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Sex Education
Sex Education
Sex Education
Sex Education
Sex Education
Sex Education
Sex Education
Sex Education
Sex Education
Sex Education
Sex Education
Sex Education
Sex Education
Sex Education
Sex Education
Sex Education
Sex Education
Sex Education
Sex Education
Sex Education
Sex Education
Sex Education
Sex Education
Sex Education
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Sex Education

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  • I believe that it is something that needs to be taught at school. There are just some parents that dont ever tell their kids what sex is or how to take care of their bodies and there really needs to be a need for it. We don't want to have a Carrie on our hands and some girl with psychic powers blows up the school. That would not end well at all. We need everyone to learn how to care for their body and know what happens when puberty hits. www.aplusathletics.com
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    • 1. Sex Education Should it be taught in school?
    • 2. Sex Education in School <ul><li>It doesn’t have to be hard- just like a health class </li></ul><ul><li>Abstinence-Plus </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Enforces abstinence idea </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Gives kids the knowledge of what could happen and what to do </li></ul></ul><ul><li>They have a right to know </li></ul>
    • 3. What are the choices? <ul><li>Abstinence only </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Wait until marriage </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Contraceptive method </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Teaches how to protect yourself. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Abstinence-plus </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Uses both concepts </li></ul></ul>
    • 4. The Argument <ul><li>Black and white- both do not want to mix: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Abstinence only- outdated </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The majority of kids these days are having sex </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Contraception- too suggestive </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>This method “pushes kids to have sex” </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>There is a compromise </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Abstinence-plus </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Because the argument it so big between the main two, some think it’s not possible to combine the ideas. </li></ul></ul></ul>
    • 5. Statistics <ul><li>Sex ed.- not being taught correctly. Kids are paying for it: </li></ul><ul><li>By 18, 10 teen women and 5+ in 10 teen men have had sex </li></ul><ul><li>¼ of sexually experienced teens have not received instruction about abstinence before first sex </li></ul><ul><li>1/3 of teens have not received any formal instruction about contraceptives </li></ul>
    • 6. What is the best method? <ul><li>Abstinence-plus </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Kids should wait: the push for abstinence </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They need to know how to protect themselves: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Prevention </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Diseases/illness </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Contraception </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Why not? It’s a compromise . </li></ul></ul>
    • 7. When Should it be Taught? <ul><li>Elementary School </li></ul><ul><li>Middle School </li></ul><ul><li>High School </li></ul>
    • 8. What Would happen in each Scenario?
    • 9. What Should be Taught? <ul><li>There is so much information with the Abstinence-plus method… what parts should be taught? </li></ul>
    • 10. Abstinence <ul><li>Idea enforced </li></ul><ul><li>Infections/Diseases </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What could happen </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Importance of waiting </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Not ready emotionally </li></ul></ul>flux.uoregon.edu
    • 11. Contraception <ul><li>Protection could be taught based on when appropriate </li></ul><ul><li>*Teacher could teach how </li></ul><ul><li>*Where they could find out </li></ul><ul><li>Condoms/the ring </li></ul><ul><li>Birth control </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The pill </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Shot </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Patch </li></ul></ul>
    • 12. Don’t Want them to Learn Too Much <ul><li>Parents don’t want their kids learning too much too soon – info can be split up based on maturity </li></ul><ul><li>Start young: 5 th grade </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Don’t stop (go to 12 th ) </li></ul></ul>
    • 13. What Would be Appropriate When <ul><li>Fifth Grade: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Introducing the body- anatomy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Confusion of puberty- what’s happening & why </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Sixth: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Introduce idea of sex </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Enforce abstinence idea </li></ul></ul>
    • 14. Continued <ul><li>Seventh: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Continue with abstinence </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Talk about diseases and infections </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Eighth-Up: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Abstinence </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Contraception </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>everything </li></ul></ul>
    • 15. Who Should Teach It? <ul><li>Who can handle the job? </li></ul><ul><li>Health Official </li></ul><ul><li>Teacher </li></ul><ul><li>Pastor </li></ul>
    • 16. The Turn Out <ul><li>Health official </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Knowledge would be there </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Not what signed up for… realistic? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Teacher </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Can handle teaching </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>As long as serious = success </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Needs to know what they’re teaching </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Pastor </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Religion = conflict </li></ul></ul>
    • 17. Best Option <ul><li>Teacher </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Appropriate degree </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Makes sense </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Can handle teaching </li></ul></ul>
    • 18. How Should it Be Taught? <ul><li>Coed </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Uncomfortable </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Out of control </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Immaturity </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Separate sex </li></ul><ul><ul><li>More appropriate </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Less awkward </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Good environment </li></ul></ul>
    • 19. Obvious Choice <ul><li>Separate Sex </li></ul><ul><ul><li>More controlled environment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Necessary information taught </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Less awkward for kids </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Easier on everyone </li></ul></ul>
    • 20. Parents are Important <ul><li>Doesn’t stop with school </li></ul><ul><li>Way the parent reacts affects kid greatly </li></ul>
    • 21. Talking to Become more Common <ul><li>parents don’t want their kids to have sex- give too man morals and guilt trips </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Don’t scare away </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Need to realize teens will have sex </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Can’t change much but if talk early and in an appropriate way, can possibly change this </li></ul></ul>
    • 22. What I’m Saying <ul><li>Sex education needs to be taught at a younger age & with more info </li></ul><ul><li>They need to be taught abstinence-plus so they can see both sides- choose their own path </li></ul><ul><li>Schools and parents need to be responsible </li></ul>
    • 23. The Plan <ul><li>Abstinence-plus method </li></ul><ul><li>Start at 5 th grade – 12 th grade </li></ul><ul><li>Break up information </li></ul><ul><li>Get parents involved </li></ul>
    • 24. <ul><li>“’ Abstinence Plus’ Programs Can Reduce Risky Sexual Behaviors In Youth.” MediLexicon International Ltd. 2008. 17 Dec. 2008 <http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/ ‌ articles/ ‌ 97107.php>. </li></ul><ul><li>“ Abstinence, Sex Education and HIV Prevention.” avert.org . 20 Nov. 2008. 25 Nov. 2008 <http://www.avert.org/ ‌ abstinence.htm>. </li></ul><ul><li>Anderson, Deanna. “Pros and cons of sex education in schools.” eSSORTMENT.com . 2002. 25 Nov. 2008 <http://privateschool.about.com/ ‌ cs/ ‌ choosingaschool/ ‌ a/ ‌ singlesex.htm>. </li></ul><ul><li>Jones, Eliot. “Sex Education.” idebate.org . 27 Oct. 2000. IDEA Inc. 5 Dec. 2008 <http://www.idebate.org/ ‌ debatabase/ ‌ topic_details.php?topicID=52>. </li></ul><ul><li>Murphy, Jenny. “Should Teenagers be Taught Sex Education over Abstinence?” Speakout.com . 29 Jan. 2000. 17 Dec. 2008 <http://www.speakout.com/ ‌ activism/ ‌ issue_briefs/ ‌ 1086b-1.html>. </li></ul><ul><li>“ Policy Facts: Abstinence Education and HIV/ ‌ AIDS.” thebody.com . Aug. 2001. 17 Jan. 2008 <http://www.thebody.com/ ‌ content/ ‌ prev/ ‌ art33767.html>. </li></ul><ul><li>“ Public Schools and Sex Education.” publicschoolreview.com . 2008. 5 Dec. 2008 <http://www.publicschoolreview.com/ ‌ articles/ ‌ 46>. </li></ul><ul><li>Rector, Robert E., Melissa G. Pardue, and Shannan Martin. “What Do Parents Want Taught in Sex Education Programs?” heritage.org . 28 Jan. 2004. 17 Dec. 2008 <http://www.heritage.org/ ‌ research/ ‌ abstinence/ ‌ bg1722.cfm>. </li></ul><ul><li>“ Sex and Pregnancy Among Teens.” guttmacher.org . Dec. 2006. Guttmacher Institute. 17 Dec. 2008 <http://www.guttmacher.org/ ‌ pubs/ ‌ fb_sexEd2006.html>. </li></ul><ul><li>Wong, Alan S. L. “What Should be Taught in Sex Education?” vtaide.com . Oct. 2008. 17 Dec. 2008 <http://www.vtaide.com/ ‌ blessing/ ‌ s </li></ul>

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