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Graham Lavender on blogs and Twitter at Web 2.You 2010
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Graham Lavender on blogs and Twitter at Web 2.You 2010

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Graham Lavender's presentation from Web 2.You 2010 at McGill University: Blogs and Twitter for Individuals and Institutions

Graham Lavender's presentation from Web 2.You 2010 at McGill University: Blogs and Twitter for Individuals and Institutions

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  • 1. Blogs and Twitter
    for Individuals and Institutions
    Presented by
    Graham Lavender
    Liaison Librarian, McGill Library
    February 5, 2010
  • 2. http://www.flickr.com/photos/verityatthedisco/4193432039/
  • 3. Everything I know about blogging I learned from John Dupuis
  • 4.
    • Join the conversation
    • 5. Promote yourself
    Why blog (or use Twitter)?
  • 6. “A blog (a contraction of the term "web log") is a type of website, usually maintained by an individual with regular entries of commentary, descriptions of events, or other material such as graphics or video. Entries are commonly displayed in reverse-chronological order. "Blog" can also be used as a verb, meaning to maintain or add content to a blog.”
    - Wikipedia
    What is a blog?
  • 7. Top 10 Blogs
  • 8.
    • “Biblioblogosphere”
    • 9. LISWiki
    • 10. Walt Crawford’s Liblog Landscape
    LIS blogs
  • 11.
    • Currency
    • 12. Wide range of viewpoints
    • 13. Learn about the community
    Why you should read blogs
  • 14.
    • Ask your friends for recommendations
    The Annoyed Librarian
    Librarian in Black
    Information Wants to be Free
    LISNews
    • Blogrolls: read your favourite bloggers’ favourite blogs
    • 15. Set up an RSS feed reader
    • 16. Leave comments
    How to read blogs
  • 17. Individual (student or professional) blogs
    Multi-contributor blogs
    Institutional blogs
    Types of blogs
  • 18.
    • You are an exhibitionist
    • 19. You were inspired by a really excellent talk
    • 20. You enjoy writing
    • 21. You want to impress potential employers
    • 22. You want to become a participant in the online conversation
    Reasons to start your own blog
  • 23. Reasons to not start your own blog
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/remibridot/2218573670/
  • 24.
  • 25. Creating a blog
    • My advice: sign up for a free account at WordPress
  • My Blog
    http://inspiredlibraryschoolstudent.wordpress.com/
  • 26.
    • Have a focus
    • 27. Write at least two interesting posts before you start advertising
    • 28. Don’t obsess over the layout at first
    • 29. Advertise, advertise, advertise
    starting your own blog
  • 30.
    • Start with your friends, classmates, colleagues
    • 31. Add yourself to the LISWiki
    • 32. Leave comments on other blogs, especially ones on a similar topic
    • 33. Write posts linking to posts from other blogs
    • 34. Add your URL to your email signature and business card
    Advertising your blog
  • 35.
    • Visit your favourite blogs, and try to discover some new ones
    • 36. Don't worry that you always have to be 100% original and groundbreaking
    • 37. Solicit guest posts
    • 38. Don't take yourself too seriously
    Staying Motivated
  • 39.
    • Professionals want to help you
    • 40. Your blog can set you apart
    • 41. Start thinking and writing about the trends and issues they don't teach in school
    • 42. You have more to say than you think
    For students
  • 43.
  • 44. Types:
    • Association blogs
    • 45. Institutional blogs
    • 46. Conference blogs
    Re:Generations Blog
    Advantages:
    • Interaction among contributors
    • 47. Broad audience
    • 48. Less pressure to post frequently
    Multi-Contributor blogs
  • 49. McGill Library has two blogs:
    • The McGill Library Blog (for students, faculty, and other clients)
    • 50. The McGill Library Staff Blog (for McGill Library staff)
    McGill Library blogs
  • 51. McGill Library blog (for clients)
    http://blogs.mcgill.ca/library/
  • 52. McGill Library Staff Blog
  • 53.
    • Prepare a business case
    • 54. Advertise, advertise, advertise
    • 55. Start with a small group of people who are ready and willing to post
    • 56. Create guidelines
    • 57. Get support from the top
    • 58. Don’t worry that it will be as hard to maintain as a website
    Lessons Learned: the McGill Library Experience
  • 59. Microblogging (Twitter)
    Micro = very small
    Blogging = blogging
  • 60.
    • I wrote about Web 2.You on my blog
    • 61. I blogged about Web 2.You
    But
    • I wrote about Web 2.You on Twitter
    • 62. I tweeted about Web 2.You
    Word usage
  • 63. http://www.qwantz.com/index.php?comic=1417
  • 64.
    • Like blogging, but each post is limited to 140 characters
    • 65. Popular with celebrities and “celebrities”
    • 66. Post to Twitter through text message, browser, or desktop application
    Lifehacker’s Five Best Twitter Clients
    Twitter
  • 67. Let’s try it out
  • 68. Twitter is:
    • More immediate
    • 69. More ubiquitous
    • 70. Less flexible in terms of length
    • 71. Less flexible in terms of content
    Why not do both?
    Twitter vs. Blogging
  • 72.
    • What I’m doing right now
    • 73. What I’m going to be doing in the near future
    • 74. What my friends are doing now/in the near future
    • 75. What you should be doing now/in the near future
    Twitter for individuals
  • 76.
    • McGill Library’s Twitter account
    • 77. Promote new services and events
    • 78. Interact directly with students (examples: #1, #2)
    At McGill:
    • Tweet while working on chat reference
    • 79. Cheat sheet of possible tweets
    • 80. Training (more than you might expect)
    Twitter for Institutions
  • 81.
    • Accept that it will be scary
    • 82. Use it to join the conversation
    • 83. Use it to promote yourself
    • 84. There’s nothing stopping you – DO IT!
    Conclusion
  • 85. Thank you!
    Look me up online:
    The Inspired Library School Student
    Twitter: @guybrariang
    My shared items on Google Reader
    Facebook
    LinkedIn
    Flickr
    Thank You

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