By Mike Lendy
<ul><li>When cowboy Roy is given a saddle for his birthday, he can’t wait to try it out. Right after he figures out what i...
<ul><li>Activity- </li></ul><ul><li>1.) Have students compare and contrast the different animals shown in the book.  </li>...
<ul><li>From School Library Journal </li></ul><ul><li>Starred Review. PreSchool-Grade 3—This story starts on the cover wit...
<ul><li>Activity- </li></ul><ul><li>1.) After reading the book, we will discuss why we think the lion chose to free the mo...
<ul><li>From School Library Journal </li></ul><ul><li>Kindergarten-Grade 2—Henrietta the chicken, star of  Souperchicken  ...
<ul><li>Activity- </li></ul><ul><li>1.)Introduce “Plot” and “Main Character” to students. </li></ul><ul><li>2.)Have studen...
<ul><li>PreSchool-Grade 2–In spare, rhyming text, a boy and his father, a builder, explore the site of the child's new sch...
<ul><li>Activity- </li></ul><ul><li>1.) Have students break up into small groups. Give each group a box of Leggos.  </li><...
<ul><li>From School Library Journal </li></ul><ul><li>Grade 1-4–The boys from the  The Dangerous Snake and Reptile Club  (...
<ul><li>Activity- </li></ul><ul><li>1.) Bring in a number of different rocks. Tell students to pretend they are meteorites...
<ul><li>From School Library Journal </li></ul><ul><li>Grade 2-5-A Gullah story brought into beautiful focus by Pinkney's t...
<ul><li>Activity-  </li></ul><ul><li>1.) Explain more about the history of drums and how they were used in previous cultur...
<ul><li>Pilkey (When Cats Dream; the Dragon books) is at his best in this highly atmospheric work. Here his trademark colo...
<ul><li>Activity </li></ul><ul><li>1.) Have students do a “self-reflection” journal write. Would you want to do this boys ...
<ul><li>This picture book admirably conveys the miracle of a seed. Flower pods burst and dispatch their seeds on the wind;...
<ul><li>Activity-  </li></ul><ul><li>1.) Have stations set out in order for students to plant their own plants. Students s...
<ul><li>Product Description </li></ul><ul><li>Follow the adventures of Bryan Bronson and his friends Rudy and Olivia as th...
<ul><li>Activity-  </li></ul><ul><li>1.) Introduce a thermometer to students and the various parts on it.  </li></ul><ul><...
<ul><li>In a rollicking, tongue-in-cheek entree to the entomological world, Damselfly Dilly uncovers a plot by a group of ...
<ul><li>Activity- </li></ul><ul><li>1.) Students will learn about characteristics of bugs and will classify them into grou...
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    1. 1. By Mike Lendy
    2. 2. <ul><li>When cowboy Roy is given a saddle for his birthday, he can’t wait to try it out. Right after he figures out what it’s for. Luckily, it comes with instructions (“1. Find a horse. 2. Enjoy the ride”), but unluckily, Roy doesn’t know what a horse is. So he saunters about asking each creature he meets if it’s a horse. They all tell him why they’re not: horses have legs, explains the snake; a horse is friendly, explains the many-legged crab; a horse can’t change colors, says the friendly chameleon. Roy is just about out of questions when he finally finds something that fits all the requirements, and a horse it turns out to be. The western-styled gouache art is packed with colors and peppered with lighthearted jokes. Much of the visual fun comes from the way each animal has the characteristic Roy has just learned about from the previous encounter, while the text effectively uses negation to keep him looking. Kids will enjoy knowing more than the hapless Roy with the final page showing an extremely unexpected horsy ride. Preschool-Grade 2. --Ian Chipman </li></ul>
    3. 3. <ul><li>Activity- </li></ul><ul><li>1.) Have students compare and contrast the different animals shown in the book. </li></ul><ul><li>2.) What type of animals do they really live in? </li></ul><ul><li>3.) Have each student pick an animal from the story. </li></ul><ul><li>4.) Allow them to mimic a noise or action that animal makes and see if the students can guess it. </li></ul><ul><li>Standards- Science 2.6 Common Themes- Students begin to observe how objects are alike and similar. </li></ul><ul><li>Gardner- Bodily/Kinesthetic, Linguistc </li></ul>
    4. 4. <ul><li>From School Library Journal </li></ul><ul><li>Starred Review. PreSchool-Grade 3—This story starts on the cover with the glorious, golden countenance of a lion. No text is necessary to communicate the title: the direction of the beast's gaze and the conflicted expression on his tightly cropped face compel readers to turn the book over, where a mouse, almost filling the vertical space, glances back. The endpapers and artist's note place these creatures among the animal families of the African Serengeti. Each spread contributes something new in this nearly wordless narrative, including the title opening, on which the watchful rodent pauses, resting in one of the large footprints that marches across the gutter. In some scenes, Pinkney's luminous art, rendered in watercolor and colored pencil, suggests a natural harmony, as when the cool blues of the sky are mirrored in the rocks and acacia tree. In other compositions, a cream-colored background focuses attention on the exquisitely detailed and nuanced forms of the two main characters. Varied perspectives and the judicious use of panels create interest and indicate time. Sounds are used sparingly and purposefully—an owl's hoot to hint at offstage danger or an anguished roar to alert the mouse of the lion's entrapment. Contrast this version with Pinkney's traditional treatment of the same story (complete with moral) in Aesop's Fables (North-South, 2000). The ambiguity that results from the lack of words in this version allows for a slower, subtle, and ultimately more satisfying read. Moments of humor and affection complement the drama. A classic tale from a consummate artist.— Wendy Lukehart, Washington DC Public Library END --This text refers to an alternate Hardcover edition. </li></ul>
    5. 5. <ul><li>Activity- </li></ul><ul><li>1.) After reading the book, we will discuss why we think the lion chose to free the mouse. How did that end up coming back to help him? </li></ul><ul><li>2.) Have students pick roles from the story (one could be the lion, the mouse, etc..) </li></ul><ul><li>3.) Have them act out the story while reading. </li></ul><ul><li>4.) Think critically about how nature would change if all mice and lion got along. How might that alter the food chain or ecosystem? </li></ul><ul><li>5.)Pair up in small groups and have each group come up with ideas and conclusions. </li></ul><ul><li>Standards- English 2.7.9- Retell stories, including characters, setting and plot. </li></ul><ul><li>Science –Investigate while observing and then describing how animals and plants sometimes cause changes in their surroundings. </li></ul><ul><li>Gardner- Linguistic, Visual/Spatial, Interpersonal </li></ul>
    6. 6. <ul><li>From School Library Journal </li></ul><ul><li>Kindergarten-Grade 2—Henrietta the chicken, star of Souperchicken (Holiday House, 2003), is an avid library user and decides that because reading is so much fun, &quot;writing books must be eggshilarating.&quot; She finds a manual of writing rules and creates her own story-with the unsolicited help of the other fowl. When it is rejected by a publisher, Henrietta decides to self-publish. She takes a copy to her librarian, who tells her to send it to The Corn Book Magazine for review. Henrietta gets another rejection: &quot;odoriferous.&quot; Then she wanders into the library at storytime and sees that her book was chosen best of the year by the children. Henrietta is asked to read it aloud. &quot;She read with dramatic expression. Of course, all the children heard was BUK, BUK, BUK….&quot; The illustrations, a combination of oil paints and digital technology, are bold and colorful. The pictures are busy, with Henrietta at her typewriter while her friends cavort around her. There are imagined scenes in cloud shapes, word balloons, and jokes aplenty. A droll chicken with a repeating line adds to the humor. This offering works on two levels. It's a funny picture book that could be used as a manual on writing.— Ieva Bates, Ann Arbor District Library, MI </li></ul>
    7. 7. <ul><li>Activity- </li></ul><ul><li>1.)Introduce “Plot” and “Main Character” to students. </li></ul><ul><li>2.)Have students think of their own story and come up with a plot and main character. </li></ul><ul><li>3.)Come up with a “Problem of the day” relating it to the story. (Example: Henrietta needs $100 dollars to publish her newest book. If she is selling her old book for 2.00, how many books would she need to sell to earn enough money?) </li></ul><ul><li>Standards- Math- 2.3.1- Relate problem situations to number senses involving addition and subtraction. </li></ul><ul><li>Language Arts- 2.5.1 – “Write brief narratives based on experiences that: move through a logical sequence of events…” </li></ul><ul><li>Gardner-Linguistic, Logical/Mathematical </li></ul>
    8. 8. <ul><li>PreSchool-Grade 2–In spare, rhyming text, a boy and his father, a builder, explore the site of the child's new school. Wearing hard hats, they watch throughout the year as the bulldozer clears the field and the cement mixer pours the foundation, etc., until the building is ready for the first day of classes. Bold acrylic and colored-pencil pictures give the oversize book great appeal–it opens from the bottom up, and the striking illustrations are done from the boy's perspective looking up at the huge machines. The boy concludes, And when I'm a grown-up, I hope I will be/a builder like Dad with a helper like me! The book will be enthusiastically welcomed by youngsters fascinated with construction and big machines. It is also an engaging father/son story. –Judith Constantinides, formerly at East Baton Rouge Parish Main Library, LA Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. </li></ul>
    9. 9. <ul><li>Activity- </li></ul><ul><li>1.) Have students break up into small groups. Give each group a box of Leggos. </li></ul><ul><li>2.) Explain that their job is to construct a building, explaining what it is, what it is used for, and the material that would be used. </li></ul><ul><li>Have the students brainstorm what kind of building they want to construct, listing ideas and potential barriers they might run into. </li></ul><ul><li>3.) Have each group present their project to the class and then set them up around the classroom. </li></ul><ul><li>Standards- Science 2.2.4- Assemble, describe, take apart, and/or reassemble constructions using things as interlocking blocks. </li></ul><ul><li>English- 2.4.1- Create a list of ideas for writing. </li></ul><ul><li>Gardner- Interpersonal, Logical/Mathematical </li></ul>
    10. 10. <ul><li>From School Library Journal </li></ul><ul><li>Grade 1-4–The boys from the The Dangerous Snake and Reptile Club (Tricycle, 2004) are back. After watching a movie about space aliens, the kids are convinced that a rock found in their neighbor's backyard is really a meteor from Mars. They quickly transform their clubhouse into Space Station Mars. Luckily, Neil is an expert on extraterrestrials. He uses his chemistry set to test the meteor for radioactivity and monitors intergalactic communication with his crystal radio. When he picks up strange transmissions, the club members are convinced that the Martians who lost the meteor are on their way back to reclaim it. They find the alien spaceship and return the rock to the alien visitors. This book captures the wonderful time in children's lives when the line between reality and imagination is blurred. The boys are able to have great adventures because they believe in what they are playing. The bright cartoon illustrations, which are chock-full of detail and activity, increase the sense of fun. This is a great choice for independent reading or sharing aloud. –Donna Cardon, Provo City Library, UT Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. </li></ul>
    11. 11. <ul><li>Activity- </li></ul><ul><li>1.) Bring in a number of different rocks. Tell students to pretend they are meteorites and have them observe characteristics of each rock. </li></ul><ul><li>2.) Write down in journals how they are alike and different. </li></ul><ul><li>3.) Have students share with the class their findings. </li></ul><ul><li>4.) Explain they did what many geologists do on a day to day basis and how we find out more about our world when we observe and investigate rocks. </li></ul><ul><li>Standards-Science 2.3.3 – investigate by observing and than describing chunk of rocks and their many sizes and shapes, from boulders to grains of sand. </li></ul><ul><li>English- 2.5.8 Research Application- organizes information by categorizing it into single categories (such as size or color) or includes information gained through observation. </li></ul><ul><li>Gardner- linguistic, bodily/kinesthetic </li></ul>
    12. 12. <ul><li>From School Library Journal </li></ul><ul><li>Grade 2-5-A Gullah story brought into beautiful focus by Pinkney's trademark scratchboard-on-oil drawings. Mentu and his grandmother, Twi, are plantation slaves who live on an island off the coast of Georgia. Twi knows some &quot;powerful root magic&quot; and still yearns for her African home. She remembers the stories and the rhythms of the drums, and shares them with Mentu. One day, a ship bearing new slaves arrives in Teakettle Creek, and the island people beat &quot;ancient rhythms&quot; on their drums announcing the ship's arrival. At first the Ibos think they are back in Africa; when they realize they are not, they refuse to leave the ship. Suddenly, Twi hangs her charm bag on Mentu's neck and begins to run toward the water. Magically, the years slip off her as she beckons to the newcomers. Together, they break away from the slave catchers and disappear under the water. Mentu believes that they are walking home to freedom. This well-told story is unusual and powerful. It raises some interesting questions about the meaning and value of freedom, and of literal interpretation of text. The rhythms hint at Gullah language, but the narrative is clear, accessible, and at the same time poetic. Pinkney's illustrations enhance the power of the tale by being at once realistic and mystical. This thought-provoking story would be a splendid addition to any collection. Linda Greengrass, Bank Street College Library, New York City Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. </li></ul>
    13. 13. <ul><li>Activity- </li></ul><ul><li>1.) Explain more about the history of drums and how they were used in previous cultures. </li></ul><ul><li>2.) Have students construct their own drums using empty oatmeal tubes, wax paper, construction paper and pencils (used as drumsticks). </li></ul><ul><li>3.) Have students create a rhythm or beat in a group and play in front of class. </li></ul><ul><li>4.) Discuss how anyone can make music. </li></ul><ul><li>Standard- Music 2.4.2- Create music collaboratively to enhance a poem or short story using a variety of sound choices. </li></ul><ul><li>Science- 2.1.6 Use tools to investigate, measure, observe, design and build things. </li></ul><ul><li>Gardner- Bodily/Kinesthetic, Musical </li></ul>
    14. 14. <ul><li>Pilkey (When Cats Dream; the Dragon books) is at his best in this highly atmospheric work. Here his trademark color palette glows quietly under the cover of darkness; violet skies and emerald-shadowed fields predominate until the explosion of a fiery dawn. Early one cold morning a boy and his dog rise to deliver newspapers. In almost reverential silence they eat breakfast, prepare the newspapers, then step out into the chill, leaving sleeping parents and sister inside. Pilkey perfectly captures the thrill of being out early, seeing the world so new and having it all to oneself. Something magical is at work on this most ordinary of paper routes, tangible in the controlled hush of the narrative and in the still, moon-lit landscapes. And, at last, as his family awakens to golden sunlight, the paperboy returns to his bed, prepared to enter another familiar Pilkey world: dreamland. Ages 4-10. Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition. </li></ul>
    15. 15. <ul><li>Activity </li></ul><ul><li>1.) Have students do a “self-reflection” journal write. Would you want to do this boys job? How is he showing responsibility? Make sure and use “descriptive” words like the words used in the story. </li></ul><ul><li>2.) Use a problem of the day relating to being a paperboy. Example: If the paperboy in the story delivers paper to 30 houses in the morning and earns 15 cents for each house, how much money did he make? </li></ul><ul><li>3.) Have students work in small groups on the problem and share once finished. The student will explain the reasoning for the problem and how they solved it. </li></ul><ul><li>4.) Have students come up with other summer jobs that they might be able to do to earn extra money. </li></ul><ul><li>Standard- Math- Explain the reasoning used and justify the procedures selected in solving a problem. </li></ul><ul><li>English- 2.7.14- Provide descriptions with careful attention to sensory detail. </li></ul><ul><li>Gardner- Intrapersonal </li></ul>
    16. 16. <ul><li>This picture book admirably conveys the miracle of a seed. Flower pods burst and dispatch their seeds on the wind; the air-borne seeds are subject to myriad disasters; and the ones that make it through the perils of the seasons to become mature flowering plants are still susceptible to being picked, trod upon and otherwise damaged. But nature allows for survivors, and so the tiny seed grows into a giant flower, releasing its seeds and continuing the cycle. As he has demonstrated with The Very Hungry Caterpillar and other books, Carle has an extraordinary kinship with nature. Here we have not just the explanation of the life of a flower, but drama, lessons of life and a lovely spirituality. This is a reissue of the original 1970 edition, with expanded, expansive collage illustrations. The pages, like the seed pods, burst with color. Ages 4-8. Copyright 1987 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition. </li></ul>
    17. 17. <ul><li>Activity- </li></ul><ul><li>1.) Have stations set out in order for students to plant their own plants. Students should have prior knowledge in how to plant. </li></ul><ul><li>2.)Rotate through stations as each student makes their own pot with a plant. </li></ul><ul><li>Explain the importance of watering and nurturing the plant. </li></ul><ul><li>3.) Explain the importance of sunlight. </li></ul><ul><li>4.) Have students fill out a graphic organizer consisting of all the responsibilities that go along with owning and growing a plant. </li></ul><ul><li>Standards- Science- 2.4.3- Observe and explain that plants and animals both need to take in water, animals need to take in food, and plants need light. </li></ul><ul><li>Gardner- Bodily/Kinesthetic </li></ul>
    18. 18. <ul><li>Product Description </li></ul><ul><li>Follow the adventures of Bryan Bronson and his friends Rudy and Olivia as they experience the wonders of the weather. Their journey takes them from a sandstorm on Mars through the earth's atmosphere to survive a hurricane, tornado, flash flood, avalanche, and more. Along the way they see things as strange as snowflakes the size of pizzas and talk to a man who survived a nine-mile fall from an airplane. As they read about these adventures, kids will learn basic facts about the weather and how it works, including information about atmosphere, pressure, sun, clouds, rain, wind, and snow. Experiments include learning about condensation and evaporation, making your own rain gauge, and much more. The book also includes dozens of interesting weather facts and safety tips. </li></ul><ul><li>Mark Eubank graduated from the University of Utah in 1972 with a Bachelor of Science in Meteorology. For twenty years he owned and operated WeatherBank, Inc., a weather consulting firm. Mark was the weatherman for KUTV for twenty-two years and is currently the weatherman for KSL TV in Salt Lake City, Utah. </li></ul><ul><li>Mark A. Hicks is an award-winning illustrator who has done work for many books, magazines, advertising firms, puzzles, and games. He lives with his family in Arizona. </li></ul>
    19. 19. <ul><li>Activity- </li></ul><ul><li>1.) Introduce a thermometer to students and the various parts on it. </li></ul><ul><li>2.) Have students predict what the temperature is outside. Afterwards have students go outside and take the temperature. They will record data in their journals. What is the weather like? </li></ul><ul><li>3.) Introduce simple rhyming and poetry to students. Have them make a poem about their favorite season or type of weather. </li></ul><ul><li>4.)Give students the opportunity to share in front of class. </li></ul><ul><li>Standard- Science 2.1.2 Use tools, such as thermometers, magnifiers, rulers, to gain more information about objects. </li></ul><ul><li>Language Arts - 2.5.4 Write Rhymes and Simple Poems. </li></ul><ul><li>Gardner- Bodily/Kinesthetic, linguistic, interpersonal </li></ul>
    20. 20. <ul><li>In a rollicking, tongue-in-cheek entree to the entomological world, Damselfly Dilly uncovers a plot by a group of sinister spiders who hold a &quot;bugliest bug&quot; contest and secretly plan to consume the credulous contestants. &quot;A ladybug curtsied, tumblebugs flipped, The judges applauded, then licked their lips.&quot; The steady beat of the simple and often clever verse swiftly advances the predictable plot. Meanwhile, the almost fluorescent gouache and pencil illustrations put readers at the swamp-level action with close-ups of the pop-eyed cartoon insects, most portrayed with only four legs and comical humanoid expressions. Busy spreads aglow in yellow and orange buzz with animation, as humorous vignettes show each bug earnestly performing its talent (e.g., a trio of click bugs appears to doo-wop). Shields and Nash (previously paired for Saturday Night at the Dinosaur Stomp) end the tale with a hurrah (stink-bug humor included), and readers will be cheered, although not surprised, to learn which bug is ultimately proclaimed &quot;bugliest.&quot; Tear-out trading cards feature the book's stars with facts and lighthearted prose: &quot;While most know him as Dung Beetle, Tumblebug prefers to be called the Original Pooper Scooper... (he just built and moved into a cozy ball of manure).&quot; Ages 4-8. Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition. </li></ul>
    21. 21. <ul><li>Activity- </li></ul><ul><li>1.) Students will learn about characteristics of bugs and will classify them into groups. </li></ul><ul><li>2.) They will make a table and label the groups according to the certain characteristics. </li></ul><ul><li>3.)Afterwards, they will be able to create their own bug (drawing, painting, etc.) and either put it in the appropriate category or develop their new class of bugs. </li></ul><ul><li>4.) Students will share their created bugs with the class. </li></ul><ul><li>Standard- Science 2.5.6 Explain that sometimes people can find out a lot about a group of things such as insects, plants or rocks, by studying just a few of them. </li></ul><ul><li>Language Arts 2.5.5 Use descriptive words while writing. </li></ul><ul><li>Gardner- Lingustic </li></ul>

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