• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Mangroves power point
 

Mangroves power point

on

  • 14,354 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
14,354
Views on SlideShare
14,327
Embed Views
27

Actions

Likes
4
Downloads
675
Comments
3

4 Embeds 27

http://www.slideshare.net 11
http://plc.edmodo.com 9
http://www.edmodo.com 6
http://plc.edu.edmodo.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel

13 of 3 previous next Post a comment

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
  • v good
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
  • Great Powerpoint to share the basics about Mangroves - Thank you
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
  • Informative
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Mangroves power point Mangroves power point Presentation Transcript

    • Mangroves
      • salt-tolerant, woody trees – really land plants
      • flowering plants - with true roots, stems, and leaves
      • warm, tropical and sub-tropical regions
      • cover 60 – 75% of tropical shores
      • found in protected, coastal areas
      • intertidal
      • where salt marshes would be in temperate zone
      • salty, muddy water
      • anaerobic sediments
    • Functions:
      • protect coastal lands from storms and erosion
      • filter runoff
      • accrete
      • sediments
      • gradually extend land seaward – eventually replaced by land plants = ecological succession
      Functions:
    • Habitat Value:
      • very important for
      • other organisms
      • epiphytic organisms live on prop roots:
      • sponges, tunicates, worms, anemones, snails, crabs, shrimp, lobster
    • Habitat Value:
      • some species live in mud:
      • crabs, mudskippers (Pacific)
    • Habitat Value:
      • many juvenile coral reef fish live here (later move to reef)
      • food and protection from predators among roots
    • Habitat Value:
      • many birds nest in branches away from land predators:
      • egrets, doves, pelicans, etc
    • Zonation
      • four main types in Caribbean:
      • red, black, white, buttonwood – moving inland
    • different types of mangroves
    •  
    • Red Mangrove
      • most prominent
      • large prop roots
      • anchor trees in soft mud
      • stabilize and trap
      • sediments
      • grow down from
      • branches into water
      • up to 30 ft. tall
    • Red Mangrove
      • thick, waxy leaves - reduce water loss
      • exclude salt at roots
    • Red Mangroves
      • pencil seeds - germinate while still attached to the tree
      • pointy – if low tide - falls into mud, sticks there, grows
      • if high tide - floats to other areas
    • Black Mangroves
      • next inland
      • snorkel roots – ( pneumatophores )
      • - environment more severe than red mangrove
      • - anaerobic mud – high decomp.
      • - roots grow upward
      • - obtain oxygen from air above - act as straws
    • Black Mangroves
    • Black Mangroves
      • salt pores (glands) - secrete excess salt from plant
      • can sometimes see salt crystals - leaves covered with salt
    • White Mangroves
      • farthest from water
      • cannot tolerate
      • flooding
    • White Mangroves
      • excrete salt from leaves and at base of stem – salt glands
    • Buttonwood
      • not true mangrove, but mangrove associate
    • Human Uses
      • protect coastal lands from storms and erosion, filter runoff
      • ex: tsunami
      • - where mangroves removed – land destroyed
      • - where mangroves remained – land protected
    • Human Uses
      • cutting to make charcoal
      • honey from flowers
      • medicine - from bark
      • dyes - from bark
      • cattle feed - leaves
    • Human Impacts
      • half of world’s mangroves destroyed – more in Southeast asia
      • cut to make marinas - destroys habitat and increases erosion
    • Human Impacts
      • filled in land - for development
      • ex: St. Thomas racetrack built on filled in mangroves
      • broken when boats tie to them
      • cut for charcoal
    • Human Impacts
      • destroyed for shrimp mariculture – for ponds
      • mangroves are a critical habitat to be restored