Laughter is The Best Medicine
Different Types of Laughter   <ul><li>there are many different types of laughter: The first includes spontaneous laughter....
It's been said that laughter is the best medicine, but no one has yet to prove it.   <ul><li>Now a Japanese scientist is u...
Geneticist Kazuo Murakami has teamed up on the study with an unlikely research partner: stand-up comedians, who he hopes c...
Papousek’s finding: <ul><li>The feeling of happiness caused by the laughing, the distraction and improvements to the perso...
True Laughter is Nothing But Heartfelt Prayer <ul><li>In a recent editorial in the Times Of India, Sri Sri Ravi Shankar sa...
Humor Can Increase Hope, Research Shows <ul><li>Laughter might be the best medicine for transforming the faintest of glimm...
Why We Laugh   <ul><li>According to  R. Morgan Griffin , laughter was a simpler method of communication. &quot;In fact, pe...
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Laughter Is The Best Medicine

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Laughter Is The Best Medicine

  1. 1. Laughter is The Best Medicine
  2. 2. Different Types of Laughter <ul><li>there are many different types of laughter: The first includes spontaneous laughter. The other group includes laughter that is less spontaneous: it includes fake laughter, nervous laughter, and other social laughter that is unconnected to humor. </li></ul><ul><li>The spontaneous laughter originates in part from the brainstem, an ancient part of the brain. So it might be a more original form of laughter. The other type of laughter comes from parts of the brain that developed more recently, in evolutionary terms. </li></ul>
  3. 3. It's been said that laughter is the best medicine, but no one has yet to prove it. <ul><li>Now a Japanese scientist is unlocking the secrets of the funny bone, which he believes can cheer up people's genes </li></ul>a good laugh is enough to increase the level of feel-good hormones in your blood, a conference has heard. Previous work has shown that laughter triggers a cascade of beneficial physiological changes
  4. 4. Geneticist Kazuo Murakami has teamed up on the study with an unlikely research partner: stand-up comedians, who he hopes can turn their one-liners into efficient, low-cost medical treatment <ul><li>His theory: laughter is one such stimulant, which can trigger energy inside a person's DNA potentially helping cure disease. </li></ul><ul><li>laughter therapy helped people recovering from strokes lower their blood pressure. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Papousek’s finding: <ul><li>The feeling of happiness caused by the laughing, the distraction and improvements to the person's mood in the long run can help improve the quality of life for patients as well as healthy individuals.&quot; </li></ul>Laughter as prayer?
  6. 6. True Laughter is Nothing But Heartfelt Prayer <ul><li>In a recent editorial in the Times Of India, Sri Sri Ravi Shankar said, &quot;Laughter comes from the cente of our Being, from the core of our heart. Our belly is so full of laughter that the laughter permeates every cell in our body. True laughter is true prayer. When you laugh, the whole of nature laughs with you. It echoes and resounds and makes life worthwhile. When tings go all right, everybody can laugh, but when everything falls apart, and yet you laugh, that is evolution and growth. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Humor Can Increase Hope, Research Shows <ul><li>Laughter might be the best medicine for transforming the faintest of glimmers of hope into an eternal spring </li></ul><ul><li>Research at Texas A&M University that shows humor may significantly increase a person's level of hope. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Why We Laugh <ul><li>According to R. Morgan Griffin , laughter was a simpler method of communication. &quot;In fact, people who are born blind and deaf still laugh. So we know it's not a learned behavior. Humans are hardwired for laughter.&quot; </li></ul><ul><li>But perhaps because laughter is so ancient, it's much less precise than language. &quot;Laughter isn't under our conscious control,&quot; says Provine. &quot;We don't choose to laugh in the same way that we choose to speak.&quot; If you've ever had an inopportune laughing fit -- in a lecture, during a high school play, or at a funeral, for instance -- you know that laughter can't always be tamed. </li></ul>
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