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Mem Brief Csi Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Canadian Sugar Institute Canadian Sugar Institute WSRO Member Briefing June 2009 Canadian Sugar Institute
  • 2. About the Canadian Sugar Industry Cane sugar refining Sugar beet processing Blending and packaging Bl di d k i Canadian Sugar Institute
  • 3. Canadian Sugar Production/Consumption Metric Tonnes 1,600 Thousands 1,400 , 1,200 Domestic Disappearance 1,000 1 000 800 600 400 200 0 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 198 198 198 198 198 198 198 199 199 199 199 199 199 199 199 199 199 200 200 200 200 200 200 200 200 200 Canadian Sugar Institute
  • 4. Canadian Sugar Production/Consumption Metric Tonnes 1,600 Thousands 1,400 , Domestic Disappearance D i Di 1,200 Adjusted for Trade with US  1,000 1 000 in Sugar‐Containing  i S C t i i Products 800 600 400 200 0 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 198 198 198 198 198 198 198 199 199 199 199 199 199 199 199 199 199 200 200 200 200 200 200 200 200 200 Canadian Sugar Institute
  • 5. Threats to Consumption • International Trade ... Another presentation p • Consumer Opinion – Tracking Study • Obesity  global and national pressures Obesity – global and national pressures • Substitute sweeteners • Government policy – food guides, school  Government policy food guides school policies, restricted sale and promotion of  “unhealthy” foods (sugar, fat, salt) unhealthy foods (sugar, fat, salt) • Food labelling and advertising – negative sugar  claims Canadian Sugar Institute
  • 6. Classification of Eating Patterns 60 Somewhat concerned  about my weight but  b i h b 50 not on weight reducing  diet Watch what I eat for  40 nutritional reasons but  not concerned about  my weight 30 Eat whatever I want  Eat whatever I want and enjoy 20 On a diet and trying to  O di t d t i t 10 lose weight 0 Canadian Sugar Institute
  • 7. Importance of limiting food  ingredients 5.5 5 Fat Salt 4.5 Sugar 4 Sugar substitutes Carbohydrates 3.5 3 1985 1987 1989 1991 1994 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 2006 2007 Q. Q …For each one, I would like you to tell me how important you feel it is to limit the amount of that ingredient that f f you eat in order to maintain health…What number would you say indicates how important or unimportant it is for good health to limit…? (6 = very important to limit; 1 = not at all important) Canadian Sugar Institute
  • 8. Fat versus sugar 5.5 1996 /98 Low  carbohydrate  Diets (The  ( Fat 5 1985 – 1996 Low fat focus in  Zone, Sugar  dietary  Busters) guidelines, diets, media, low  4.5 fat products Sugar 4 3.5 3 1985 1987 1989 1991 1994 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 2006 2007 Q. Q …For each one, I would like you to tell me how important you feel it is to limit the amount of that ingredient that f f you eat in order to maintain health…What number would you say indicates how important or unimportant it is for good health to limit…? (6 = very important to limit; 1 = not at all important) Canadian Sugar Institute
  • 9. Overall attitudes to sugar 60 50 Not good for  you but no harm  in moderation 40 Good in  30 moderation 20 Bad for you and  should avoid should avoid 10 0 Canadian Sugar Institute
  • 10. Obesity, calories and weight 80 Canadians eat too much  70 sugar 60 Sugar provides empty  calories 50 40 Too much sugar can  cause diabetes 30 Sugar causes obesity 20 10 I am concerned about  0 sugar causing my  1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 children to put on too  children to put on too much weight Canadian Sugar Institute
  • 11. Sugar, fat, calories and labelling 45 40 Foods labelled ‘no added  35 sugar’ are better for you 30 25 It’s more important to  look for labels about fat  20 than labels about sugar g 15 Sugar has half the  10 calories of fat calories of fat 5 0 1987 7 1988 8 1989 9 1990 0 1991 1 1992 2 1993 3 1994 4 1995 5 1996 6 1997 7 1998 8 1999 9 2000 0 2001 1 2002 2 2003 3 2004 4 2005 5 2006 6 2007 7 Canadian Sugar Institute
  • 12. Sugar knowledge 60 50 Sugar is an natural  product 40 30 Sugar is a  carbohydrate 20 Sugar is a good  10 source of energy 0 Canadian Sugar Institute
  • 13. Canadian Sugar Institute Strategy MISSION Advocate for a healthy sugar industry Advocate for a healthy sugar industry International Trade  Advocacy Nutrition Advocacy and Communications Influence Government and other  Inform and Educate Consumers Stakeholders Informed Opinion  Proactive Advocacy Leaders Canadian Sugar Institute
  • 14. Nutrition Communications Objectives Government Opinion Leaders and Media Opinion Leaders and Media • Limited use and strict criteria  • Target widely held myths  to control use of negative  about sugar as education  sugar claims goals and position in the  goals and position in the context of healthy eating and  • Federal and provincial  general health/ lifestyle  g guidelines and materials do  issues not advocate reduced sugar  • Develop target group specific  consumption messages that are  • Federal guidelines permit use Federal guidelines permit use  positive, unbranded and  positive unbranded and of "natural” to promote  reinforce moderation sugar • Develop target group specific  programs and materials programs and materials Canadian Sugar Institute
  • 15. Nutrition Communications Strategy #1 CREDIBILITY Position and increase awareness of CSI as a credible  information leader on sugar and health. information leader on sugar and health. • Staff credentials • Scientific Information Scientific Information • Sugar in context of all “sugars” and carbohydrate • Academic Advisors Academic Advisors Canadian Sugar Institute
  • 16. Nutrition Communications Strategy • Position and increase awareness of CSI as a  credible information leader on sugar and health • Maximize use of partnerships and build Maximize use of partnerships and build  strategic alliances • Maximize use of third party support and Maximize use of third party support and  spokespersons Canadian Sugar Institute
  • 17. Key  Tactics • Scientific Advisory Committee • Professional memberships and committees p • Research projects • Students • Website, email broadcast, button ads bi il b d b d • Conferences • Publications mass mailings Publications mass mailings • Media monitoring and outreach • Food industry liaison and collaboration • Monitor and influence government policy/regulations: – guidelines, claims, labelling – collaborate with scientific advisors opinion leaders collaborate with scientific advisors, opinion leaders Canadian Sugar Institute
  • 18. Key  Tactics • Scientific Advisory Committee • Professional memberships and committees f l b h d • Research projects – Sugar consumption – Statistics Canada – Sugar cubes and hypoglycemia treatment g yp g y – In‐depth analysis of Sugar Tracking Study • Students Canadian Sugar Institute
  • 19. Website, button ads for professionals Canadian Sugar Institute
  • 20. Email broadcast Canadian Sugar Institute
  • 21. Conferences/sponsorship Canadian Sugar Institute
  • 22. Publications/mass mailings Canadian Sugar Institute
  • 23. Key  Tactics • Media monitoring and outreach • Food industry liaison and collaboration d d l d ll b • Monitor and influence government policy/  regulations: – guidelines, claims, labelling – collaborate with scientific advisors, opinion leaders Canadian Sugar Institute
  • 24. Monitor and influence government policy 2003:  New Criteria for the Nutrient Content Claim "No Added Sugars“ 1. the food contains no added sugars and no ingredients containing added sugars or  On January 1 2003 Healthcontain sugars that functionally substitute for added sugars; ingredients that contain sugars that functionally substitute for added sugars; ingredients that Canada published amendments to the Food and Drug Regulations regarding nutrition On January 1, 2003, Health Canada published amendments to the Food and Drug Regulations regarding nutrition  labelling, nutrient content claims and diet‐related health claims. Manufacturers, importers and other responsible  2. parties had until December 12, 2005 (or for small manufacturers until December 12, 2007) to comply with the new  the sugars content is not increased through some other means except if the  regulations. The Food and Drugs Act and Regulations apply to all foods sold in Canada, as well as to food advertising.  functional effect is not to increase the sugars content of the food; and The amended regulations include specific compositional and labelling criteria for a restricted list of permitted  nutrient content and health claims, including the “no added sugars” claim. 3. The the similar criteria a food must meet in order addedthe "no added sugars" claim are: the similar reference food contains added sugars. compositional reference food contains to carry sugars. The compositional criteria a food must meet in order to carry the  no added sugars claim are: 1) the food contains no added sugars1 and no ingredients containing added sugars or ingredients that contain sugars  As stated in the Regulatory Impact Analysis Statement that accompanied the  that functionally substitute for added sugars2; amendments to the Food and Drug Regulations published in January 2003 in Canada  2) the sugars content is not increased through some other means except if the functional effect is not to increase the  sugars content of the food; and Gazette Part II, one objective of the amendments is to ensure that nutrient content  ) g 3) the similar reference food contains added sugars. claims are not deceptive. The “no added sugar” claim was frequently identified by  As stated in the Regulatory Impact Analysis Statement that accompanied the amendments to the Food and Drug  consumers as deceptive prior to these amendments. The purpose of this claim is not to  Regulations published in January 2003 in Canada Gazette Part II, one objective of the amendments is to ensure that  distinguish between “natural” and “refined” sugars since, from a nutritional point of  nutrient content claims are not deceptive. The “no added sugar” claim was frequently identified by consumers as  deceptive prior to these amendments. The purpose of this claim is not to distinguish between “natural” and  view,  sugars include allnutritionaland disaccharidesinclude all mono and disaccharides whether view, “sugars” include all mono and disaccharides whether or not they have been or not refined sugars since from a mono point of view sugars whether or not they have been “refined” sugars since, from a nutritional point of view, “sugars” include all mono and disaccharides whether or not  they have been extracted from cane or provided by fruit juices. The regulation is specifically worded to address cases  extracted from cane or provided by fruit juices. The regulation is specifically worded to  such as those where cane sugar is replaced by concentrated fruit juice. This claim is of particular interest to people  with diabetes who have to monitor sugar intake. A deceptive claim could have health implications. address cases such as those where cane sugar is replaced by concentrated fruit juice.  This claim is of particular interest to people with diabetes who have to monitor sugar  intake. A deceptive claim could have health implications. i k Ad i l i ld h h l h i li i Canadian Sugar Institute
  • 25. Monitor and influence government policy Sugar Claims Pre - 2005 2005 onwards sugar-free < 0.25% available carbohydrate < 0.5 g sugars per reference amount free of energy free of energy (< 1cal/100 g). (< 5 cal per reference amount). reduced in sugar > 25% less sugars and > 25% less sugars and > 5 g less sugars/serving > 5 g less sugars/reference amount. no increase in energy. no added sugar no added sucrose, but may contain sucrose no added sugars, no ingredients sugars other sugars (honey, molasses, fruit containing added sugars or ingredients juice, fructose, glucose). If other sugars, that contain sugars that substitute for must state “sweetened with...” added sugars. unsweetened Contains no added sucrose or other Meets requirements for “no added sugar” sugars. and contains no sweeteners. d t i t light < 2 g sugars/serving; < 10% sugars on a Not permitted low in sugar dry basis. low carbohydrate < 2 g available carbohydrate/serving; < Not permitted 10% available carbohydrate. carbohydrate carbohydrate-reduced Only for foods for special dietary use; < Not permitted 50% available carbohydrate normally in that food when not carbohydrate- reduced. No increase in energy. source of complex > 10 g starch/serving. Not permitted carbohydrate Canadian Sugar Institute
  • 26. Discretionary Fortification CANADA Review of Canadian policy started in 1998 …  2002 Consultation ‐ Options • Excludes foods containing defined amount of nutrients or substances  with known risk to health. i.e. excludes foods containing >2 g  saturated and trans fat; sodium >480 mg; alcohol>0.5% • Excludes foods that are not consistent with healthy eating  recommendations (excludes sugary foods such as candies and  cookie). i.e. excludes foods above and those with <10%  cookie) i e excludes foods above and those with <10% recommended nutrient intake for at least one nutrient • Excludes certain standardized staple foods. i.e.  flours, breads, pastas, rice, milk, margarine, and may stand alone or  , ,p , , , g , y applied in combination with the above two options • Excludes water and zero calorie beverages and may be applied in  combination with all above options Canadian Sugar Institute
  • 27. Discretionary Fortification CANADA Proposed new policy 2005 Certain standardized and staple foods which are pervasive in the food supply  would be excluded from regulated discretionary fortification to guard against  ld b l d df l d di i f ifi i d i excessive nutrient intakes. Examples include  flour, bread, pasta, rice, milk, butter, sugar, and salt. (Note, some of the foods  are already fortified under specific regulatory requirements.) Fresh fruits and  are already fortified under specific regulatory requirements ) Fresh fruits and vegetables, eggs, nuts, fresh meat, fish, and poultry, would also be excluded  from regulated discretionary fortification because these foods already are  good sources of one or more nutrients naturally occurring. Research also  shows that consumers want a choice of unfortified foods, including those that  are already healthy. Canadian Sugar Institute
  • 28. Protecting What We’ve Earned ‐ NATURAL Canadian Sugar Institute
  • 29. How do we measure success? • Information service monitoring/measurement • Government policy – moderate through Government policy  moderate through  collaboration/education/crisis prevention • Labelling claims – fewer negative claims and more  restrictions on claims l • Media requests/interviews • H lth Health professional and voluntary organization  f i l d l t i ti policies and programs neutral (or less negative) to  g sugar • CSI consulted more frequently as the information  leader on sugar and health Canadian Sugar Institute
  • 30. How do we measure success? • Information service monitoring/measurement • Government policy – moderate through Government policy  moderate through  collaboration/education/crisis prevention • Labelling claims – fewer negative claims and more  restrictions on claims l • Media requests/interviews • H lth Health professional and voluntary organization  f i l d l t i ti policies and programs neutral (or less negative) to  g sugar • CSI consulted more frequently as the information  leader on sugar and health Canadian Sugar Institute