Discounted Cash Flow Valuation
Net Income versus Cash Flows from Operating Activities
4.1 The One-Period Case: Future Value <ul><li>In the one-period case, the formula for  FV  can be written as: </li></ul><u...
4.1 The One-Period Case:  Present Value <ul><li>In the one-period case, the formula for  PV  can be written as: </li></ul>...
4.1 The One-Period Case:  Net Present Value <ul><li>The  Net Present Value  ( NPV ) of an investment is the  present value...
4.1 The One-Period Case: Net Present Value <ul><li>In the one-period case, the formula for  NPV  can be written as: </li><...
4.2 The Multiperiod Case: Future Value <ul><li>The general formula for the future value of an investment over many periods...
Present Value and Compounding <ul><li>How much would an investor have to set aside today in order to have $20,000 five yea...
4.3 Compounding Periods <ul><li>Compounding an investment  m  times a year for  T  years provides for future value of weal...
4.4 Simplifications <ul><li>Perpetuity </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A  constant  stream of cash flows that lasts forever. </li></...
Perpetuity <ul><li>A constant stream of cash flows that lasts forever </li></ul>… 0 1 C 2 C 3 C
Growing Perpetuity <ul><li>A growing stream of cash flows that lasts forever </li></ul>… 0 1 C 2 C ×(1+ g ) 3 C  ×(1+ g ) 2
Growing Perpetuity: Example <ul><li>The expected dividend next year is $1.30, and dividends are expected to grow at 5% for...
Annuity <ul><li>A constant stream of cash flows with a fixed maturity </li></ul>0 1 C 2 C 3 C T C
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Chap004

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  • Chap004

    1. 1. Discounted Cash Flow Valuation
    2. 2. Net Income versus Cash Flows from Operating Activities
    3. 3. 4.1 The One-Period Case: Future Value <ul><li>In the one-period case, the formula for FV can be written as: </li></ul><ul><li>FV = C 0 ×(1 + r ) T </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Where C 0 is cash flow today (time zero) and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>r is the appropriate interest rate. </li></ul></ul>
    4. 4. 4.1 The One-Period Case: Present Value <ul><li>In the one-period case, the formula for PV can be written as: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Where C 1 is cash flow at date 1 and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>r is the appropriate interest rate. </li></ul></ul>
    5. 5. 4.1 The One-Period Case: Net Present Value <ul><li>The Net Present Value ( NPV ) of an investment is the present value of the expected cash flows , less the cost of the investment . </li></ul><ul><li>Suppose an investment that promises to pay $10,000 in one year is offered for sale for $9,500. Your interest rate is 5%. Should you buy? </li></ul>Yes!
    6. 6. 4.1 The One-Period Case: Net Present Value <ul><li>In the one-period case, the formula for NPV can be written as: </li></ul><ul><li>NPV = – Cost + PV </li></ul>
    7. 7. 4.2 The Multiperiod Case: Future Value <ul><li>The general formula for the future value of an investment over many periods can be written as: </li></ul><ul><li>FV = C 0 ×(1 + r ) T </li></ul><ul><li>Where </li></ul><ul><li> C 0 is cash flow at date 0, </li></ul><ul><ul><li>r is the appropriate interest rate, and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>T is the number of periods over which the cash is invested. </li></ul></ul>
    8. 8. Present Value and Compounding <ul><li>How much would an investor have to set aside today in order to have $20,000 five years from now if the current rate is 15%? </li></ul>$20,000 PV 0 1 2 3 4 5
    9. 9. 4.3 Compounding Periods <ul><li>Compounding an investment m times a year for T years provides for future value of wealth: </li></ul>For example, if you invest $50 for 3 years at 12% compounded semi-annually, your investment will grow to
    10. 10. 4.4 Simplifications <ul><li>Perpetuity </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A constant stream of cash flows that lasts forever. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Growing perpetuity </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A stream of cash flows that grows at a constant rate forever. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Annuity </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A stream of constant cash flows that lasts for a fixed number of periods. </li></ul></ul>
    11. 11. Perpetuity <ul><li>A constant stream of cash flows that lasts forever </li></ul>… 0 1 C 2 C 3 C
    12. 12. Growing Perpetuity <ul><li>A growing stream of cash flows that lasts forever </li></ul>… 0 1 C 2 C ×(1+ g ) 3 C ×(1+ g ) 2
    13. 13. Growing Perpetuity: Example <ul><li>The expected dividend next year is $1.30, and dividends are expected to grow at 5% forever. </li></ul><ul><li>If the discount rate is 10%, what is the value of this promised dividend stream? </li></ul>… 0 1 $1.30 2 $1.30 ×(1.05) 3 $1.30 ×(1.05) 2
    14. 14. Annuity <ul><li>A constant stream of cash flows with a fixed maturity </li></ul>0 1 C 2 C 3 C T C
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