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Momentum And Impulse
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Momentum And Impulse

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  • 1. Linear Momentum and Impulse By: Qusay Alfaori Supervisor: Marc Reif
  • 2. Collisions
    • A collision is a short-duration interaction between two objects. For example, the collision between a baseball and a bat.
    • It may seem instantaneous to our eyes, but look at the picture and see.
    • We can tell that there is an
    • interaction between the bat
    • and the baseball.
  • 3. What is linear Momentum
    • The example of the baseball and the bat can make us think about the objects and their velocities when they collide.
    • The linear momentum of a particle or an object can be modeled as a particle of mass ( m) moving with a velocity (v) is defined to be the product of the mass and velocity:
  • 4. The relationship between Force and Linear Momentum
    • If we follow this mathematical steps, we will come up with the relationship.
    • We can conclude that the time rate of change of the linear momentum of a particle is equal to the net force acting on the particle.
  • 5. What is Impulse
    • The impulse is the force F acting on a particle equals the change in the momentum of the particle.
    • or we can
    • integrate to get the change in momentum.
  • 6. Conservation of Momentum
    • Two types of collisions: Elastic and Inelastic.
    • Elastic collision: the total kinetic energy (as well as the total momentum) of the system is the same before and after the collision.
    • Inelastic collision: the total kinetic energy is not the same before and after the collision ( even though the momentum of the system is conserved).
    • Two types of inelastic collision: stick together after collision, and do not stick together after collision but some energy is lost.
  • 7. Conservation of Momentum
    • Momentum of the system is conserved in all collisions, but Kinetic energy of the system is conserved only in elastic collisions.
  • 8. Conservation of Momentum
    • Perfectly Inelastic Collisions:
    • before collision
    • after collision
    • so we can say that momentum is conserved
  • 9. Conservation of momentum
    • So we can find the final velocity by doing this
  • 10. Conservation of Momentum
    • Elastic Collisions:
    • before collision
    • after collision
    • we can say that momentum is conserved
  • 11. Conservation of Momentum
    • So each ball will have different velocity after collision and can be calculated this way
  • 12. Sources
    • Physics by Randall D. Knight
    • www.google.com/images

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