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Module 6 Linear Slide Show - CGaither
Module 6 Linear Slide Show - CGaither
Module 6 Linear Slide Show - CGaither
Module 6 Linear Slide Show - CGaither
Module 6 Linear Slide Show - CGaither
Module 6 Linear Slide Show - CGaither
Module 6 Linear Slide Show - CGaither
Module 6 Linear Slide Show - CGaither
Module 6 Linear Slide Show - CGaither
Module 6 Linear Slide Show - CGaither
Module 6 Linear Slide Show - CGaither
Module 6 Linear Slide Show - CGaither
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Module 6 Linear Slide Show - CGaither

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  • 1.  
  • 2. <ul><li>Teaching Historical Thinking </li></ul><ul><li>Using Primary Sources in the Primary Grades </li></ul><ul><li>Using Primary Sources on the Internet To Teach and Learn History </li></ul><ul><li>Conclusion </li></ul>
  • 3. <ul><li>Based on Samuel Wineburg’s empirical studies which compared the way historians think about primary and secondary sources with the thinking processes of high school students and teachers </li></ul><ul><li>In order to teach a strong understanding of history, students must use sourcing and corroboration heuristic with first/second/third order documents </li></ul>NEXT
  • 4. <ul><li>Teachers should first discuss the first order document with students and ask them to suspend judgments about the past while trying to understand the context of the document </li></ul><ul><li>Then introduce additional documents, the Second Order, which relate to the first order document </li></ul><ul><li>Finally, students are invited to find Third Order documents on their own that pertain to their inquiry about the historical topic being discussed </li></ul>NEXT
  • 5. <ul><li>What I learned from Frederick Drake’s article is summarized in his quote: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ If we expect our students to think historically, we need teachers who can direct them toward historical thinking and consequent understanding of history. “ </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Drake, Frederick D. (2003). Teaching Historical Thinking. Retrieved from ERIC Digest Database . http://www.ericdigests.org/2003-2/historical.html </li></ul>BACK TO MENU
  • 6. <ul><li>Evelyn Otten’s article explained the historical understanding of time among elementary children through the use of archival photographs. Even the youngest children made some basic distinction in historical time and as the children matured, such distinctions of time became more sophisticated in concept. The students' ability to place the photographs in proper time sequence based on visual cues indicates a significant body of understanding of historical chronology. The researchers recommend that study of history in the elementary grades &quot;might productively focus on helping students refine and extend the knowledge they have gained about history.  </li></ul>NEXT
  • 7. <ul><li>Types of primary sources include: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>print documents </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>electronic media </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>arts -- graphic and fine </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>folklore, folkways, and mythology </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>physical environment and material culture (built environment and artifacts) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>By introducing primary sources in the classroom, students can question, explore, research, and draw links to the distant past in a fresh and creative way </li></ul>NEXT
  • 8. <ul><li>Evelyn Otten’s article showed me that teaching history using primary sources is a interactive and engaging way to link the “people” in the classroom with the people who created the primary sources </li></ul><ul><li>Otten, Evelyn H. (1999). Using Primary Sources in the Primary Grades. Retrieved from ERIC Digest Database. http://www.ericdigests.org/1999-1/primary.html </li></ul>BACK TO MENU
  • 9. <ul><li>Primary sources are the building blocks of history </li></ul><ul><li>These traces of the human past include ideals, customs, institutions, languages, literature, material products, and the physical remains of various people </li></ul><ul><li>A commonly overlooked type of primary source is historic places, the sites of significant events, which communicate the past to students in numerous ways </li></ul>NEXT
  • 10. <ul><li>Verified primary sources online: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>American Memory Historical Collections for the National Digital Library </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Eye Witness: History Through The Eyes Of Those Who Lived It </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Euro Docs: Primary Historical Documents From Western Europe </li></ul></ul>NEXT
  • 11. <ul><li>I learned that as students work with primary sources, they have the opportunity to do more than just absorb information; they can also analyze, evaluate, recognize bias and contradiction, and weigh the significance of evidence presented by the source </li></ul><ul><li>Shiroma, Deanne. (2001). Using Primary Sources on the Internet To Teach and Learn History. Retrieved from ERIC Digest Database. http://www.ericdigests.org/2001-1/history.html </li></ul>BACK TO MENU
  • 12. <ul><li>The three articles that I read taught me that History teachers must be diligent in their research and critical evaluation of primary sources and that they must present these sources to students in a pedagogic manner so that students will learn History with a deeper understanding and personal appreciation. </li></ul>MENU OTTEN SHIROMA DRAKE END

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