New Forms Of Communication: Harnessing Collective Knowledge through Web Logs
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New Forms Of Communication: Harnessing Collective Knowledge through Web Logs

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This PowerPoint offers a brief history of Web logs (blogs) and potential uses for institutions.

This PowerPoint offers a brief history of Web logs (blogs) and potential uses for institutions.

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    New Forms Of Communication: Harnessing Collective Knowledge through Web Logs New Forms Of Communication: Harnessing Collective Knowledge through Web Logs Presentation Transcript

    • New Forms of Communication : Harnessing Collective Knowledge through Web Logs Bryan Loar Presented at the Art Libraries Society of North America’s 35 th Annual Conference April 29, 2007
    • INTRO
      • Bryan Loar
      • Resource Librarian
      • Fitch
      • 2006 MLIS Kent State University
      • 2005 BA History of Art, Ohio State University
      • 2005 BA Italian, Ohio State University
      • Fitch
      • A Global Design Agency
    • INTRO
      • Bryan Loar
      • Senior Site Administrator of
      • Ar t
      • Li brary
      • S tudents &
      • N ew
      • A RLIS*
      • P rofessionals
      • (ArLiSNAP)
      • www.arlisnap.org
    • BLOGS – Are Not Just… Online Journals Places for Self-Proclaimed Nerds Vehicles for Rants
    • BLOGS – Are Not Just… Online Journals Places for Self-Proclaimed Nerds Vehicles for Rants Me Circa 2001
    • BLOGS – So What?
      • Blogs Can Be
      • Forums
      • Collaboration Tools
      • Repositories of Knowledge
      • Connectors to New Knowledge
      • Efficient Professional Development Tools
      • Today’s Blogs Are
      • Economical
      • Easy to Set-Up
      • Easy to Maintain
      • Easily Configurable
    • BLOGS - Statistics
      • An inferred 57 million adults read blogs daily
        • Pew Internet & American Life Project, 2006 1
      • An inferred 12 million adults maintain a blog.
        • Pew Internet & American Life Project, 2006 2
      • Over 175,000 blogs are created every day
        • Technorati, 2007 3
      • Bloggers are more likely to be youthful
        • Pew Internet & American Life Project, 2006 4
    • BLOGS – A Brief History Partially adapted from Lena Karlsson’s account 5 Wordpress Moveable Type (MT) Blogger J ørn Barger, Weblog Filter Weblogs Online Journals 2002 1998 1997 1996 RSS 2.0 MetaWeblog API Six Apart 2003 2001 1999 1995
    • BLOGS – Community & Collaboration
      • Miami University (OH, USA)
        • Integrating Technology and Education Practicum (I-TEP) 6
      • Montgomery College (MD, USA)
        • Center for Teaching & Learning (CTL) 7
      • University of Warwick (Coventry, UK)
        • Academic Weblog System 8
    • BLOGS - ArLiSNAP
      • Community
        • Sharing Experiences
          • Conferences
          • Events
        • Support
          • Forum
          • Advice
        • Belonging
          • A Common Thread
          • Beyond the Blog
    • BLOGS - ArLiSNAP
      • Innovation
        • New Technologies in Use
          • De.licio.us
          • Flickr
          • Platial
          • FeedBurner
        • Discover New Ideas
        • Challenge Old & New Concepts
    • BLOGS - ArLiSNAP
      • Empowerment
        • 1 Blog - Many Voices
        • Equal Opportunity
        • Motivational
        • Activism
        • Information Becomes Knowledge
    • BLOGS – Start Your Own!
      • Things to Consider
        • Determine a topic and stick to it
        • Know your audience
        • Choose a format to meet your objective(s)
        • Find the best Web publishing software for your needs
        • Promote
      Partially adapted from Keidra Chaney’s suggestions 9
    • CONCLUSION
      • Blogs
        • Are Powerful Collaboration Tools
        • Archive knowledge
        • Build a sense of community
        • Give a everyone a voice
      Harness Users’ Collective Knowledge
    • ArLiSNAP – Swag! Buttons Flyers
    • STEAL THIS POWERPOINT
      • www.bryan.theloars.com
      OK, some conditions apply. Attribution, Non-Commercial, No Derivatives Creative Commons License applies.
    • REFERENCES
      • 1. Lenhart, A., & Fox, S. (2006). Bloggers: A Portrait of the Internet's New Storytellers. Pew Internet & American Life Project . Retrieved April 22, 2007, from http://www.pewinternet.org/pdfs/PIP%20Bloggers%20Report%20July%2019%202006.pdf .
      • 2. Ibid.
      • 3. Technorati (2007). About Us . Retrieved April 22, 2007, from http://www.technorati.com/about/ .
      • 4. Id.
      • 5. Karlsson, L. (2006). The Diary Weblog and the Travelling Tales of Diasporic Tourists. Journal of Intercultural Studies, 27 (3), 299-312. Retrieved April 25, 2007, from the Sociological Collection database.
      • 6. Dickey, M. (2004). The impact of web-logs (blogs) on student perceptions of isolation and alienation in a web-based distance-learning environment. Open Learning , 19 (3), 279-291. Retrieved April 25, 2007, from the Academic Search Premier database.
      • 7. Shaffer, S., Lackey, S., & Bolling, G. (2006). Blogging as a Venue for Nurse Faculty Development. Nursing Education Perspectives , 27 (3), 126-128. Retrieved April 09, 2007, from the Academic Search Premier database.
      • 8. Gordon, S. (2006). Rise of the blog [journal-based Website]. IEE Review , 52 (3), 32-35. Retrieved April 09, 2007, from the Academic Search Premier database.
      • 9. Chaney, K. (2005). Blogs-Learning a New Arts Learning Medium: So Far Neither Rare Nor Exactly Well Done. Teaching Artist Journal , 3 (4), 233-240. Retrieved April 22, 2007 from the Academic Search Premier database.
    • FURTHER READING
      • Blood, R. (2004). How Blogging Software RESHAPES THE ONLINE COMMUNITY. Communications of the ACM , 47 (12), 53-55.
      • Blood gives a good overview of the history of Web logs as well as Web logs’ technical development.
      • Butler, D. (2005). Science in the web age: Joint efforts. Nature , 438 (7068), 548-549.
      • Butler reports the reservations that the scientific community exhibits towards Web logs.
      • Deuze, M. (2006). Participation, Remediation, Bricolage: Considering Principal Components of a Digital Culture. Information Society , 22 (2), 63-75.
      • Deuze gives an in-depth analysis of online culture in particular to independent media (indymedia).
      • Holtz, S. (2006). Communicating in the world of Web 2.0. Communication World , 23 (3), 24-27.
      • Holtz gives a good overview of how we now live in a consumer-driven marketplace.
      • Karlsson, L. (2006). The Diary Weblog and the Travelling Tales of Diasporic Tourists. Journal of Intercultural Studies , 27 (3), 299-312.
      • Although I have already cited Karlsson’s paper, I did want to mention that it is a very insightful piece into Web logs as online journals.
      • Skinner, B. (2004). Web alert: news and views within healthcare -- managing the information overload. Quality in Primary Care , 12 (4), 289-292.
      • Skinner gives good insights into Really Simple Syndication (RSS)’s potential.