Research mockingbird

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Research mockingbird

  1. 1. Right now the governor's announced school funding cuts are just proposals, but the schools know big cuts are headed their way. And for the first time in a long time, the cuts are much more likely not to just impact school programs, they could well mean teacher layoffs in several districts. With 85,000 students, the Jefferson County School District is the largest in the state, and has more than 4,000 teachers. The state wants the district to slash $7 million from its budget. Other metro-area schools are facing similar proposed cuts: in Denver, $7.2 million; Douglas County, $4.9 million; Cherry Creek, $4.3 million; and Aurora schools, $2.9 million. It's not all bad news. Colorado could receive more than $400 million in school funding from the federal economic stimulus package. But no one is counting on it for sure, and what the state gets could come with strings attached for specific programs. It might not be money earmarked to go straight back into the classrooms. http://cbs4denver.com/local/schools.budget.cuts.2.920632.html The education funding reductions would be divided up almost equally between the state's universities and colleges and K-12 institutions. Saliman said Ritter wants to cut $125 million from K-12 education and $100 million from higher education. The K-12 cuts would include suspension of a second enrollment count for military dependents, which could cost school districts as much as $1.8 million per year, a reduction of $2.5 million in charter school construction assistance, and a reduction of $17.9 million in the planned expansion of Colorado's full-day kindergarten program. 6. Elimination of all funding for the Colorado Student Before and After School Program, which would save $300,000 http://www.examiner.com/x-2819-Denver-Statehouse-Examiner~y2009m1d28-Ritter- suggests-more-cuts-for-FY-2009 Superintendent Cindy Stevenson learned Tuesday that she likely can expect at least $7 million less in state funding for the 2009-10 school year. Wednesday, the federal stimulus package, which contains an estimated $23.4 million for Jeffco schools next year, was approved by the U.S. House of Representatives and is headed to the Senate. But because the federal funds come with strings attached, it's not an even trade. The stimulus funds are earmarked for construction, high-poverty schools and children with special needs. Colorado school districts would receive an estimated $414.8 million of federal funds over two years under the economic stimulus plan approved Wednesday by the U.S. House. The dollars come with strings attached, so school leaders say they likely won't directly offset
  2. 2. the state school budget cuts proposed Tuesday. * EXAMPLE 1: Jefferson County Public Schools 2009-10 total: $23.4 million Breakdown * $10.6 million for construction * $8.4 million for special education * $4.3 million for high-poverty programs 2010-11 total: $14.5 million Breakdown * $10.2 million for special education * $4.3 million for high-poverty programs * Total two-year increase: $37.9 million * EXAMPLE 2: Denver Public Schools 2009-10 total: $54.9 million Breakdown * $31.1 million for construction * $8.9 million for special education * $14.7 million for high-poverty programs 2010-11 total: $25.6 million Breakdown * $10.9 million for special education * $14.7 million for high-poverty programs * Total two-year increase: $80.6 million http://m.rockymountainnews.com/news/2009/jan/29/stimulus-to-help-taut-schools/ In other words, the average low-poverty not special ed student’s school only gets money
  3. 3. for construction (if they even need it). *** Even with $126 million in cuts being proposed for Colorado’s k-12 schools, the state’s education funding is still increasing - as is required by state statute. In fiscal year 2008-09, the state appropriated $3.4 billion for education. Ritter’s proposal for 2009-10 recommends $3.5 billion - just a hair less (if a hair is worth $126 million) than the $3.6 billion initially requested. Most of the cut, or $70 million, comes from a modification in how the state determines cost of living, rolling that amount back to levels from fiscal year 2000-01. The cuts affect school districts differently, based on their cost of living. “We are extremely concerned about the budget cuts and their effect on our students,” Boasberg said. “It only further heightens our concern about accomplishing the PERA merger to put us on more equal financial footing with other school district.” - Denver Public Schools, $7.2 million - Jefferson County, $7 million - Douglas County, $4.9 million - Cherry Creek, $4.3 million - Adams 12, $3.2 million - Aurora, $2.9 million - Colorado Springs D-11, $2.7 million - Boulder, $2.6 million - St. Vrain, $2.2 million - Poudre, $2.2 million http://blogs.denverpost.com/coloradoclassroom/2009/01/

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