Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
ART 213 Midterm Study Slidehow #1
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

ART 213 Midterm Study Slidehow #1

1,261

Published on

Includes What is Art and The Technologies of Art Production.

Includes What is Art and The Technologies of Art Production.

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,261
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
45
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Mid-Term Study Slideshow #1
    ART IN CONTEXT
    ART 213
    10:00AM & 2:00PM MW
    James Greene
  • 2. This Midterm Study Slideshow Covers the Following:
    Unit 1
    What is Art?
    Unit 2
    Technologies of Art Production
  • 3. What is Art?
    THE CENTAUR EXCAVATION AT
    VOLOS- Hodges Library, University of Tennessee, Knoxville TN.
    Professor Beauvais Lyons from the School
    of Art at the University of Tennessee
    Knoxville worked with legendary set designer
    Bob Cothran to install this realistic and
    “scientific” display in the Hodges Library on the
    UTK campus in 1994.
    The centaur challenges students’ pre-conceived notions of the “truths” of Art, Science and History and also distinguishes the role of the University library as descriptive and not prescriptive.
    The Centaur offers an object lesson in skepticism.
    “Do you believe in centaurs?”
  • 4. What is Art?
    Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910)
    Famed author of War and Peace and Anna Karenina, who, later in life, composed several essays on Christianity, morality and art.
    In 1898 his essay What is Art? was published. In it, he argues against numerous aesthetic theories which define art in terms of the good, truth, and especially beauty. In Tolstoy's opinion, art at the time was corrupt and decadent, and artists had been misled.
  • 5. What is Art?
    Leonardo Da Vinci’s Paragone
    In his Paragone, Leo argues persuasively that painting is superior in representing nature than all other forms of expression. The things he emphasizes as important to art have much to do with nature, beautiful light effects, and total control over the virtual “reality” contained within the painted surface.
    His arguments are reiterated by Modern painter, teacher and author Laurie Fendrich, who recommends that students of art read and react to Da Vinci in addition to keeping up with the trends of contemporary art that have taken beauty, nature, and technical skills OUT OF THE ART EQUATION.
  • 6. What is Art?
    John Berger (born 1926) is an English art critic, novelist, painter and author. His 1972 essay on art criticism Ways of Seeing, written as an accompaniment to a BBC series, is often used as a college text. Ways of Seeing examines how seeing paintings or anything else is often less spontaneous or natural than we tend to believe due to the fact that in the age of mechanical reproduction, we see paintings as no one has seen them before.
  • 7. The Technologies of Art Production: DRAWING
    Cave Drawing, Lasceaux, France 15,000-10,000 BC. Pigment, charcoal
    Leonardo Da Vinci, cartoon sketch for Madonna of the Rocks, charcoal, white lead, 1483-1486
  • 8. The Technologies of Art Production: DRAWING
    Kathe Kollwitz, Self-Portrait, Charcoal, 1928
    Adrian Piper, Self-Portrait Exaggerating
    My Negroid Features, pencil drawing, 1981
    Robert Longo, Leap Into The Void, Charcoal drawings, 2004
  • 9. The Technologies of Art Production: PAINTING
    ENCAUSTIC PAINTING: Pigment suspended in heated beeswax
    Egypto-Roman Funerary Masks, encaustic on wood
    Faiyum, c. 160-170 AD.
  • 10. The Technologies of Art Production: PAINTING
    TEMPERA PAINTING:
    Pigment suspended in a mixture of
    water and egg yolk.
    Gentile deFabriano,
    Adoration of the Magi,
    Tempera on wood panel,
    1423.
  • 11. The Technologies of Art Production: PAINTING
    Fresco Painting:
    Pigment suspended in wet, fresh
    plaster applied to walls or ceilings.
    Giotto
    The Lamentation
    Fresco
    c. 1305.
  • 12. The Technologies of Art Production: PAINTING
    OIL PAINTING:
    Pigment suspended in linseed oil
    and thinned with a solvent like turpentine.
    In the high European tradition, oil paint
    is applied in thin transparent glazes that
    build up and create luminous surfaces
    like this one.
    Jaques Louis-David,
    Napoleon Crossing the Alps
    Oil on canvas
    1800.
  • 13. The Technologies of Art Production: PAINTING
    Kehinde Wiley,
    Officer of the Hussars
    Oil on canvas
    2007
    When an artist chooses
    oil paint, they may enter
    into a well-developed
    European tradition of
    representation.
  • 14. The Technologies of Art Production
    Oil paint is uniquely suited to
    capturing the luminosity of
    human flesh.
    Lucian Freud,
    Naked Portrait with Reflection
    Oil on canvas,
    1980
  • 15. The Technologies of Art Production
    Acrylic: Pigment suspended in an
    acrylic polymer (plastic) emulsion
    Robert Shimomura,
    "Classmates"
    acrylic on canvas, 2008
  • 16. The Technologies of Art Production: PAINTING
    James Greene
    Custer, SD
    Acrylic on canvas
    2010
  • 17. Technologies of Art Production: PRINTMAKING
    Prints are derived from a matrix, or a mother image. This can be a block of wood, a metal plate,
    a slab of limestone, a nylon mesh screen or another material. The matrix gets between the work and the artist, but it allows for the creation of multiples.
  • 18. Technologies of Art Production: PRINTMAKING
    Relief Printing:
    An image is carved into a
    surface like a block of wood,
    a linoleum panel, or rubber.
    Whatever surface area is left
    gets inked and pressed into
    paper.
    For each color, a different
    block must be used.
    This woodcut print used
    three blocks.
  • 19. Technologies of Art Production: PRINTMAKING
    INTAGLIO PRINTING
    An image is etched into
    a metal plate and ink is
    scraped into these etched
    grooves. The ink is then
    wiped off the surface.
    When the intaglio is
    pressed, the paper is
    traditionally wet.
    The wet paper grabs the
    Ink out of all the
    grooves in the plate.
    Intaglios have distinct
    embossments.
  • 20. Technologies of Art Production: PRINTMAKING
    LITHOGRAPHY
    Invented on purpose by German
    playwright AloysSenefelder in 1796
    A slab of limestone is drawn upon with
    grease pencil. The image is then
    chemically etched in the stone, allowing
    the printing of multiples.
    This process is still used on a large
    scale using aluminum or polyester
    plates instead of stones.
  • 21. Technologies of Art Production: PRINTMAKING
    LITHOGRAPHY
    Was the most popular form of
    printing in Europe and the US until
    mechanical plate lithography
    replaced it in the early 20th Century.
  • 22. Technologies of Art Production: PRINTMAKING
    SILKSCREEN PRINTING
    The matrix is a piece of nylon
    fabric stretched over a screen
    frame. A stencil is made on the
    mesh, which the ink is pushed
    through to create flat areas of
    color.
    Andy Warhol elevated this cheap
    commercial technique to the level
    of fine art.
  • 23. Technologies of Art Production: PRINTMAKING
    INKJET PRINTING
    The fastest and most ubiquitous commercial method today. Who knows what will replace it?
    It is used by the best selling painter in the US.
    Thomas Kinkade, Make A Wish Cottage, oil on inkjet print on canvas, 2005
  • 24. Technologies of Art Production: PRINTMAKING
    James Greene “Valuistics: The Making Of” (Installation view) silkscreen on pink foam insulation, dimensions vary, 2006.
    PRINTSTALLATION: A new genre where printed multiples are used to redefine a large space.
  • 25. The Technologies of Art Production: PHOTOGRAPHY
    The first European drawing of a CAMERA OBSCURA. 1544
  • 26. The Technologies of Art Production: PHOTOGRAPHY
    18th Century innovations to the camera obscura.
    The Camera Obscura was a drawing instrument that
    used a lens and a dark space to create an upside-down
    image of reality. It would eventually be combined with
    the use of film and mechanized during the industrial revolution to
    become what we think of when we think of a camera.
  • 27. The Technologies of Art Production: PHOTOGRAPHY
    The first permanent photograph was an image produced in 1826 by the French inventor
    NicephoreNiepce. However, because his photographs took so long to expose (8 hours),
    he sought to find a new process.
  • 28. The Technologies of Art Production: PHOTOGRAPHY
    Working in conjunction with Louis Daguerre, they experimented with silver compounds based on a Johann Heinrich Schultz discovery in 1724 that a silver and chalk mixture darkens when exposed to light. Niépce died in 1833, but Daguerre continued the work, eventually culminating with the development of the daguerreotype in 1837. Daguerre took the first ever photo of a person in 1839 when, while taking a daguerreotype of a Paris street, a pedestrian stopped for a shoe shine, long enough to be captured by the long exposure (seven minutes).
  • 29. The Technologies of Art Production: PHOTOGRAPHY
    Matthew Brady, The Dead in Front of Dunker Church, Antietam, Maryland, 1862.
    Many advances in photographic glass plates and printing were made through the nineteenth century.
    Several were made by Matthew Brady’s crew when documenting the American Civil War.
  • 30. The Technologies of Art Production: PHOTOGRAPHY
    In 1884, George Eastman developed the technology
    of cellulose film to replace photographic plates, leading to the
    Eastman-Kodak technology used by film cameras today.
  • 31. Technologies of Art Production: CERAMICS
    PORCELAIN:
    Clay containing high levels of KAOLIN and
    low levels of sand. High plasticity, high fire.
    Porcelain ceramics are among the strongest
    and most luminous.
  • 32. Technologies of Art Production: CERAMICS
    STONEWARE:
    Clay containing less Kaolin than porcelain
    and more sand. Strong, sturdy and not porous. Used in most everyday dishes, mugs, cups, etc. High fire.
  • 33. Technologies of Art Production: CERAMICS
    TERRACOTTA
    Clay containing more sand little kaolin.
    Fired vessels are fragile and porous unless glazed.
    Ancient Greeks used black and red glazes
    for their terracotta dishes and containers.
  • 34. Technologies of Art Production: CERAMICS
    PRIMATIVE
    GAS
    RAKU
    ELECTRIC
    KILN VARIETIES
  • 35. Technologies of Art Production: SCULPTURE
    Relief sculptures are similar to 2D works in that their 3D forms are raised from a flat background.
    In low relief or bas-relief, the forms project only lightly from the background.
  • 36. Technologies of Art Production: SCULPTURE
    In high relief, figures project
    at least half their natural depth.
  • 37. Technologies of Art Production: SCULPTURE
    Freestanding sculptures have fronts, backs sides and tops. They invite the viewer to
    walk around, underneath, or even inside them.
     
  • 38. Technologies of Art Production: SCULPTURE
    Subtractive Process: such as carving,
    unwanted material is removed.
  • 39. Technologies of Art Production: SCULPTURE
    Additive Process:
    such as modeling, casting and
    constructing, material is added,
    assembled, or built up to
    reach its final form.
  • 40. Technologies of Art Production: SCULPTURE
    Casting:
    The Lost-Wax Technique
    is used to create
    BRONZE CASTINGS like this.
  • 41. Technologies of Art Production: SCULPTURE
    Assemblage:Found objects are CONSTUCTED into a finished work.
  • 42. Technologies of Art Production: SCULPTURE
    Earthwork: When the artist uses only the earth as their medium.
    Kinetic sculpture: Where the sculpture literally moves.
  • 43. Technologies of Art Production: SCULPTURE
    PUBLIC COLLABORATIVE SCULPTURE
    When the art is the result of an
    agreement with various
    government bodies.
    The result is a public art experience
    that the entire community shares.
  • 44. Technologies of Art Production: NEW MEDIA
    SOUND ART: Speaks for itself. Sound pieces need
    not have an accompanying visual element.
    VIDEO ART: An artist or artists produce(s) a work that
    exists primarily as a video. A watershed moment for artists
    came in 1967 with the invention of the Sony Port-A-Pack.
  • 45. Technologies of Art Production: NEW MEDIA
    Performance: Performance art can be any situation that involves four basic elements: time, space, the performer's body and a relationship between performer and audience. A piece of performance art may or may not have similarities with theatre. Performances are often documented with video and audio, blurring the boundaries between sound art, video art and performance art. This is why the term NEW MEDIA is useless.
  • 46. Technologies of Art Production: NEW MEDIA
    Virtual Reality: Using a combination of video and sound, or a digital video-game interface, artists create
    virtual situations that take over the viewer’s senses. This can be delivered via a computer screen or created
    within a space that responds to the viewer’s presence using motion-sensing devises.
  • 47. Technologies of Art Production: NEW MEDIA
    Installation Art: This blanket termdescribes an artistic genre of site-specific, three- dimensional works designed to transform the perception of a space. The genre incorporates a very broad range of everyday and natural materials, which are often chosen for their evocative qualities. Many installations are site-specific in that they are designed to only exist in the space for which they were created.
  • 48. Technologies of Art Production: NEW MEDIA
    CaiGuoQiang: Head On
    99 stuffed wolves, plexiglass, monofilamentDeutsche Guggenheim, Berlin, Germany 2006
  • 49. Technologies of Art Production: NEW MEDIA
    Christopher Baker: Hello, World! Or, How I Learned to Stop Listening and Love the Noise
    Video, sound, motion sensors and rear-projection screens, 2008.

×