Lynching

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Lynching

  1. 1. <ul><li>http://www.diversityinc.com/public/2588print.cfm </li></ul><ul><li>Accessed 11.20.07 </li></ul>
  2. 2. A Portrait of the Lynching Era, 1880-1930 <ul><li>From Stewart E. Tolnay and E.M. Beck, A Festival of Violence: An Analysis of Southern Lynchings, 1882-1930 . </li></ul><ul><li>Accessed from the webpage http://www.umass.edu/complit/aclanet/ACLAText/USLynch.html ; Jana Evans Braziel, author </li></ul>&quot;In addition to the punishment of specific criminal offenders, lynching in the American South had three entwined functions: first, to maintain social order over the black population through terrorism; second , to suppress of eliminate black competitors for economic, political, or social rewards third , to stabilize the white class structure and preserve the privileged status of the white aristocracy&quot; (18-19).
  3. 3. 1882-1930 in 10 southern states <ul><li>2805 [documented] victims of lynch mobs </li></ul><ul><li>300 white men and women, </li></ul><ul><li>2,500 of lynch victims were African-American. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>94 percent died by white lynch mobs. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The scale of this carnage means that, on the average, a black man, woman, or child was murdered nearly once a week, every week, between 1882 and 1930 by a hate-driven white mob </li></ul><ul><li>From Stewart E. Tolnay and E.M. Beck, A Festival of Violence: An Analysis of Southern Lynchings, 1882-1930 . </li></ul><ul><li>Accessed from the webpage http://www.umass.edu/complit/aclanet/ACLAText/USLynch.html ; Jana Evans Braziel, author </li></ul>
  4. 4. Black Victims of White Lynch Mobs by State, 1882-1930 State/ No. of victims <ul><li>Deep South </li></ul><ul><li>Mississippi/ 462 Georgia/ 423 Louisiana/ 283 Alabama/ 262 South Carolina/ 143 </li></ul><ul><li>From Stewart E. Tolnay and E.M. Beck, A Festival of Violence: An Analysis of Southern Lynchings, 1882-1930 . </li></ul><ul><li>Accessed from the webpage http://www.umass.edu/complit/aclanet/ACLAText/USLynch.html ; Jana Evans Braziel, author </li></ul>Border South Florida/ 212 Tennessee/ 174 Arkansas/ 162 Kentucky/ 118 North Carolina/ 75
  5. 5. Black Victims of Lynchings per 100,000 Blacks by State, 1882-1930 State/ No. of victims per 100,000 <ul><li>Deep South </li></ul><ul><li>Mississippi/ 52.8 Georgia/ 41.8 Louisiana/ 43.7 Alabama/ 32.4 South Carolina/ 18.8 </li></ul>Border South Florida/ 79.8 Tennessee/ 38.4 Arkansas/ 42.6 Kentucky/ 45.7 North Carolina/ 11.0 <ul><li>From Stewart E. Tolnay and E.M. Beck, A Festival of Violence: An Analysis of Southern Lynchings, 1882-1930 . </li></ul><ul><li>Accessed from the webpage http://www.umass.edu/complit/aclanet/ACLAText/USLynch.html ; Jana Evans Braziel, author </li></ul>
  6. 6. The Reasons Given for Black Lynchings <ul><li>Acting suspiciously </li></ul><ul><li>Gambling </li></ul><ul><li>Quarreling </li></ul><ul><li>Adultery </li></ul><ul><li>Grave robbing </li></ul><ul><li>Race hatred; Race troubles </li></ul><ul><li>Aiding murderer </li></ul><ul><li>Improper with white woman </li></ul><ul><li>Rape </li></ul><ul><li>Arguing with white man </li></ul><ul><li>Incest </li></ul><ul><li>Rape-murders </li></ul><ul><li>Arson Inciting to riot </li></ul><ul><li>Resisting mob </li></ul><ul><li>Assassination </li></ul><ul><li>Inciting trouble </li></ul><ul><li>Robbery </li></ul><ul><li>Killing livestock </li></ul><ul><li>Testifying against white man </li></ul><ul><li>Criminal assault </li></ul><ul><li>Living with white woman </li></ul><ul><li>Throwing stones </li></ul><ul><li>Cutting levee </li></ul><ul><li>Looting </li></ul><ul><li>Train wrecking </li></ul><ul><li>Defending rapist </li></ul><ul><li>Attempted murder </li></ul><ul><li>Indolence </li></ul><ul><li>Running a bordello </li></ul><ul><li>Banditry </li></ul><ul><li>Inflammatory language </li></ul><ul><li>Sedition </li></ul><ul><li>Being disreputable </li></ul><ul><li>Informing </li></ul><ul><li>Slander </li></ul><ul><li>Being obnoxious </li></ul><ul><li>Injuring livestock </li></ul><ul><li>Spreading disease </li></ul><ul><li>Boasting about riot </li></ul><ul><li>Insulting white man </li></ul><ul><li>Stealing </li></ul><ul><li>Burglary </li></ul><ul><li>Insulting white woman </li></ul><ul><li>Suing white man </li></ul><ul><li>Child abuse </li></ul><ul><li>Insurrection </li></ul><ul><li>Swindling </li></ul><ul><li>Conjuring </li></ul><ul><li>Kidnapping </li></ul><ul><li>Terrorism </li></ul><ul><li>Courting white woman </li></ul><ul><li>From Stewart E. Tolnay and E.M. Beck, A Festival of Violence: An Analysis of Southern Lynchings, 1882-1930 . </li></ul><ul><li>Accessed from the webpage http://www.umass.edu/complit/aclanet/ACLAText/USLynch.html ; Jana Evans Braziel, author </li></ul><ul><li>Making threats </li></ul><ul><li>Trying to colonize blacks </li></ul><ul><li>Demanding respect </li></ul><ul><li>Miscegenation </li></ul><ul><li>Trying to vote </li></ul><ul><li>Disorderly conduct </li></ul><ul><li>Mistaken identity </li></ul><ul><li>Unpopularity </li></ul><ul><li>Eloping with white woman </li></ul><ul><li>Molestation </li></ul><ul><li>Unruly remarks </li></ul><ul><li>Entered white woman's room </li></ul><ul><li>Murder </li></ul><ul><li>Using obscene language </li></ul><ul><li>Enticement </li></ul><ul><li>Non-sexual assault </li></ul><ul><li>Vagrancy </li></ul><ul><li>Extortion </li></ul><ul><li>Peeping Tom </li></ul><ul><li>Violated quarantine </li></ul><ul><li>Fraud </li></ul><ul><li>Pillage </li></ul><ul><li>Voodooism </li></ul><ul><li>Plotting to kill </li></ul><ul><li>Voting for wrong party </li></ul><ul><li>Frightening white woman </li></ul><ul><li>Poisoning well </li></ul>
  7. 7. The corpse of Clyde Johnson. August 3, 1935 . Yreka, California. <ul><li>From James Allen and John Littlefield, http://www.withoutsanctuary.org/main.html </li></ul><ul><li>Accessed 11.20.07 </li></ul>Gelatin silver print. Real photo postcard. 3.1/2 x 5 3/8 in. Etched in the negative, &quot;Killer of Jack Daw Aug 3, 1935 vengence in Siskiyou County.&quot;
  8. 8. The corpses of George and Ed Silsbee. January 20, 1900.  Fort Scott, Kansas. . <ul><li>From James Allen and John Littlefield, http://www.withoutsanctuary.org/main.html </li></ul><ul><li>Accessed 11.20.07 </li></ul>A large group of spectators holding kerosene lamps, downed fence in foreground. Gelatin silver print. Cabinet card. 7 x 10 in. Etched in negative, &quot;George and Ed SILSBEE HANGED by a MOB of CITIZENS IN FRONT OF JAIL. Jan. 20, 1900. Fort Scott Kan. Flash Light by Dabbs&quot;
  9. 9. <ul><li>From James Allen and John Littlefield, http://www.withoutsanctuary.org/main.html </li></ul><ul><li>Accessed 11.20.07 </li></ul>The bound corpses of two Italian immigrants, Castenego Ficarrotta and Angelo Albano, handcuffed together, hanging in a Florida swamp.  One with note affixed to feet, the other with pipe in mouth.  September 9, 1910.
  10. 10. <ul><li>From James Allen and John Littlefield, http://www.withoutsanctuary.org/main.html </li></ul><ul><li>Accessed 11.20.07 </li></ul>The lynching of four unidentified African Americans.  Circa 1900, location unknown. Gelatin silver print.  10 x 8&quot;

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