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00 14092011-0900-derick-de leo

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  • Slide 9 – First we ’ll talk about New Intelligence.
  • Slide 10 – There ’s no question that we are seeing the increasing availability of and demand for information . The volume of digital data is growing at phenomenal rates. We’re expecting it to grow at 57% a year (CAGR – compound annual growth rate) through 2010 (if not beyond). Machine-generated data is spewing out of sensors, RFID, meters, microphones, surveillance systems, GPS systems and all manner of digitally-infused objects. We ’re also seeing an explosive growth in the variety of information . 80% of the new data growth is in unstructured content—with e-mail, images, audio and video making up an increasingly important component of the information a company has at its disposal. And this influx in the volume and variety of information is complicated by the fact that decisions must be made faster than ever before . This is especially true given the rapidly changing business climate, and the importance in understanding past and current performance and planning for the future. Without a doubt, the escalating volume and variety of data streaming across enterprise networks, and the velocity with which decisions must be made, are driving the need for a new kind of intelligence. So what we ’re calling New Intelligence is about gaining control of the information explosion , being able to successfully manage and derive optimal value from the wealth of data and information available to us.
  • Slide 11 – Despite all of the new information at our disposal, less and less information is being effectively captured, managed, analyzed and made available to the people who need it. Important decisions are being made based on gut instinct, rather than actual business intelligence. Executives admit that they are not managing their information effectively, that they don ’t have a view into information from across the value chain, nor do they have the ability to predict future opportunities or threats. 85% of CIOs do not believe that their information is currently well managed 59% do not have access to information across the value chain that would be most useful to them 70% do not get predictions on future opportunities and problems Much of the enterprise ’s intellectual capital is unavailable for real-time correlation or analysis because it is buried in databases tied to specific applications or business units. In many cases, the enterprise has not fully built out or integrated the digital platform of its business. The result: employees spend countless hours each week searching for and reformatting information which decreases in competitive value with each passing moment.
  • Slide 12 – Senior executives want to be able to make better use of their information. It should come as no surprise that they want to use information to improve competitive advantage, to increase revenue and profits and to lower business risk. A survey of 225 business leaders recently conducted by IBM ’s Institute for Business Value supports this. It found that companies that were able to extract and prioritize relevant information performed better financially than companies that were unable to do so. These outperforming companies were also better equipped to apply information to understand risk compared to their peers. [ Source: “Business Analytics and Optimization for the Intelligent Enterprise,” IBM Institute for Business Value, April 2009] The ability to use information and convert it to business intelligence can have a very positive impact on the business. It can improve competitive advantage, revenue and profits by providing companies with the insights to expand the customer base, improve relationships, identify new markets and develop new products and services. It can enable companies to optimize the allocation and deployment of resources to create cost efficiencies that align to business objectives. It can also lower business risk by reducing vulnerability and providing companies with greater certainty in predicting, identifying and responding to threats.
  • Slide 13 - On the flip side, the missed opportunity associated with inaccessible or invalid data or the inability to make sense of it can be considerable , in some cases, astounding. Moreover, deploying new products or business models on the basis of flawed information can have costly consequences. IBM ’s Global CFO Study 2008 found that finance executives who faced information challenges like these reported significantly smaller revenue and stock price growth compared to their better informed peers. These Finance organizations had not taken steps to mandate global data and process standards that would have provided the integrated view of information needed to provide employees with new enterprisewide insights and better decision-making. Furthermore, without a consolidated, consistent base of trusted information, these CFOs found it increasingly difficult to make good investment decisions and “illuminate the future direction of the enterprise.” Their companies were also more susceptible to risks because they did not have timely and contextually relevant access to accurate, trusted information to prepare for or manage threats.
  • Slide 14 - Gaining control of all the information that is available to the enterprise is key to unlocking its business value. The question is how can the enterprise unlock the business value of information? CIOs ’ horizontal view of the business puts them in the best position to see how siloed information and the lack of enterprisewide standards can fragment the business operation, slow management reporting and limit the quality of decisions. They know what it will take to aggregate the data locked up in departmental silos and convert it to meaningful intelligence. But having a plan is critical. CIOs can be instrumental in bringing together stakeholders from across the enterprise to establish an information agenda that identifies what data is important to the organization; how, when and to whom it should be made available; the technology required to support and access it; and the business processes and governance practices required to manage it over its lifetime. An information agenda enables business and IT to work together to build a best-in-class information management strategy for the organization and create a detailed roadmap to realize it. Good information management requires more than just adding capacity to manage the growing volume of data. A robust and resilient information infrastructure is essential to supporting the changing needs of the business, enabling more effective information management by improving core capabilities like information compliance, availability, retention, and security. CIOs understand how technologies like master data management, information integration and data warehousing can provide an enterprisewide information infrastructure that is the basis for enhanced visibility, control and insight. In addition, they know how to leverage existing investments within the new information architecture to improve efficiency and maximize performance. CIOs who can do these things can deliver trusted, accurate information for optimized business performance. They can also provide the basis for unlocking the kind of business insight and intelligence needed to enable competitive advantage.
  • Slide 15 – But unlocking the business value of information also requires providing a new kind of business intelligence. Organizations must have the ability to pull together real-time information from across the value chain on demand to respond to new market opportunities. They must have the analytical resources to extract this kind of actionable intelligence from legacy systems, information networks and a near infinite array of online sources—and do it in seconds and minutes, rather than hours and days. Innovations like stream computing are making this kind of intelligence available, tracking and analyzing live streaming data from thousands of sources simultaneously. This combination of massive computing power and real-time analytics can be especially beneficial in the financial services, governmental and scientific fields, which would otherwise get bogged down by the large volumes of complex data and instantaneous analysis that modern business demands. Advances in data visualization, situational awareness, predictive modeling and simulation software also provide this new kind of intelligence. They provide greater visibility into the current operation, but also a window to the future. Predictive intelligence enables companies to make smarter, more fact-based decisions that produce bigger returns at lower risk. CIOs who can leverage business analytics and optimization technologies to bring predictive intelligence to the enterprise can improve productivity and decision outcomes.
  • Slide 16 – So building a smarter enterprise involves transforming information into a strategic asset. These two examples illustrate how companies are dealing with the explosion of information. In one case (NYPD), it ’s about using technology to assemble all the scattered information from across the organization into a single shared intelligence repository. In the next case (Geoscience Australia), it’s about using technology to build an information infrastructure capable of handling an enormous and growing repository of data, and then providing the tools to get at that data in a timely and efficient manner. Central to the idea of New Intelligence is being able to replace a rear-mirror view of the business with a forward-looking stance that can start incorporating predictions about where the business is heading. The New York Police Department (NYPD) represents a perfect example of what ’s possible when the switch is made. The largest police department in the U.S. had compiled a wealth of information, but much of it was trapped in departmental silos, collected by officers and detectives in all five boroughs of New York. The lack of a holistic view lessened the NYPD’s ability to analyze, synthesize and ultimately act on information to prevent crime. Today the NYPD ’s Crime Information Warehouse provides over 37,000 officers with a single point of access to real-time data on virtually all crimes committed in New York City. Officers can see the big picture and share information that is critical to solving current crimes and preventing future incidents. Using analytical, global mapping and visualization tools to compile and build intelligence from various strands of crime-related data (911 calls, crime statistics, dispatcher and officer reports), NYPD officers and analysts are able to identify crime patterns as they form. They are better able to predict crime and take proactive measures to stop it before it ever happens. ______________________________________________________________________________________________ Geoscience Australia , one of the Australian government ’s leading environmental agencies maintains an enormous archive of offshore seismic data and satellite remote sensing data compiled over decades. With growth expected to reach 2.7 petabytes in 10 years, the archive began to pose real challenges for the government agency. By moving its data to a robotic storage and retrieval system using media that consumes considerably less floor space, provides more storage flexibility and has the capability to accommodate future growth, Geoscience Australia has improved operational efficiencies. Labor-intensive and error-prone information management tasks have been replaced by automated processes. More importantly, the new information infrastructure has dramatically reduced access time from a month or more to as little as a day, with some data available for immediate download from the agency ’s Web site. Massive amounts of publicly available data are now secure and resilient via a sustainable repository designed to meet the country’s storage and retrieval needs for years to come.
  • Presentation Section: Why does enterprise content management matter? Slide Title: Enterprise content: your organization ’s DNA Slide Purpose: Define the terms “enterprise content” and “enterprise content management,” define the topic of the presentation. Speaker Notes / Concepts: Xxx Xxx Xxx
  • Presentation Section: Why does enterprise content management matter? Slide Title: Organizations need to be smarter, faster. Slide Purpose: Tee up the need for faster, deeper business insight—a business challenge that enterprise content management can address. Speaker Notes / Concepts: This slide starts to link enterprise content management to themes of business intelligence, business optimization, business analytics, and content analytics. The “pointer” to enterprise content management is the fact that you can’t have total insight into your business without insight into your content (80 percent of the information within a business is unstructured content)
  • Presentation Section: Why does enterprise content management matter? Slide Title: Knowledge workers demand agility and autonomy. Slide Purpose: Tee up the need for improved business process agility—a business requirement that enterprise content management can address. Speaker Notes / Concepts: This slide starts to link enterprise content management to themes of business agility, business process management, and case management. The “pointer” to enterprise content management is the fact that you can’t have total agility in your business without the capability to manage content-centric processes effectively.
  • Presentation Section: Why does enterprise content management matter? Slide Title: Business is becoming more social. Slide Purpose: Tee up the rise in utilization of social business methods—a business trend that enterprise content management can address. Speaker Notes / Concepts: This slide starts to link enterprise content management to themes of social media, social business, and collaboration. The “pointer” to enterprise content management is the fact that social business creates vast new sources and volumes of content that may need to be managed / governed / analyzed.
  • Presentation Section: Why does enterprise content management matter? Slide Title: Your organizational advantage is trapped in your content. Slide Purpose: Introduce the key problem statement that drives the whole presentation: without effective enterprise content management, your organization cannot reach its strategic goals. Speaker Notes / Concepts: Insight will be limited, agility constrained, and social business hampered by ineffective content management strategies and practices. Conversely, organizational success can be unleashed through more effective enterprise content management.
  • Presentation Section: Why do I need to act, and why now? Slide Title: Smarter organizations manage content for value. Slide Purpose: Provide inspiring examples of organizations that understand the importance of managing their content effectively, and have achieved measurable return on their investments in enterprise content management. Speaker Notes / Concepts: Detailed slides for each of these case studies are located in back-up.
  • Presentation Section: Why do I need to act, and why now? Slide Title: Do any of these challenges sound familiar? Slide Purpose: Provide more detailed, specific examples of challenges that organizations face related to their enterprise content. Speaker Notes / Concepts: Many companies may not realize that a whole multitude of seemingly disconnected challenges that they face can all be addressed through more effective content management.
  • Presentation Section: Why do I need to act, and why now? Slide Title: Do any of these opportunities resonate? Slide Purpose: Provide more detailed, specific examples of opportunities that organizations can seize by managing enterprise content more effectively. Speaker Notes / Concepts: Enterprise content management is not just about addressing challenges, reducing costs, or mitigating risk; it can also accelerate opportunity .
  • Presentation Section: Why do I need to act, and why now? Slide Title: Content and the executive agenda. Slide Purpose: Explain how these linkages between enterprise content and business strategy are driving enterprise content management upward on the “executive agenda.” Speaker Notes / Concepts: -- IBM ’s CEO and CIO studies confirm that executives are struggling to make informed decisions and take decisive action because their information visibility is limited. -- Executives need help developing flexible, shared services models that enable them and their employees to access information “in context” to support decision-making and action.
  • Presentation Section: What is required for effective enterprise content management? Slide Title: The dizzying complexity of enterprise content. Slide Purpose: Convey the challenge of addressing content-centric business imperatives when the underlying content environments are so dizzyingly complex, with a formidable array of content creators, content consumers, content formats, and content stores. Speaker Notes / Concepts: Even organizations that have invested in enterprise content management (which is most) are struggling to keep up with the pace of change and the dynamic increases in content creators, consumers, formats, sources, and locations. Most deployed ECM environments address only a fraction of the total opportunity to improve content management, leaving many performance gaps There is tremendous appetite to address enterprise content management with more systematic, strategic, and consolidated approaches
  • Presentation Section: What is required for effective enterprise content management? Slide Title: Smarter models are emerging. Slide Purpose: Use this slide to have a dialogue with the client about whether their current content management platforms and strategies adequately reflect the new design paradigms that are required. Speaker Notes / Concepts: Fortunately, new models and paradigms are emerging to address clients ’ complex requirements in enterprise content management Discuss how each element of the older, “traditional” paradigm is giving way to a new, emerging paradigm.
  • Client Name: IBM Japan Business Services Subtitle: Analyzes customer service interactions to improve agent training As a member of the IBM Japan group, IBM Japan Business Services Co., Ltd. runs business transformation outsourcing services for internal IBM group companies as well as external clients. The company offers on-demand contact center business that handles customer inquiries by phone, email and Web, and it provides back-office support for contract management and other functions. The need: The organization needed to improve the quality of customer support it offers by enhancing agent training. The existing FAQ-based training program was not sufficient: agents were not prepared to handle many real-world problems. Many of the first-line agents had to pass along inquiries to more experienced personnel, and as a result, the workload of those secondary agents grew rapidly.   The organization had accumulated a large volume of data and call logs from customer service interactions, but it was not fully capitalizing on that information. The organization wanted to make better use of this data to improve agent training and ultimately deliver better customer support. The solution: The organization implemented IBM Cognos Content Analytics software to collect essential information from unstructured texts, ranging from text documents to customer voices, and then categorize and analyze information. The software has advanced capabilities for understanding and processing language. Managers use the software to examine complex, challenging and long customer service interactions that primary agents could not resolve on their own, identifying key words used in inquiries and evaluating agent responses. The results help to determine which skills need to be improved. While helping to improve agent training, the analyses also enable the organization to identify problems with products, which can help improve future development efforts.   The organization has created 50 or more analyses that it regularly runs on customer service interactions to help improve the quality of service.   The analyses have helped the company make positive changes in training. As a result, primary agents can handle more inquiries without having to transfer calls to secondary personnel. In the month prior to training changes, 202 inquiries were transferred to secondary agents. Six months after changes were made, only 16 were transferred. Before changes, primary agents could address fewer than 40 percent of inquiries without help. Six months later, they could handle more than 60 percent. What makes it smarter: • Intelligent: The software analyzes complex, challenging and long customer service interactions, identifying key words or topics and highlighting responses provided by agents. Managers are able to pinpoint skill deficiencies in agents and improve training to enhance customer service quality. As a result, primary agents now handle more inquiries without having to transfer calls to secondary personnel. • Instrumented: The organization collects all types of customer inquiries and responses, including phone, email and Web interactions. The software is able to perform analyses on text and audio. • Interconnected: By implementing the new software, the organization has been able to bring together relevant information from multiple customer service centers, produce insights to improve training, and even contribute to the improvement of future product development. Usage level : Win/Ongoing project/Completed project: External Win/Ongoing project/Completed project Industry : Computer Services * 92 percent reduction in number of issues needed to be handed over to secondary agents * 88 percent improvement in rate of calls handles by primary agent * 88 percent decrease in number of calls on product bugs
  • Client: PPL Corporation Subtitle: Reducing information access from five days to seconds PPL controls or owns nearly 12,000 megawatts of generating capacity in the United States, sells energy in key US markets, and delivers electricity to about 4 million customers in Pennsylvania and the United Kingdom. Challenge With an eye on operational efficiency and a commitment to excellence, PPL sought to minimize the challenges inherent in managing paper-based records, from the cost and space required to store records to the likelihood that information could be misplaced or lost. Additionally, with the increased scrutiny on email communications, PPL wanted to improve document retention processes with IBM Enterprise Records to more efficiently and effectively collect trusted information for regulatory compliance and improved information life-cycle governance. Solution Since the early 1990s, IBM Software has provided PPL staff with the fast access to the trusted information they need to increase efficiency and reduce costs. For example, the organization used IBM Software to capture about 880,000 right-of-way images for its transmission lines. By doing so, PPL reduced the time for staff—including real estate department personnel, tax and accounting personnel and mobile crews, among others—to access the images from up to five days to just seconds. Likewise, the solution helped PPL reduce the time to compile right-of-way data for new transmission line projects from nearly two years to just six months. It is also helping staff to unlock the value of trusted information. Before, each generating facility captured and maintained its own data in separate systems. Now that maintenance information is stored in one location, staff can easily see if another facility has faced a similar problem and share solutions for faster resolution. Thousands of employees across the company currently access PPL ’s trusted information via IBM Software for everything from supply chain and contract management to drawing and financial management. In 2006, PPL worked with IBM ECM Lab Services to address the retention requirements of its email messages and records stored on file shares and to better confirm that trusted information is being properly captured, consolidated, stored and managed throughout all phases of its life cycle. Benefits Reduced time to access records from up to five days to just seconds; 75 percent decrease in time to compile information for new projects; helped staff confirm retention of critical email messages and documents for regulatory requirements
  • Presentation Section: What is required for effective enterprise content management? Slide Title: Smarter content management requires… Slide Purpose: This is an “outline” slide that tees up the next three slides; those three slides, in aggregate, provide a structured way for organizations to define and execute their enterprise content management strategies. Speaker Notes / Concepts: Use this section to establish your role as “trusted advisor” to the audience; explain how audience can think in terms of value drivers, value entry points, and underlying technology platform to implement effective content management.
  • Presentation Section: What is required for effective enterprise content management? Slide Title: Identify and quantify the value drivers. Slide Purpose: This slide conveys IBM ’s understanding of the fact that enterprise content management solutions are defined by their business context and by the business value that the client wants to derive from the solution. Speaker Notes / Concepts: This slide provides a lot of potential avenues you can go down, discussing the client ’s industry context, relevant use cases, and / or the value drivers they would like to realize via enterprise content management. Slide lends itself towards and interactive discussion on the client ’s business context and drivers.
  • Presentation Section: What is required for effective enterprise content management? Slide Title: Select your value entry point. Slide Purpose: This slide introduces the five main entry points to enterprise content management; slide provides an excellent jumping-off point into one or more of the solution presentations (which correspond to these five entry points). Speaker Notes / Concepts: These are the five major entry points into IBM ’s enterprise content management portfolio.
  • Presentation Section: What is required for effective enterprise content management? Slide Title: Harness industry-leading technology. Slide Purpose: The purpose of this slide is to subtly convey the point that effective enterprise content management solutions must be built on top of industry-leading technology (i.e. IBM). Speaker Notes / Concepts: Clients should have the option to augment the value derived from their ECM entry point via middleware extensions into analytics, BPM, data management, collaboration, etc. Clients also should be able to leverage robust, flexible technology available via a variety of delivery platforms. Implicitly, this slide differentiates IBM with our breadth of middleware and technology capability.
  • Presentation Section: Why IBM for enterprise content management? Slide Title: Why IBM? Recognized industry leader. Slide Purpose: This slide transitions into the explicit “Why IBM” pitch that concludes the presentation. Speaker Notes / Concepts: Emphasize IBM ’s clear, established leadership within the industry analyst community. Emphasize IBM ’s market leadership a evidenced by our prominence within leading companies across multiple industries.
  • Presentation Section: What is required for effective enterprise content management? Slide Title: Next steps. Slide Purpose: Provide concrete action steps that the audience can take to deepen their awareness and understanding of IBM enterprise content management. Speaker Notes / Concepts: You may wish to modify this slide based on the next steps you want your audience to take.

Transcript

  • 1. Smarter Enterprise Content Management
  • 2. Derick Deleo Director, WW IBM ECM Technical Professionals [email_address]
  • 3. NEW INTELLIGENCE To manage the mountain of information generated daily by increasingly connected systems, devices and people, while extracting richer insights and making faster, better decisions
  • 4. We are seeing increasing amounts of data, which must be transformed into information to create new intelligence … Source: IDC, The Expanding Digital Universe, March 2007 New Intelligence is about gaining control of the information explosion Volume of digital data
    • 57% CAGR for enterprise data through 2010
    • Machine-generated data from a growing array of devices and objects
    • 80% of new data growth is unstructured content
    • E-mail, images, audio …
    Variety of information
    • Rapidly changing business climate
    • Need to stay ahead and plan for future
    Velocity of decision making
  • 5. Less and less information is being effectively captured, analyzed and made available to the people who need it
    • 59% do not have access to information across the value chain that would be most useful to them
    85% of CIOs do not believe that their information is well managed 70% do not get predictions on future opportunities and problems Source: Information Management Online
  • 6. Senior executives want to make better use of their information Provide critical insight to identify changes in market behavior, improve relationships, identify new markets and develop new offerings that ensure maximum business impact Drive new revenue, profits and competitive advantage Optimize the allocation and deployment of resources and capital Create cost efficiencies that align to business strategies and objectives Help reduce vulnerability and provide greater certainty in predicting, identifying and responding to threats Lower business risk
  • 7. The missed opportunity associated with inaccessible or inaccurate information can be considerable 0 10 5 15 20 25 Revenue growth Stock price - industry Finance organizations whose information was more accessible and trusted due to enterprisewide integration and common data definitions, standards and processes Finance organizations that did not exhibit these characteristics Poorly informed finance organizations reported significantly lower revenue and stock price growth Source: IBM Global Business Services, The Global CFO Study 2008; Thomson Financial; 2007 Wall Street Journal “Annual Industry Report.”
  • 8. How can the enterprise unlock the business value of information?
    • Consolidating silos of information
    • Establishing enterprisewide data and process standards
    • Bringing together stakeholders to establish an information agenda for the enterprise
    • Developing an information management strategy and roadmap
    • Implementing a robust, resilient enterprisewide information infrastructure that is the basis for enhanced visibility, control and insight.
    With a horizontal view of the business, CIOs can see through the clutter, gain control and maximize the business value of information: Enter the CIO …
  • 9. New intelligence requires the ability to pull together real-time information on demand from across the value chain Legacy systems News feeds Information networks Customer Web sites Business partner intranets RSS feeds Advances in stream computing, modeling and analytics deliver trusted and predictive intelligence for better decision making and opportunities forecasting
  • 10. Building a smarter enterprise: transforming information into a strategic asset New York Police Department
    • Uses Crime Information Warehouse to provide all officers with a single point of access to real-time crime data
    • Combines global mapping and visualization tools to compile and build crime intelligence
    • Detects crime patterns as they form
    • Proactively heads off spikes in criminal activity.
    Geoscience Australia
    • Leverages an information infrastructure capable of accommodating the agency ’s petabyte-sized data growth
    • Enjoys increased flexibility and efficiency via a robotic storage and retrieval system and automated information management
    • Has reduced information retrieval from months to as little as a day.
  • 11. Enterprise Information Management Gartner, Key Issues for Enterprise Information Management 2007 EIM is defined “as an integrative discipline for structuring, describing and governing information assets regardless of organizational and technological boundaries in order to improve operational efficiency, promote transparency and enable business insight.”
    • EIM is comprised of
    • MDM
    • ECM
    • Data governance
    • Data warehousing
    • Other interdependent data management initiatives
  • 12. Today, more than ever, organizations use software to enable every facet of their business . Software Business
  • 13. But with new models and ways of working come new challenges ... Data everywhere As the world becomes more instrumented, the challenge is to get more out of the wealth of new information—from managing data to developing insights. Differentiation through people As always, it ’ s the capabilities and ingenuity of the people in business that deliver results. But today, it ’ s about more than just those on your payroll—the greater opportunity is how well you can engage a worldwide ecosystem of employees, partners, suppliers, and customers to help create new value. New expectations for value Customer expectations have never been higher: Personalized service, delivered flawlessly. Global integration and connectivity As the world becomes more interconnected and as the paradigm of the organization shifts from multinational corporation to globally integrated enterprise, businesses can no longer afford to operate as islands. More than ever, they need to find ways to connect both internally and externally. Security risks Technology has allowed work to move beyond physical locations and brand offices. It now exists on virtual platforms, across dispersed teams and players. But the more data and information organizations make available to their internal audience, the greater the risk.
  • 14. And as a result, a new set of needs has emerged. Turn information into insights Drive business integration and optimization Connect & collaborate Enable business service & product innovation Optimize the impact of business infrastructures and services Manage risk, security & compliance
  • 15. These needs range from building technology advantage to developing new strategic business solutions . Turn information into insights Drive business integration and optimization Connect & collaborate Enable business service & product innovation Optimize the impact of business infrastructures and services Manage risk, security & compliance “ I need to make better use of my company’s information. That means my company has to do a better job managing data and content. With timely access to clean data, we could devise new ways to serve our customers.” “ I need better ways to connect my team to improve their productivity and ability to make timely decisions. By connecting key processes and enhancing collaboration, we can be more responsive to our customers and partners.” “ I need to create more efficiency within our existing infrastructure. That starts with greater visibility and control across all of our operations— both IT and enterprise—and better management of our overall resources.” “ I need to create the processes and flexible infrastructure our organization needs to react more quickly to changing market conditions.” “ I need to deliver smarter products, services and capabilities more efficiently and reduce cost and risk across the product and application lifecycle, while also providing better service experiences to my end customers.” “ I need to ensure that my organization is pro-actively identifying all the different types of risks to our business, and that we have security and resiliency plans in place to address any threat or disruption.” Business solutions Technology advantage
  • 16. Information = data + content (and the content part is growing the fastest…) © 2011 IBM Corporation Data (structured information) Content (unstructured information)
  • 17. Enterprise content: your organization ’s DNA How will you unlock its potential?
      • Like DNA strands that contain genetic code, enterprise content holds the key to
      • enhanced business insight, agility
      • and performance.
      • Enterprise content management is the
      • set of strategies and practices that enables
      • your organization to maximize
      • value from content.
    © 2011 IBM Corporation
  • 18. To achieve a competitive edge, Organizations need to be smarter, faster.
      • 77 percent of CEOs say they do not have real-time information to make key business decisions.
      • 1 in 3 business leaders frequently make business decisions based on information they don ’ t have or don ’ t trust.
      • 1 in 2 business leaders say they don ’ t have access to the information they need to do their jobs.
    Companies that invest in business insight outperform their peers, showing 33 percent higher revenue growth, 12 times more profit growth and a 32 percent higher return on invested capital. Sources: IBM 2011 CEO Study; IBM 2011 CFO Study; IBM 2011 Break Away with Business Analytics and Optimization Study. © 2011 IBM Corporation
  • 19. To accelerate service delivery, Knowledge workers demand agility and autonomy.
      • 11 percent of knowledge workers claim to have well-defined and mapped case management processes.
      • 40 percent cite difficulty adding or changing processes as their biggest case-handling problem.
      • Nearly half have access to fewer than 40 percent of customer records required for case processing.
    Companies that invest in business agility outperform their peers, showing 10 percent higher revenue growth, 40 percent higher profit growth, and 60 percent higher return on invested capital. Sources: AIIM; BTM Corporation; financial results based on five-year trended analysis by BTM Corporation. © 2011 IBM Corporation
  • 20. To enhance customer intimacy and employee collaboration, Business is becoming more social.
      • 69 percent of executives report gaining measurable business benefits from social technologies.
      • 52 percent of organizations plan to increase investment in social media and collaboration tools in 2011.
    “ Social media has shifted control of the corporate message away from the organization and towards consumers and other stakeholders, and running away and hiding is no longer the safe option.” Burson-Marsteller “ The Global Social Media Checkup,” February 2011 Sources: Gartner, 2011; McKinsey, 2009. © 2011 IBM Corporation
  • 21. Your organizational advantage is trapped in your content. 90% Content that is currently not being managed by organizations 80% New data growth from unstructured content (e.g., email, documents, images, video and audio) 60% Managers who miss key information when making business decisions 50% Organizational content that carries risk without delivering business value Sources: Various IBM and public studies.
  • 22. To optimize business outcomes, Smarter organizations manage content for value. SMART IS … ELIMINATING PAPER. A large U.S. federal agency saved more than US$1.3 billion annually by eliminating paper. SMART IS … GOVERNING AND DEFENSIBLY DISPOSING OF INFORMATION. JM Family Enterprises saved US$2.1 million annually by reducing call center labor costs. SMART IS … IMPROVING CONTENT-CENTRIC WORKFLOWS. J.B. Hunt added US$870,000 annually by more accurately charging customers. SMART IS … RAPIDLY DERIVING CONTENT INSIGHTS. A large U.S. bank achieved ROI on content analytics in seven months. SMART IS … LOWERING LEGAL RISK AND COST. BASF implemented more cost-effective governance.
  • 23. Do any of these challenges sound familiar? For 72 percent of workers, it ’s harder to find information they own than information they don’t own. More than 60 percent of organizations rely on manual processes to capture 75 percent of customer communications. Litigation costs are the largest uncontrolled costs in U.S. corporations (US$115 million average cost in 2008). 60 percent of companies believe “our content chaos is getting out of hand and we need to control it.” Sources: AIIM 2011 Adaptive Case Management Report; AIIM 2011 State of Enterprise Content Management Report. © 2011 IBM Corporation © 2011 IBM Corporation
  • 24. Do any of these opportunities resonate? Imagine if you could … … leverage claim patterns to optimize medical treatment approaches … analyze “voice of the customer” insights to decrease churn … adjust loan procedures dynamically to account for risk fluctuations … decommission business records, while improving regulatory and risk postures
  • 25. Content and the executive agenda Emerging executive-level imperatives underscore the need for content management solutions across the wider organization.
      • 78 percent of customer-focused CEOs will focus on insight and intelligence to realize strategy.
      • 74 percent of CFOs believe that the need for faster decision making will change their industry.
      • 78 percent of CIOs want to improve the way they use and manage their content.
    “ Hertz gathers an amazing amount of customer insight daily…. We wanted to leverage this insight at both the strategic level and the local level to drive operational improvements. Working closely with the IBM–Mindshare team, we are able to better focus on improvements that our customers care about.” Joe Eckroth, CIO, Hertz Corporation Sources: IBM 2011 CEO Study; IBM 2011 CFO Study. C-suite Line of business Administration IT Legal
  • 26. The staggering complexity of enterprise content Content creators Employees Partners Vendors Suppliers Customers Prospects Content types Social media Documents Images Web forms Video and audio Email Mobile applications Business applications Structured data Content stores Repositories File cabinets File servers Email archives ERP systems Web servers Wikis and blogs Databases Storage devices Content consumers Employees Partners Vendors Suppliers Customers Prospects © 2011 IBM Corporation
  • 27. Smarter models are emerging. Smarter content management Content in a shared services model, delivered in context to specific business users and processes, driving faster insight and action Traditional content management Content locked in multiple, siloed repositories, driving uncontrolled proliferation, inconsistent access, and mounting costs and risks Infrastructure-led approaches Business solution–led approaches Siloed, departmental management Collaborative, shared services model Manual, inefficient processes Optimized, dynamic processes “ Keep everything ” governance model Policy-based information lifecycle “ Search and hope ” user experience Analytics- and people-driven insight
  • 28. State of North Dakota Smart is delivering services more effectively Industry context: government services Value driver: improve process efficiency Solution on-ramp: advanced case management Business challenge The state of North Dakota wanted to securely share citizen information across agencies statewide and to gain greater visibility into its operations. What ’ s smart? The state enabled agencies to efficiently retain, access and share information by replacing paper-based processes with an automated, centralized advanced case management solution from IBM . Smarter business outcomes Reduces response time to citizen inquiries from days to seconds; improves process efficiency, information sharing and cost savings “ Advanced case management will help keep our parole officers safer because they'll have information faster and more reliably.” — Chuck Picard, EDMS coordinator, State of North Dakota
  • 29. Japan business services provider Smart is gleaning insight about customers Industry context: computer services Value driver: improve customer service Solution on-ramp: content analytics Business challenge A Japanese business services provider operates multiple customer service centers and needed ways to analyze large volumes of information to improve agent training and deliver better customer support. What ’ s smart? The company implemented content analytics from IBM to understand and process natural language. The solution analyzes customer interactions based on consolidated logs of phone calls, email and web, identifying keywords. Smarter business outcomes Improved agent skills and training, resulting in a 92 percent reduction in call transfer and 88 percent improvement in volume; provided new insights about product issues, resulting in an 88 percent decrease in product-related calls “ Insight into customer interaction logs is an information gold mine for us.” — General manager, Japan business services provider
  • 30. PPL Corporation Smart is knowing what to keep Industry context: energy and utilities Value driver: reduce costs, improve compliance Solution on-ramp: information lifecycle governance Business challenge PPL wanted to minimize the risks and costs associated with records, plus improve document retention for regulatory compliance and information governance. What ’ s smart? PPL addressed its email and records retention requirements by properly capturing, consolidating, storing and managing content across the content lifecycle, enabling compliance staff to find trusted, contextually relevant information in a single retention record. Smarter business outcomes The IBM solution reduced time to access records from up to five days to just seconds, enabled a 75 percent decrease in time to compile information for new projects and helped staff retain critical documents to meet regulatory requirements. “ Before, it could take up to five days to get a file from our records department. Now staff can access documents at the click of a button.” — Jim Mazurowski, supervisor, Information Solutions, PPL Corporation
  • 31. Smarter content management requires … Identifying and quantifying the value drivers Selecting your value entry point Harnessing industry-leading technology © 2011 IBM Corporation
  • 32. Identify and quantify the value drivers What ’s your business ? Unlocking value starts within your specific industry context. Industry context
    • Banking
    • Insurance
    • Government
    • Energy and utilities
    • Telecommunications
    • Health care
    • Transportation
    • Manufacturing
    What ’s your use case ? The value you derive will be associated with one or more business application areas. Business application
    • Records management
    • Commercial lending
    • Claims processing
    • Fraud detection
    • Benefits management
    • Member enrollment
    • Employee onboarding
    What ’s your goal ? Quantifiable value drivers justify investments in enterprise content management. Value drivers
    • Product and service innovation
    • Competitive differentiation
    • Workforce productivity
    • Customer insight
    • Risk management
    • Cost savings
  • 33. Select your value entry point Where to start ? The path to value lies along one or more specific solution entry points. Document imaging and capture Capture, manage and share content anywhere it exists Social content management Connect people with social content and office documents Advanced case management Optimize case and business outcomes Content analytics Gain unexpected business insights Information lifecycle governance Reduce cost and risk by managing information through its lifecycle
  • 34. Harness industry-leading technology An effective technology platform for ECM incorporates these elements
    • Platform capabilities
    • Enterprise integration and federation
    • Unparalleled extensibility and scalability
    • Flexible deployment models (e.g., on premises, hosted and cloud)
    • Middleware extensions
    • Business analytics
    • Business process management
    • Data management
    • Social business
    • Web content management
    • Value entry points
    • Document imaging and capture
    • Social content management
    • Advanced case management
    • Content analytics
    • Information lifecycle governance
  • 35. Why IBM? A recognized industry leader
      • Leader— Gartner Magic Quadrant, Enterprise Content Management
      • Leader— Forrester Wave, Dynamic Case Management
      • Leader— Forrester Wave, ECM Suites
      • IBM ’s enterprise content management solutions are deployed in the following:
    • Seven of the top eight banks worldwide
    • 24 of the top 25 insurers worldwide
    • 15 of the top 16 telecommunication companies worldwide
    • All eight top retailers worldwide
    • All 24 top U.S. government agencies
    Sources: Gartner, Forrester, Dun & Bradstreet, 2011. © 2011 IBM Corporation
  • 36. Thank You! © 2011 IBM Corporation
  • 37. Trademarks and notes © Copyright IBM Corporation 2010 IBM Software Group One Rogers Street Cambridge, MA 02142 U.S.A. Produced in the United States of America February 2011 All Rights Reserved IBM, the IBM logo, and ibm.com are trademarks of International Business Machines Corp., registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Other product and service names might be trademarks of IBM or other companies. A current list of IBM trademarks is available on the Web at “Copyright and trademark information” at ibm.com /legal/copytrade.shtml . References in this publication to IBM products or services do not imply that IBM intends to make them available in all countries in which IBM operates. Client success stories are available at ibm.com /software/success/cssdb.nsf . The information contained in this documentation is provided for informational purposes only. While efforts were made to verify the completeness and accuracy of the information contained in this documentation, it is provided “as is” without warranty of any kind, express or implied. In addition, this information is based on IBM’s current product plans and strategy, which are subject to change by IBM without notice. IBM shall not be responsible for any damages arising out of the use of, or otherwise related to, this documentation or any other documentation. Nothing contained in this documentation is intended to, nor shall have the effect of, creating any warranties or representations from IBM (or its suppliers or licensors), or altering the terms and conditions of the applicable license agreement governing the use of IBM software. IBM customers are responsible for ensuring their own compliance with legal requirements. It is the customer ’s sole responsibility to obtain advice of competent legal counsel as to the identification and interpretation of any relevant laws and regulatory requirements that may affect the customer’s business and any actions the customer may need to take to comply with such laws.