TACKLING THE ICE PROBLEM AMONGST YOUTH By Dan Pankraz
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TACKLING THE ICE PROBLEM AMONGST YOUTH By Dan Pankraz

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This presentation puts forward a potential communications solution to tackle the growing ICE (crystal meth) epidemic grappling Australian youth. This strategy focuses on avoiding traditional scare ...

This presentation puts forward a potential communications solution to tackle the growing ICE (crystal meth) epidemic grappling Australian youth. This strategy focuses on avoiding traditional scare tactics and changing the conversation with Australian youth in regards to drug education. It was a finalist in the APG Planning competition.

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TACKLING THE ICE PROBLEM AMONGST YOUTH By Dan Pankraz Presentation Transcript

  • 1. TACKLING THE YOUTH ‘ICE’ EPIDEMIC IN AUSTRALIA DAN PANKRAZ
  • 2. THIS DECK IS A POTENTIAL COMMUNICATIONS SOLUTION TO TACKLE THE ‘ICE’ EPIDEMIC PROBLEM GRIPPING AUSTRALIAN YOUTH… THE FULL PAPER WAS A FINALIST IN THE APG PLANNING COMPETITION AND IS IN THE APPENDIX
  • 3. WHAT ARE THE FOUR THINGS YOUNG PEOPLE WILL ALWAYS DO?
  • 4. DRINK TOO MUCH
  • 5. DRIVE TOO FAST DRIVE TOO FAST
  • 6. HAVE SEX A moment courtesy of Leo DiCaprio
  • 7. AND TRY DRUGS….
  • 8. THEY ARE CHEMICALLY HARD WIRED FOR RISKY BEHAVIOUR
    • “ 60% of risk taking behaviour is genetically pre – determined”
    • Dr Marvin Zuckerman, University of Delaware on ‘Sensation Seeking Behaviour”
  • 9. COMMUNICATIONS MUST FOCUS ON THE ‘DABBLERS’ NOT ON ADDICTS
    • “ I’m in complete control of my Ice use…I’ll never get like one of those ‘skater junkies’
    • Casual User
  • 10. HOW DO YOU TALK TO PEOPLE WHO THINK THEY’RE INVINCIBLE?
  • 11. “ The only thing that will stop me taking ICE, is death” Ice addict NO COMMUNICATION WILL HELP HARCORE ADDICTS
  • 12. SO THIS STRATEGY IS ALL ABOUT
    • HARM MINIMISATION
    • NOT
    • PREVENTION
  • 13. WHAT WOULD YOU PREFER IN THEIR HANDS? vs MACHINE GUN BB GUN IF THEY ARE GOING TO DO DRUGS, LETS MAKE SURE IT’S ANYTHING BUT ICE.
  • 14. SCARE TACTICS DON’T WORK SCARE TACTICS DON’T WORK WITH YOUTH
  • 15. THE GOVERNMENT SAYS ALL DRUGS WILL KILL YOU IT’S BULLSHIT 200,000 ECSTASY PILLS POPPED EVERY WEEKEND IN AUST., MAX 3 PEOPLE DIE A YEAR
  • 16. THEY’VE COMPLETELY LOST CREDIBILITY AS THEY’VE TRIED TO SCARE YOUTH FOR DECADES AND IT HASN’T WORKED
  • 17. ALL DRUGS ARE NOT CREATED EQUAL, SOME ARE FAR WORSE THAN OTHERS..BUT YOUTH DON’T KNOW WHICH ONES ARE
  • 18. ICE DESTROYS YOU PHYSICALLY Source: methmadness.com
  • 19. AND MENTALLY 3 YEARS OF REGULAR USE
  • 20. BUT IT’S THE MOST EUPHORIC “ It’s the most amazing feeling ever, you just can’t beat it…I feel like I’m in the clouds’ Casual User
  • 21. SO THE JOB IS TO REPOSITION ICE DEATH LIMITED HARM SOCIALLY UNACCEPTABLE SOCIALLY ACCEPTABLE Ecstasy Cannabis Heroin ICE Cocaine Crack GBH MDMA Acid/ LSD Alcohol HARDCORE/ADDICTS RECREATIONAL DRUGS ICE CURRENT PERCEPTION FUTURE PERCEPTION
  • 22. AND CHANGE THE CONVERSATION WITH YOUTH
  • 23. 1. STOP TALKING DOWN TO THEM HAVE AN ADULT TO ADULT DIALOGUE
  • 24. 2. TELL THE TRUTH..BE HONEST SHOW THEM THE POSITIVE AND NEGATIVE… YES, SHOW THEM THE POSITIVE SIDE OF ICE AS WELL
  • 25. 3. DON’T BE AFRAID OF TOUGH LOVE
  • 26. 4. MAKE ICE A ‘LIFE DECISION’ NOT A RECREATIONAL DECISION EMPOWER THEM TO TAKE RESPONSIBILITY
  • 27. THE INSIGHT
    • “ Trying to scare me won’t work, let me make up my own mind by giving me a realistic view.”
  • 28.  
  • 29. Action Against ICE Group CREATING A PEER BASED POLITICAL PARTY
  • 30. STRATEGY ON A PAGE HONESTY
  • 31.
    • APPENDIX
    • Full paper and exec summary
  • 32. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
    • The task of any ICE communication shouldn’t be about ‘abstinence’ – it has been proven to be ineffective against highly addictive substances. . If people want to try ICE, they will. The real job is ‘harm minimisation’, basically getting those who are ‘dabbling’ in it to get out before the addiction takes hold. No communication strategy will help addicts.
    • The problem with anti-drug messaging is that it rarely paints a truthful picture of the casual user experience. Forget scare tactics, talking down to them or showing life as an addict. They’ve seen it all before and it’s not credible.
    •  
    • Of course ICE has destructive physical and mental consequences, but it also delivers the most euphoric feeling one can have. Hence, a balanced perspective on ICE is required so casual users can make their own mind up about which path they want to take.
    •  
    • This strategy is based on changing the conversation - creating a new dialogue around choice, empowering and challenging them to make fully informed life decisions.
    •  
    • Core idea: “ICE: YOUR CHOICE, YOUR LIFE”
    •  
    • Taking ICE is a life choice, a decision to end your life prematurely. If you make that choice, you’re on your own and must live (or die) with the consequences.
    •  
    • Rather than use traditional TV ads which have limited impact, we’re going to create a political party called ‘ACTION AGAINST ICE’ who campaign to have ICE communication funds redirected to national health issues where people don’t have a choice eg: breast cancer.
  • 33. ‘ ICE: YOUR CHOICE, YOUR LIFE’
    • Have you ever experienced ICE?
    •  
    • I have, and it’s absolutely amazing. An exhilarating rush engulfs your entire body, you feel completely euphoric and life feels great. Time stands still almost. That’s why I’m convinced that only talking about the negative effects won’t work.
    •  
    • A redefinition of the task is required
    •  
    • The task of any ICE communication shouldn’t be about ‘abstinence’ – it has been proven time and again to be ineffective against highly addictive substances. If people want to try it – they will. The real job is ‘harm minimisation’, basically getting those who are dabbling in it to get out before the addiction takes hold.
    •  
    • The Issue
    •  
    • Since its arrival in the late 90’s from Thailand, ICE has quietly infiltrated the Australian drug scene and spread like a virus. There are now 73,000 ICE addicts, five times the number of heroin addicts. Around 500,000 Australians have tried ICE, and it’s the No.1 target in the Federal Governments $40m war against drugs.
    •  
    • Why they love it
    •  
    • ICE has become the drug of choice for Gen Y – it’s convenient, relatively cheap ($450 a gram lasts 3 weeks), accessible, can be smoked, and doesn’t (yet) have the stigma of heroin. It hits faster and harder than any other drug, triggering the release of huge amounts of dopamine – the feel good chemical the brain releases naturally, hence the euphoric feeling and addictive quality. The more you take it, the more you need it. Three casual users spoke about how they feel more socially acceptable and desirable and how it helps counter the stress of busy professional life.
    • “ Experience, research shows testing doesn’t work” Marsha Rosenbaum http://www.drugpolicy.org/library/dtfrosenmaum.cfm
    • National Alcohol Research Centre
    • www.mja.com ‘Ice: cool drug or real problem” Gordian WO Fulde and Alex Wodak
    • Ice top priority in war against drugs. http://www.news.com.au/story/0,23599,20623767-2,00.html
    • Professor Iain McGregor, Sydney University Professor of Psychology ABC Four Corners ICE AGE documentary 20/3/2006
    • In depth interview with three ICE users in Surry Hills, Oct 4,2007
  • 34.
    • How nasty it really is
    •  
    • Picture this, a high lasting days where you can’t sleep or eat, paranoia that suspends reality, a chattering jaw that rots your teeth (meth mouth), scratching your skin off because you think you have ICE bugs under your skin, and a come down that literally wipes you out for days. Now picture someone in a psychosis, violently out of control to the point where it takes over five emergency ward staff to subdue them.These are just the short term effects, the long term effects are relatively unknown. There are currently no dedicated treatment programs in Australia.
    •  
    •  
    • The Target: Dabblers not Skaters
    •  
    • Asking a skater (addict) what would make them stop reveals a scary response:
    • “ Death is the only thing that would make me stop taking ICE..it’s that good”
    •  
    • These skaters are hooked and no amount of advertising will change their behaviour. Medical intervention is the only solution.
    •  
    • The strategy needs to focus on under 35yr old ‘dabblers’ - the casual ICE users who take the drug 2-3 times a month and are not yet addicted. They are at most risk of falling into a potentially deadly habit, their mindset can be defined in two words, ‘I’m invincible’. They think they’re bullet proof, able to dip in an out of the habit with minimal risk, avoiding addiction and the nasty side effects.
    •  
    • ABC Four Corners ‘The Ice Age’ report by Matthew Carney
    • Source: One on One interview with ICE addict Oct 14, 2007 Surry Hills
    •  
  • 35.
    • How do you deal with the ‘invincible’?
    •  
    • A ‘ don’t do this it’s bad for you’ fear approach will not work as they’ve become immune to scare tactics. They’ve grown up seeing ads for drink driving, anti-smoking; all talking down to them about the harmful effects of that behaviour to their health. The Australian Governments latest Ecstasy scare ad is featured below.
    •  
    •  
    • In the case of anti-drug messaging, the current communication model is an ‘adult to kid’ approach, treating them as kids and only dramatising the negative mental and physical effects associated with hardcore use. They’re simply not believable or credible and don’t portray a balanced view of their own experience with the drug eg: the negative consequences are not balanced with the positive feelings. They just don’t believe they’ll end up like the junkies portrayed in most ads.
    •  
    • As part of exploratory research, three casual ICE users were shown youtube footage depicting the horrific short terms physical effects of ICE usage. Their response:
    •  
    • “ That won’t happen to me, I’m in complete control of my ICE usage…that only happens to addicts that can’t control it”
    • www.youtube.com
    • Source: Interview with casual Ice user: Darren Oct 11,2007
  • 36.
    • So what could potentially work?
    •  
    • Four alternate communication approaches were presented to dabblers for their perspectives.
    •  
    • Potential Strategies
    • ICE User Response
    • 1. Dramatise the bad stuff in it eg: dirty ICE
    • “ I know the ICE I buy is pure, only ICE that’s been ‘jumped’ has those nasty side effects”
    • 2. Dramatise the Physical effects (Ekboms syndrome, teeth falling out, quick ageing)
    • “ You’ve got to be using ICE everyday to have those side effects…only hardcore junkies get that”
    • 3. Dramatise the Mental effects (paranoia, insomnia, repetitive behaviour, violent behaviour)
    • “ I’ll never get like that, I’m in complete control”
    • 4 Effect on others (family, friends)
    • “ I’m not thinking about anyone else when I’m skating..I’m just enjoying the feeling”
    •  
    • It’s clear that only talking about the negatives and being didactic will not work, they want a balanced view that has credibility.
    •  
    • Interview with three causal ICE users in Surry Hills Oct 14,2007
  • 37.
    • The Key Insight
    •  
    • “ Trying to scare me won’t work, let me make up my own mind by giving me a realistic view.”
    •  
    • The Communications Challenge to change their mindset therefore becomes a question which acknowledges their real life experience of ICE:
    • ICE makes you feel amazing, but is it worth it?
    •  
    • The ‘Choice’ Communication Model
    •  
    • A ‘choice’ communication model must be created where an adult to adult dialogue is generated and dabblers aren’t spoken down to.
    •  
    • Core Strategic Idea:
    •  
    • “ ICE: YOUR CHOICE, YOUR LIFE”
    •  
    • Purposefully confrontational and provocative, it’s about talking to them about the potentially fatal choice they’re making if they use ICE. It has to be clear that if they go down the ICE path they’re on their own and have to live (or die) with the consequences…with choice, comes responsibility.
    •  
    • Think of it as a form of social isolation, if they don’t value their own lives and keep using ICE, then why should society help them when there are so many other health issues in Australia requiring attention?
    •  
    • This strategy isn’t about telling them what to do; it’s about a real perspective on ICE and challenging them to take responsibility for their own actions. To achieve credibility and believability, this message must come from people personally affected by the ICE epidemic.
  • 38.
    • Bringing this idea to life.
    •  
    • Rather than spend tax payer money on traditional advertising, a political party called ACTION AGAINST ICE (AAI) would be created.
    •  
    • AAI would campaign against ICE use and lobby to have all government funding for ICE communications redirected to health issues where people don’t have a choice eg: breast cancer, lymphoma.
    •  
    • The AAI party would be comprised of individuals affected by ICE use ( eg: hospital emergency staff, cops, social workers, families of addicts, current addicts seeking help ). AAI would lead conversations on social networking sites/ blogs/ forums, organise rallies, and seek representation in the senate.
    •  
    • A massive PR push to create public discussion and broader societal involvement would be developed, sending a message to dabblers that if they use ICE they are on their own. Non ICE users would equally want to get involved in AAI, showing their disdain of ICE abuse.
    •  
    • AAI party members at the coalface of the problem would be charged with capturing real unedited video footage depicting the pro’s and con’s of ICE and the slippery slope that accompanies playing with this drug. This content would be posted on actionagainstice.com.au, on their Facebook pages, on youtube and other social networking sites, serving as our education vehicle. Its objective will be to showcase an authentic perspective of the ICE life as opposed to the current strategy of print or TV ads which only show junkies.
  • 39.
    • Care for a ‘Bodybag’?
    •  
    • It’s critical to connect with them while they’re thinking about or preparing to purchase ICE. One tactic could be confronting them with hard hitting activities dramatising the potentially fatal consequences of ICE at point of use/purchase.
    •  
    • ICE usage spikes during the summer ‘party period’ so empty ‘body bags’ could be strategically left outside clubs, trendy bars, music festivals, with the message
    • ‘ ICE : YOUR CHOICE, YOUR LIFE’ emblazoned on the body bag.
    •  
    • Will it work?
    •  
    • Effectiveness of the idea would be measured on numerous fronts.
    • Most importantly, hard measures such as:
    • A reduction in the number of dabblers who describe themselves as regular ICE users
    • A reduction in ICE related admissions to emergency wards.
    • An increase in the price of ICE as demand becomes subdued
    •  
    • Soft measures would also be measured:
    • Number of AAI party members and level of activity
    • Amount of money generated by the party to redistribute to other health issues
    • Increase in numbers of people seeking involvement in AAI
    • Measurement of blog chatter on social networking sites, forums and aai.com.
    • Amount of PR coverage for AAI and body bag stunts
    • Number of Facebook members
    • # of times content is downloaded from AAI site
    •  
    • To address the ICE problem a new conversation is required. Forget scare tactics, preaching or showing life as an addict. The solution is talking to them as adults, giving them a choice. Taking ICE is a life decision, a decision to end your life prematurely. Tough love is required, if they choose the ICE path, they’re on their own.
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •