... being able to read and write in the shared language of a culture.” Futurelab: Digital participation, digital literacy and school subjects 2009
  • digital literacy Being able to access the internet; find, manage and edit digital information; join in communications; and engage with an online information and communications network impact on a person’s potential to communicate and learn.
  • 21st Century Education
  • 21st Century Education Rethinking the who, what, where & when of learning.
  • 21st Century Education Rethinking the who, what, where & when of learning. The delivery & distribution of learning.
  • 21st Century Education Rethinking the who, what, where & when of learning. The delivery & distribution of learning. From prescriptive to connective practices.
  • 21st Century Education Rethinking the who, what, where & when of learning. The delivery & distribution of learning. From prescriptive to connective practices. Who participates in the learning process.
  • 21st Century Education Rethinking the who, what, where & when of learning. The delivery & distribution of learning. From prescriptive to connective practices. Who participates in the learning process. Learning spaces.
  • 21st century competencies
  • 21st century competencies
  • 2009 horizon report Horizon Report: 2009 K-12 Edition http://wp.nmc.org/horizon-k12-2009/
  • 2009 horizon report SHORT TERM HORIZON 1-2 YRS Horizon Report: 2009 K-12 Edition http://wp.nmc.org/horizon-k12-2009/
  • 2009 horizon report SHORT TERM HORIZON 1-2 YRS • collaborative environments • online communication tools Horizon Report: 2009 K-12 Edition http://wp.nmc.org/horizon-k12-2009/
  • 2009 horizon report SHORT TERM HORIZON 1-2 YRS • collaborative environments • online communication tools MID TERM HORIZON 2-3 YRS Horizon Report: 2009 K-12 Edition http://wp.nmc.org/horizon-k12-2009/
  • 2009 horizon report SHORT TERM HORIZON 1-2 YRS • collaborative environments • online communication tools MID TERM HORIZON 2-3 YRS • mobiles • cloud computing Horizon Report: 2009 K-12 Edition http://wp.nmc.org/horizon-k12-2009/
  • 2009 horizon report SHORT TERM HORIZON 1-2 YRS • collaborative environments • online communication tools MID TERM HORIZON 2-3 YRS • mobiles • cloud computing LONG TERM HORIZON 4-5 YRS Horizon Report: 2009 K-12 Edition http://wp.nmc.org/horizon-k12-2009/
  • 2009 horizon report SHORT TERM HORIZON 1-2 YRS • collaborative environments • online communication tools MID TERM HORIZON 2-3 YRS • mobiles • cloud computing LONG TERM HORIZON 4-5 YRS • smart objects • the personal web Horizon Report: 2009 K-12 Edition http://wp.nmc.org/horizon-k12-2009/
  • responding to opportunities & challenges
  • responding to opportunities & challenges Trying to protect students and instructional time by banning Web 2.0 or setting policies to keep it “safe.”
  • responding to opportunities & challenges
  • responding to opportunities & challenges Preserving existing programs and practices by using technology in a way that “fits” into what is already in place.
  • responding to opportunities & challenges
  • responding to opportunities & challenges Taking a progressive approach by allowing technology to transform the organisation rather than moving it faster and further on its existing path.
  • responding to opportunities & challenges
  • Teachers are the learning professionals and catalysts. When you put them in the mix with new technology, you get powerful outcomes.