Rainwater Harvesting & Condesate Recovery(Presentation Format)
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Rainwater Harvesting & Condesate Recovery(Presentation Format)

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Rainwater Harvesting and Condensate Recovery techniques are new tools critical to developing a sustainable environment.

Rainwater Harvesting and Condensate Recovery techniques are new tools critical to developing a sustainable environment.

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Rainwater Harvesting & Condesate Recovery(Presentation Format) Rainwater Harvesting & Condesate Recovery(Presentation Format) Presentation Transcript

  • Rainwater Harvesting & Condensate Recovery New Tools for Sustainable Site Development By Tom Barrett May 2009
  • Green • Water • Infrastructure Green • Water • Infrastructure Green • Water • Infrastructure Green • Water • Infrastructure Green • Water • Infrastructure
  • Untapped Reservoir Untapped Reservoir Untapped Reservoir Untapped Reservoir Untapped Reservoir
  • How Much Rain Falls in Chicago? January - 1.86" Image of Rain Falling February - 1.58" March - 2.59" April - 3.28" May - 3.75" June - 4.08" July - 3.39" August - 3.38" September - 2.91" October - 2.65" November - 2.09" December - 1.88" Total 33.44"
  • Thirty Year Average Monthly Rain Fall Chicago (1971 - 2000) 5.00 4.50 4.00 3.50 3.00 Inches 2.50 2.00 1.50 1.00 0.50 0.00 January February March April May June July August September October November December Month Graph of Chicago Rain Fall
  • How Much Water Falls in Chicago? 2,500 sq. ft. Roof January - 2,727 gallons Image of Rain Falling February - 2,540 March - 4,130 April - 5,735 May - 5,268 June - 5,657 July - 5,470 August - 7,200 September - 5,096 October - 4,223 November - 4,691 December - 3,787 Total 56,525
  • How Much Water Falls in Chicago? ¼ Acre Residential Property January - 11,880 gallons Image of Rain Falling February - 11,065 March - 17,990 April - 24,982 May - 22,945 June - 24,642 July - 23,828 August - 31,363 September - 22,199 October - 18,397 November - 20,434 December - 16,496 Total 246,221
  • How Much Water Falls in Chicago? 3 Acre Commercial Property January - 142,560 gallons Image of Rain Falling February - 132,784 March - 215,876 April - 299,783 May - 275,344 June - 295,710 July - 285,934 August - 376,358 September - 266,383 October - 220,764 November - 245,203 December - 197,954 Total 2,954,654
  • How Much Water Falls in Chicago? City Block (660’ x 660’ – 10 acres) January - 475,195 gallons February - 442,610 March - 719,581 April - 999,267 May - 917,805 June - 985,690 July - 953,105 August - 1,254,515 September - 887,936 October - 735,873 November - 817,335 December - 659,842 Total 9,848,756
  • How Much Water is in Rain Event? ¼” Rain ½” Rain 1” Rain 2,500 ft. sq. 390 gallons 779 gallons 1,558 gallons Roof ¼ Acre 1,697 3,994 67,789 Residential Property 3 Acre 20,366 40,731 135,770 Commercial Property Chicago City 67,885 135,770 271,540 Block
  • What can we do with this water? • Flush Toilets • Wash Vehicles • Clean Sidewalks • Laundry • Water the Landscape
  • How Much Do We Use? Daily Monthly Annually Toilet - 19 gallons 570 6,840 Bathing - 15 450 5,400 Laundry - 8 240 2,880 Kitchen - 7 210 2,520 Housekeeping - 1 30 360 Total 50 1,500 18,000 The average household uses between 50 and 100 gallons of water per person per day.
  • How Much Water Does a Landscape Need in Chicago? January - 0.00" February - 0.00" March - 0.68" April - 2.01" May - 3.95" June - 5.89" July - 6.99" August - 6.07" September - 3.87" October - 2.08" November - 0.63" December - 0.00" Total 32.17"
  • What is the Problem? ET Rain Difference January - 0.00" 1.75" 1.75" February - 0.00" 1.63" 1.63" March - 0.68" 2.65" 1.97" April - 2.01" 3.68" 1.67" May - 3.95" 3.38" -0.57" June - 5.89" 3.63" -2.26" July - 6.99" 3.51" -3.48" August - 6.07" 4.62" -1.45" September - 3.87" 3.27" -0.60" October - 2.08" 2.71" 0.63" November - 0.63" 3.01" 2.38" December - 0.00" 2.43" 2.43" Total 32.17“ 36.27" 4.10"
  • Evapotranspiration (Chicago) 8 7 6 5 4 inches Evaportation 3 2 1 0 t ril y r er ly ne r ch ay y r us be be ar be ar Ju ob Ap M Ju ar ug nu em u em em M ct br -1 A Ja v ec O pt Fe No Se D Month Graph of Chicago Evapotranspiration
  • Precipatation (Chicago) 8.0 7.0 6.0 5.0 inches 4.0 Rain Fall 3.0 2.0 1.0 0.0 st ril y r er ly ne r ch ay ry r be be ar be gu Ju ob Ap ua M Ju ar nu m m em Au M ct br ve ce Ja O pt Fe No De Se Month Graph of Chicago Rain Fall & Evapotranspiration
  • ET vs. Precipatation (Chicgo) 8 6 4 2 Rain Fall inches Evaportation Difference 0 t il ry r r ly e r ch ay ry r us be be be be pr n Ju a ua M Ju ar ug A nu o em em m M ct br A te Ja ov ec O Fe ep -2 N D S -4 -6 Month Graph of Chicago Rain Fall & Evapotranspiration
  • Landscape Ecology Size the landscape to the 80% of the average rain water production. – Roof Runoff – Hardscape Runoff Balancing rain water to landscape creates a functional landscape that utilizes the site’s water production.
  • Stormwater Mitigation Stormwater Mitigation Stormwater Mitigation Stormwater Mitigation Stormwater Mitigation
  • Stormwater Mitigation – Collection runoff near the source – Slow it down – Soak it in – Filter it – Apply it to the landscape – Create habitats
  • Peak Flow (1 Acre Site) Grass Field Roof 1 Year Storm 1.4 cfs 4.3 cfs 2 Year Storm 2.1 cfs 5.4 cfs 10 Year Storm 4.3 cfs 8.0 cfs 25 Year Storm 5.7 cfs 9.5 cfs 100 Year Storm 8.0 cfs 12.0 cfs cfs – cubic feet per second
  • Peak Flow (1 Acre Site) Grass Field Roof 1 Year Storm 10.5 gps 32.2 gps 2 Year Storm 15.7 gps 40.4 gps 10 Year Storm 32.2 gps 59.8 gps 25 Year Storm 42.6 gps 71.1 gps 100 Year Storm 59.8 gps 89.8 gps gps – gallons per second
  • Peak Flow (1 Acre Site) Grass Field Roof 1 Year Storm 630 gpm 1,932 gpm 2 Year Storm 942 gpm 2,424 gpm 10 Year Storm 1,932 gpm 3,588 gpm 25 Year Storm 2,556 gpm 4,266 gpm 100 Year Storm 3,588 gpm 5,388 gpm gpm – gallons per minute
  • Peak Flow (2,500 sq. ft. Roof) Grass Field Roof 1 Year Storm 0.08 cfs 0.25 cfs 2 Year Storm 0.12 cfs 0.31 cfs 10 Year Storm 0.25 cfs 0.46 cfs 25 Year Storm 0.33 cfs 0.55 cfs 100 Year Storm 0.46 cfs 0.69 cfs cfs – cubic feet per second
  • Peak Flow (2,500 sq. ft. Roof) Grass Field Roof 1 Year Storm 0.60 gps 1.85 gps 2 Year Storm 0.90 gps 2.32 gps 10 Year Storm 1.85 gps 3.43 gps 25 Year Storm 2.44 gps 4.08 gps 100 Year Storm 3.43 gps 5.15 gps gps – gallons per second
  • Peak Flow (2,500 ft. sq. Roof) Grass Field Roof 1 Year Storm 36 gpm 111 gpm 2 Year Storm 54 gpm 139 gpm 10 Year Storm 111 gpm 206 gpm 25 Year Storm 147 gpm 245 gpm 100 Year Storm 206 gpm 309 gpm gpm – gallons per minute
  • Change in Peak Runoff Flow Before and after Development 250% 200% 150% 100% 50% 0% 1 Year Storm 2 Year Storm 10 Year 25 Year 100 Year Storm Storm Storm Stormwater Effects of Urbanization
  • Collection and Dispersal Collection Systems – Rain Barrels – Downspout Collection – Cisterns Dispersal Systems – Rain Gardens – Bioswales – Irrigation
  • Rain Barrels
  • Rain Barrels
  • Rain Barrels • Collect a small amount of water – 50 to 300 gallons • Can be unattractive • The water must be used
  • Downspout Collectors
  • Downspout Collectors Captures 90% of the rainwater
  • Cisterns Above Ground
  • Cisterns Below Ground
  • Putting It Together
  • Control Systems Sensors plus Logic Circuits Cistern Sensors • High Water – Disperse the water – Alarm • Irrigation Water – Reserve for landscape • Household Water – Minimum if household water use • Low Water l – Pump protection Irrigation System • Soil moisture
  • Drip Irrigation Systems 90% Efficiency Rating
  • Expanding Stormwater Detention Systems into Stormwater Retention Small increase in size Image of Growing Plant creates a large increase in volume. Small increase in cost delivers a large volume of water. Mitigates the ¼” to ½” rainfall events.
  • Condensation Untapped Reservoir Condensation Untapped Reservoir Condensation
  • HVAC Condensation • ½ gallon per hour per ton of air conditioning. • 1,000 ton air conditioner produces 8 gallons of water per minute. • Condensation production occurs when the landscape needs the water.
  • HVAC Condensation • ½ gallon per hour per ton of air conditioning. • One ton of air conditioning for every 700 sq. ft. of floor space. • One ton of air conditioning for every 5,600 cu. ft. of building volume.
  • Residential Condensation • 8 to 15 gallons of water per day. • 60 to 100 gallons per week. • 250 to 450 gallons per month.
  • Commercial Condensation • 15 gallons of water per minute. • 360 gallons of water per day. • 2,520 gallons of water per week. • 10,000 gallons of water a month.
  • Green • Water • Infrastructure Green • Water • Infrastructure Green • Water • Infrastructure Green • Water • Infrastructure Green • Water • Infrastructure
  • Untapped Reservoir Untapped Reservoir Untapped Reservoir Untapped Reservoir Untapped Reservoir
  • Questions? • Green Water Infrastructure • Strategic Planning • Marketing • Training Tom Barrett 104 Ash Circle Noblesville, Indiana 46062 (317) 773-3111 (317) 441-8703 cell Tom.Barrett@JTBarrett.com