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Ch 31 PowerPoint
 

Ch 31 PowerPoint

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The wonderful world of fungi.

The wonderful world of fungi.

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    Ch 31 PowerPoint Ch 31 PowerPoint Presentation Transcript

    • Ch 31: Fungi By: Monica Puccetti
    • 31.1 Fungi are heterotrophs
      • They can’t make their own food.
      • They gain nutrients by secreting powerful hydrolytic enzymes into their surroundings
      • The enzymes break down complex molecules into smaller ones that the fungi can absorb into their bodies.
      • They play an important role in ecosystems as decomposers.
    • Body Structure
      • Most common are multicellular filaments and single cells (yeasts).
      • Hyphae is a continuous network of tiny filaments in the mushroom and the surrounding area.
      • Fungal hyphae form an interwoven mass called a mycelium. This infiltrates the fungi’s food.
      • Chitin strengthens fungal cell walls, like cellulose in plant cells.
    •  
    • 31.5 Fungi as decomposers, mutualists, and pathogens
      • Without fungi life as we know it would not exist.
      • Without them necessary elements such as carbon, nitrogen, and others would remain stuck in organic material.
    • Fungi as Mutualists
      • Endophytes: Fungi that live inside leaves or other plants parts without causing them harm.
      • Fungi also help in the digestive process of animals, helping to break down plant material.
    • Fungi as Pathogens
      • 30% of the 100,000 known species of fungi are parasites or pathogens, mostly of plants.
      • Only 50 species of fungi infect animals.
        • A fungal infection in animals is called mycosis
        • Many opportunistic mycoses have become more common in humans, due to the recent insurgence of AIDS which compromises the immune system.
    • Practical Uses of Fungi
      • Humans uses fungi to make cheese, bread, and alcoholic beverages.
      • Antibiotics, such as Penicillin, are produced by growing them in fungus.
      • Genetic research on fungi is leading to advances in biotechnology.