The South Ossetia War
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The South Ossetia War

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The South Ossetia War Presentation Transcript

  • 1. The South Ossetia War The Georgia-Russia conflict By: Mike Melchiorre Kenny Piccari
  • 2. Background
    • THE SEPARATIST ADMINISTRATIONS IN SOUTH OSSETIA AND ABKHAZIA HAVE BEEN TRYING TO GAIN FORMAL INDEPENDENCE SINCE BREAKING AWAY IN THE EARLY 1990S. RUSSIA HAS NOW RECOGNISED THEM AS INDEPENDENT - A MOVE CONDEMNED BY WESTERN NATIONS.
  • 3. Causes of the war
    • A SERIES OF CLASHES BETWEEN GEORGIAN AND SOUTH OSSETIAN FORCES IN THE SUMMER OF 2008 PROMPTED GEORGIA TO LAUNCH AN AERIAL BOMBARDMENT AND GROUND ATTACK ON SOUTH OSSETIA ON 7 AUGUST.
    • GEORGIAN FORCES CONTROLLED THE SOUTH OSSETIAN CAPITAL, TSKHINVALI, FOR PART OF THE FOLLOWING DAY.
    • RUSSIA, MEANWHILE, POURED THOUSANDS OF TROOPS INTO SOUTH OSSETIA, AND LAUNCHED BOMBING RAIDS BOTH OVER THE PROVINCE AND ON TARGETS IN THE REST OF GEORGIA.
    • THERE HAVE BEEN UNVERIFIED REPORTS OF WAR CRIMES ON BOTH SIDES.
  • 4. Countries involved in the war
    • GEORGIAN, RUSSIAN AND SOUTH OSSETIAN FORCES WERE ALL INVOLVED. THERE WERE ALSO CLASHES IN ABKHAZIA, AND RUSSIAN ATTACKS ON OTHER PARTS OF GEORGIA.
  • 5. Strength of Forces
    • The exact numbers are unknown however there are estimates
    • Georgia- 9,000 – 16,000
    • Russia- up to 22,000
    • South Ossetia- 3,000 regulars, 15,000 reservists
    • Abkhazia- potential of 45,000
  • 6. Major Events of the War
    • August 7- Georgian armor begins attacking south Ossetian lines
    • August 8- The Battle of Tskhinvali- Georgia captured several South Ossetia cities
    • August 9- Abkhazian Front- Naval skirmish between Georgia and Russia
  • 7. Major Events of the War
    • August 14- Occupation of Poti- Russia moved into Poti and sunk several Georgian naval vessels
  • 8. Six Point Peace Plan
    • This was used to help end the war, all countries signed it
    • No recourse to the use of force.
    • Definitive cessation of hostilities.
    • Free access to humanitarian aid ( addition rejected: and to allow the return of refugees).
    • The Armed Forces of Georgia must withdraw to their permanent positions.
    • The Armed Forces of the Russian Federation must withdraw to the line where they were stationed prior to the beginning of hostilities. Prior to the establishment of international mechanisms the Russian peacekeeping forces will take additional security measures. ( addition rejected: six months)
    • An international debate on the future status of South Ossetia and Abkhazia and ways to ensure their lasting security will take place. ( addition rejected: based on the decisions of the UN and the OSCE).
  • 9. Result
    • The Russians, South Ossetians, and the Abkhazians held the victory
    • South Ossetia and Abkhazia received partial recognition of being independent countries
    • Most ethnic Georgians were expelled from South Ossetia and from the Kodori Gorge
  • 10. Casualties
    • Georgia- 183 soldiers abd policemen killed, 39 missing, 42 captured
    • Russia- 64 killed, 283 missing, 3 captured
    • South Ossetia- 150 killed, 41captured
    • Abkhazia- 1 killed, 2 wounded
  • 11. Images of the war
  • 12. Images of the war
  • 13. Images of the war
  • 14. Images of the war
  • 15. Images of the war
  • 16. THE END
    • Thanks to
    • Kenny Piccari
    • Mike Melchiorre
    • Google images
    • CNN.com