Learner centered paradigm lauridsen tcc

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  • The abstract for this interactive session is a subset of the paper in the proceedings titled “ Effectiveness of Interaction in Learner Centered Paradigm in Online Education” .
  • We will be examining and discussion twelve tips for cultivating self-directed learning for adult learners.
  • When summarizing theories about Narrative Learning, Merriam, Caffarella, & Baumgartner (2007) recognized that narratives take many forms which can be understood as “storying the curriculum” (pp. 207-210). Source for video image: http://www.tampabay.com/specials/2010/reports/antarctic/
  • Source of video: http://www.tampabay.com/specials/2010/reports/antarctic/ Ask: What is the real story here?
  • What is the real story here? Edible by everything… profound impact of global climate change Source of the video: http://www.tampabay.com/specials/2010/reports/antarctic/
  • The visionary philosophy integrates well with an Eastern cultural way of working together within groups and adds value to teams that have cross cultural diversity.
  • The Teacher Writer: Narrative Theory, Storytelling and Research By Trevor Hay and Julie White Paper Code: WHI05741 http://www.aare.edu.au/05pap/whi05741.pdf Whi05741.pdf
  • The Teacher Writer: Narrative Theory, Storytelling and Research By Trevor Hay and Julie White Paper Code: WHI05741 http://www.aare.edu.au/05pap/whi05741.pdf Whi05741.pdf
  • The Teacher Writer: Narrative Theory, Storytelling and Research, by Trevor Hay and Julie White Paper Code: WHI05741, Retrieved from http://www.aare.edu.au/05pap/whi05741.pdf
  • Story telling and retelling as narrative inquiry in cyber learning environments Heeok Heo Department of Computer Education Sunchon National University http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.85.6678&rep=rep1&type=pdf • Introduction: the learning objective and learning contexts are explained before getting started. • Story telling: the pre-designed animation as a story is presented in the interactive mode. • Articulation: the concepts and principles included in the story are articulated and reviewed in text and graphic styles. • Story retelling: it requires learners to retelling or creating their own story using writing tools and sharing it with others using communication tools. The whole cycle sets up in a recursive, non-linear way, which learners can go ahead and back within the learning process by their choice and in response to the audience.
  • http://www.slideshare.net/eschipul/storytelling-through-social-media-the-modern-narrative-defined Ed Schipul
  • http://www.slideshare.net/eschipul/storytelling-through-social-media-the-modern-narrative-defined Ed Schipul
  • http://www.slideshare.net/eschipul/storytelling-through-social-media-the-modern-narrative-defined Ed Schipul
  • http://www.slideshare.net/eschipul/storytelling-through-social-media-the-modern-narrative-defined Ed Schipul
  • http://www.slideshare.net/eschipul/storytelling-through-social-media-the-modern-narrative-defined Ed Schipul
  • http://www.slideshare.net/eschipul/storytelling-through-social-media-the-modern-narrative-defined Ed Schipul
  • http://millennium-project.org/millennium/images/MPlogo.jpg http://effective.leadershipdevelopment.edu.au/wp-content/uploads/subscribe-to-effective-leadership-development-community.jpg
  • If it bleeds it leads Crisis Storytelling: Fisher’s Narrative Paradigm and News Reporting Christopher T. Caldiero, Fairleigh Dickinson University American Communication Journal A publication of the American Communication Association http://www.acjournal.org/holdings/vol9/spring/articles/storytelling.html#charts Narratives within News Magazines A close reading of the texts reveals certain stylistic patterns. These patterns are grouped into five different narrative types: 1) individual and collective narratives (stories of individuals and groups), 2) scape-goating (blame) narratives, 3) prevention narratives (narrative passages which discuss how the crisis might have been prevented), 4) imagined futures narratives (narrative passages about the future), and 5) reflection narratives (narrative passages of a “reflective" nature). These elements became recognizable only after examining the coverage of crises in the artifacts.
  • Source for image: http://oaks.nvg.org/sa3ra7.html   The Great Learning. Non-Western ways of thinking is familiar to members of an outsourced team. Merriam, Caffarella, & Baumgartner (2007) acknowledge The Great Learning, which described a holistic approach for adult learning, “a highly complex process, involving commitment, continuous effort” (p. 227) which is more relevant to spiritual development than to acquisition of technical skills. To create harmony and trust in virtual learning teams, an instructor should assume the role of facilitator or mentor by becoming a stakeholder in team successes.
  • The non-western way of thinking contributes to effective online communications for diverse teams in peer-to-peer collaboration. The philosopher Confucius expressed the insight that “the cultivation of the person depends on the rectifying of the mind” (500 B.C.E) which can be understood as expressing meaning as reasoning that is integrated with observations. Source for image: http://www.geojan.com/wp-content/uploads/colaboration.jpg
  • While the world is constantly changing, full of challenges and stress, we can recognize an essential knowing that our present reality as an experience of synergy or of disharmony. Stories bring teams together. Source for image: http://oaks.nvg.org/sa3ra7.html
  • Source for image: http://www.geojan.com/wp-content/uploads/colaboration.jpg
  • Source for image: http://www.geojan.com/wp-content/uploads/colaboration.jpg
  • http://www.iste.org/Content/NavigationMenu/NETS/ForAdministrators/2009Standards/NETS-A_2009.pdf Building a scenario about the alternatives enlivens team brainstorming and brings out the wisdom of team-thinking. This means going beyond the minimum interpretation of assignments and digging deeper into research. For teachers who engage in growth and leadership, a goal is to demonstrate “a vision of technology infusion, participating in shared decision making and community building, and developing the leadership and technology skills” (ISTE, 2008, ¶ 5) in order to meet standards and performance indicators of the programs. A successful program is designed to cultivate ways of knowing.
  • http://www.iste.org/Content/NavigationMenu/NETS/ForAdministrators/2009Standards/NETS-A_2009.pdf Building a scenario about the alternatives enlivens team brainstorming and brings out the wisdom of team-thinking. This means going beyond the minimum interpretation of assignments and digging deeper into research. For teachers who engage in growth and leadership, a goal is to demonstrate “a vision of technology infusion, participating in shared decision making and community building, and developing the leadership and technology skills” (ISTE, 2008, ¶ 5) in order to meet standards and performance indicators of the programs. A successful program is designed to cultivate ways of knowing.
  • Source for images: http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.geojan.com/wp-content/uploads/ http://www.geojan.com/wp-content/uploads/colaboration.jpg
  • Source for images: http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.geojan.com/wp-content/uploads/ http://www.geojan.com/wp-content/uploads/colaboration.jpg
  • Source for image: http://www.slideshare.net/eschipul/storytelling-through-social-media-the-modern-narrative-defined
  • Source: http://www.blog.iqmatrix.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/04/learning-style.jpg “ A positive influence of performance standards is best when it based on awareness of differences in learning styles.”
  • Moallem found that “integrating student preferences for learning helps the course designers to improve interactivity and social presence in online learning environments” (2008, p. 240). His discussion references Kolb’s framework for basic learning styles integrated with that of Felder & Silverman’s.
  • Source for image: http://www.leopard-learning.com/images/Kolbcycle.jpg This anticipates that learners can function in a less preferred mode, helping to develop skills in those modes. Understanding the different learning styles of students can put into perspectives the ways in which students respond to instruction or mentoring. This leads to applying the concept of Andragogy compared to pedagogy. Learning Styles These learning styles are as follows: Converger; Diverger; Assimilator; Accomodator; Convergers are characterized by abstract conceptualization and active experimentation. They are good at making practical applications of ideas and using   deductive reasoning to solve problem Divergers tend toward concrete experience and reflective observation. They are imaginative and are good at coming up with ideas and seeing things from different perspectives Assimilators are characterized by abstract conceptualization and reflective observation. They are capable of creating   theoretical models by means of   inductive reasoning Accommodators use concrete experience and active experimentation. They are good at actively engaging with the world and actually doing things instead of merely reading about and studying them   .
  • Source for image: http://www.leopard-learning.com/images/Kolbcycle.jpg The goal of different learning styles is intended to suggest teaching each student exclusively in the manner that he or she prefers. In a context of the Myer-Briggs personality types, Felder (1996) concludes that the essence of balanced instruction is to "teach around the cycle," making sure that every style is addressed to some extent by the instructor. If this approach is followed, then all students will receive learning that addresses their preferences in some moments and not being uncomfortable when they are confused.
  • Source of image: http://www.blog.iqmatrix.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/04/learning-style.jpg
  • http://www.blog.iqmatrix.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/04/learning-style.jpg http://blog.iqmatrix.com/mind-map/accelerated-learning-mind-map
  • … population stats is an indicator of what? …Tip #4 Build upon a problem-oriented approach Demographic of Online Learners. A professor of learning technology at Harvard described learners as “more sophisticated and the expectations for online professional development are rising” (Dede, 2009, p. 3). Students enrolled in on-line courses are often full time workers with an ambition to gain technical skills perceived to increase success in the information technology (IT) industry. Satisfying the Demand for Online Education. Availability of accurate market data for forecasting future demands for online education is unavailable but can be extrapolated from recently published statistics, so, the models assume a continuation of the status quo. The statistics in Table 1 indicate that the pace of connectivity will continue to escalate as use of video objects and social networking applications soak up the available broadband. Learning objects have taken on the attributes of eCommerce objects for distribution by way of Voice-over-IP. The statistics show an escalation of user growth and penetration.
  • Now, we will zoom in on detail, from top left down, comparing Andragogy to pedagogy starting with demands of learning, the role played by instructors, live experiences (a source of stories), the purpose of learning and the outcomes of learning experiences.
  • Source of image: http://www.blog.iqmatrix.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/05/goal-setting-process.jpg
  • Source of image: http://www.blog.iqmatrix.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/05/goal-setting-process.jpg Ask: What behaviors eliminate self sabotage? Looking for ideas that express the concepts of procrastination, conflicting priorities, weak motivation, lack of confidence, drifting along without a goals…
  • Figure 3 Noaka's knowledge creation model (cited in Xu & Quaddus, 2005, Figure 1)
  • http://www.blog.iqmatrix.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/05/goal-setting-process.jpg Ask: What concept(s) illustrated here make the strongest difference for overcoming drift or self sabotage? Looking for the keywords that include the concept of “Motivation”
  • http://sugarmtnfarm.com/blog/uploaded_images/ScaffoldingUpDSCF0888.jpg
  • Source of image: http://www.mathmediator.net/images/bridge.jpg
  • http://lh4.ggpht.com/_Q2U5uycu3Uk/Scbf_myXXWI/AAAAAAAAC5U/KVVKt9Uivmk/%5BUNSET%5D.png?imgmax=800
  • http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.und.nodak.edu/dept/ehd/journal/Spring%25202006/202.jpg http://www.und.nodak.edu/dept/ehd/journal/Spring%202006/brockberg.htm
  • http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.und.nodak.edu/dept/ehd/journal/Spring%25202006/202.jpg http://www.und.nodak.edu/dept/ehd/journal/Spring%202006/brockberg.htm
  • http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.und.nodak.edu/dept/ehd/journal/Spring%25202006/ http://www.und.nodak.edu/dept/ehd/journal/Spring%202006/brockberg.htm
  • http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.und.nodak.edu/dept/ehd/journal/Spring%25202006/202.jpg http://www.und.nodak.edu/dept/ehd/journal/Spring%202006/brockberg.htm
  • http://www.ascilite.org.au/conferences/perth97/papers/Harper/Image63.gif http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.ascilite.org.au/conferences/perth97/papers/Harper/Image63.gif
  • http://www.ascilite.org.au/conferences/perth97/papers/Harper/Image63.gif http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.ascilite.org.au/conferences/perth97/papers/Harper/Image63.gif&imgrefurl=http://www.ascilite.org.au/conferences/perth97/papers/Harper/Harper.html&usg=__M_Nk644-luAqfDq0BdFna6BoQn0=&h=585&w=583&sz=13&hl=en&start=259&sig2=2jFN9zrDCST5lLTjWGDJrw&itbs=1&tbnid=ZtjjOkKDZICi4M:&tbnh=135&tbnw=135&prev=/images%3Fq%3DScaffolding%2BConcept%2BApplied.%26start%3D240%26hl%3Den%26sa%3DN%26ndsp%3D20%26tbs%3Disch:1&ei=gDjIS8msOJ6ssQPJ8an1BA
  • http://www.ascilite.org.au/conferences/perth97/papers/Harper/Image63.gif http://www.ascilite.org.au/conferences/perth97/papers/Harper/Harper.html Creating Motivating Interactive Learning Environments: a Constructivist View Barry Harper, Barry_Harper@uow.edu.au Graduate School of Education, Faculty of Education   John Hedberg, John_Hedberg@uow.edu.au Interactive Multimedia Learning Laboratory http://www.immll.uow.edu.au/ University of Wollongong,  
  • http://www.ascilite.org.au/conferences/perth97/papers/Harper/Image63.gif http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.ascilite.org.au/conferences/perth97/papers/Harper/Image63.gif
  • http://www.scielo.org.co/img/revistas/prf/n6/n6a16d1.gif http://www.scielo.org.co/scielo.php?pid=S1657-07902005000100016&script=sci_arttext
  • Source of image: http://emergingyouth.files.wordpress.com/2010/02/adobe-flex-developer-writing-mentoring-concept-on-a-white-board.jpg Teacher as a Mediator. The paradigm shift is toward the teacher-as-a-mediator of community of learners. A virtual learning community culture is ideal for joint assignments which evaluate the process of team formation as well as create a high quality deliverable that is a result of inspiration and collaboration. This principle ties to approximating supported by the teacher providing scaffolding between his or her direct experience, the text book, and the students’ level of knowledge. The responsibility is to provide scaffolding when it is necessary
  • Figure 3 Noaka's knowledge creation model (cited in Xu & Quaddus, 2005, Figure 1)
  • Critical Incident Questionaire (CIQ). Brookfield (1986) extends an idea put for the by Mezirow (1985) called “perspective formation”, by achieving “critical reflectivity” that “adults come to reflect on their self-images, changes in their self-concepts, question their previously internalized norms (behavioral and moral), and reinterpret their current and past behaviors from a new perspective …” (pp. 213-214). Brookfield (1990) defines critical incidents as brief descriptions written by learners of significant events in their lives. This list is my own adaptation as an online learning end of course survey is shown in using open discussion threads.
  • My favorite evaluation question is about the lights turning on
  • http://flash.lakeheadu.ca/~kbrown/F2250%20Webpages/group_learning_cycle.gif http://flash.lakeheadu.ca/~kbrown/F2250%20Webpages/kolbs_learning_cycle.html
  • http://4h.wsu.edu/challenge/images/do-apply-reflect.gif http://www.speedofcreativity.org/category/edtech/distributed-learning/page/2/
  • Source of image: http://www.cultivate-int.org/issue8/handscape/index.html Ask: When fragments of learning seems to be too scattered, how do you pull them together?
  • Source of image: http://www.cultivate-int.org/issue8/handscape/index.html Ask: When fragments of learning seems to be too scattered, how do you pull them together?
  • Source of banner: http://shiftingtheparadigm.org/
  • Source of banner: http://shiftingtheparadigm.org/ Source of image: http://www.nyrealestatelawblog.com/j0438753.jpg
  • Source of image: http://www.nyrealestatelawblog.com/j0438753.jpg

Transcript

  • 1. Learner Centered Paradigm in Online Education Concurrent A ra16 4pm HST Barbara Lauridsen, MBA Adjunct Faculty, National University Learner, PhD Information Technology Education, Capella University [email_address] www.barbaralauridsen.com TCC Online Conference April 20-22, 2010     Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow:         Communication, Collaboration, Communities, Mobility and Best Choices
  • 2. Session Abstract
    • The session is for educators, program administrators and PhD Learners intending to teach. This participatory session focuses on “What is known about how adults learn and are motivated to participate in online learning to advance their career?”
    • The session shares my own professional practice as a learning facilitator, in the context of exploring how to be effective in an online environment and explores the lenses through which educators view their own practice to support learners to become self directed.
  • 3. Agenda
    • Tip # 1 Become Story Centered
    • Tip # 2 Open evaluation of learning experience increases awareness/trust
    • Tip # 3 Teach “Around the Circle”
    • Tip # 4 Build upon a problem-oriented approach
    • Tip # 5 Encourage goal orientation
    • Tip # 6 Build upon prior knowledge
    • Tip # 7 Follow a path from teacher to moderator to facilitator to mentor
    • Tip # 8 Evaluate our own teaching
    • Tip # 9 Evaluate the shared learning experience
    • Tip #10 Cultivate a holistic approach
    • Tip #11 Coach, Motivate, Delegate, Moderate, Facilitate
    • Tip #12 Participate in shifting the paradigm
  • 4. ST#1 Story Telling and Narratives .… “storying the curriculum”
  • 5. ST#2 Scenarios provide an understanding, so, when a solution is drafted, it reflects a clear understanding of the problem.
  • 6. ST#3 “ Bell weather” of climate change.
  • 7. T#1a Tip #1 a – Become Story Centered Stories hold the interest of people especially when to provide meaningful insights. Stories help make the unknown lose its uncertainty and ambiguity.
  • 8. T#1b Tip #1 b – Become Story Centered 1. What happened? 2. 3.
  • 9. T#1c Tip #1 c – Become Story Centered 1. What happened? 2. How do we know? 3.
  • 10. T#1d Tip #1 d – Become Story Centered 1. What happened? 2. How do we know? 3. What does it mean?
  • 11. T#1e Tip #1 e – Become Story Centered 1. What happened? 2. How do we know? 3. What does it mean? Heo, H. (2004) “Story telling and retelling as narrative inquiry in cyber learning environments. Department of Computer Education Sunchon National University
  • 12. T#1j Tip #1 j – Become Story Centered
  • 13. T#1k Tip #1 k – Become Story Centered
  • 14. T#1q Tip #1 q – Become Story Centered
  • 15. T#1r Tip #1 r – Become Story Centered
  • 16. T#1s Tip #1 s – Become Story Centered
  • 17. T#1u Tip #1 u – Become Story Centered
  • 18. Which Story to Tell? millennium-project.org effective.leadershipdevelopment.edu.au www.geojan.com
  • 19. News narratives…news? or… only an interpretation of a story?
    • individual and collective stories
    • scape-goating or blame
    • passages which discuss how the crisis might have been prevented
    • imagined futures
    • reflections
    “ Crisis Storytelling: Fisher’s Narrative Paradigm and News Reporting” American Communication Journal
  • 20. The Great Learning a
    • The non-western way of thinking contributes to effective online communications for diverse teams in peer-to-peer collaboration.
    • A well-known philosopher expressed the insight that the cultivation of the person depends on the “ rectifying of the mind ” (Confucius, 500 B.C.E) …which can be understood as expressing meaning in reasoning …
  • 21. The Great Learning b
    • The non-western way of thinking contributes to effective online communications for diverse teams in peer-to-peer collaboration.
    • A well-known philosopher expressed the insight that the cultivation of the person depends on the “ rectifying of the mind ” (Confucius, 500 B.C.E) …which can be understood as expressing meaning in reasoning … that is integrated with observations.
  • 22. The Great Learning c
    • While the world is constantly changing, full of challenges and stress, we can recognize an essential knowing that our present reality as an experience of synergy or of disharmony.
    • Stories bring teams together.
  • 23. The Great Learning d
    • While the world is constantly changing, full of challenges and stress, we can recognize an essential knowing that our present reality as an experience of synergy or of disharmony.
    • Stories bring teams together.
  • 24. The Great Learning e
    • While the world is constantly changing, full of challenges and stress, we can recognize an essential knowing that our present reality as an experience of synergy or of disharmony.
    • Stories bring teams together.
  • 25. Visionary Performance Indicators a
    • The ISTE National Educational Technology Standards (NETS•A) and Performance Indicators for Administrators:
        • Visionary Leadership
        • Digital-Age Learning Culture
        • Excellence in Professional Practice
        • Systemic Improvement
        • Digital Citizenship
  • 26. Visionary Performance Indicators b
    • The ISTE National Educational Technology Standards (NETS•A) and Performance Indicators for Administrators:
        • Visionary Leadership
        • Digital-Age Learning Culture
        • Excellence in Professional Practice
        • Systemic Improvement
        • Digital Citizenship
    A successful program is designed to cultivate ways of knowing .
  • 27. Visionary Performance Indicators c A successful program is designed to cultivate ways of knowing .
  • 28. Visionary Performance Indicators d
        • 1. Visionary Leadership
        • 2. Digital-Age Learning Culture
        • 3. Excellence in Professional Practice
        • 4. Systemic Improvement
        • 5. Digital Citizenship
  • 29. Tip #2 Open evaluation of learning experience increases awareness and trust
    • A successful program is designed to cultivate ways of knowing .
    • … inspires and facilitates stakeholders toward a “ shared vision of purposeful change that maximizes use of digital-age resources to meet and exceed learning goals, support effective instructional practice, and maximize performance of district and school leaders” (ISTE, 2009).
  • 30. Visualization / Mind Mapping
  • 31. Kolb’s Learning Styles e Accomodator Diverger Converger Assimilator
  • 32. Kolb’s Learning Styles f
  • 33. Tip #3 Teach “Around the Circle”
  • 34. Learning Styles / Mind Mapping
  • 35. Learning Styles / Influences What are the influences on how we learn? What is the process we go through to learn? What are the demographics of adult learners now? A successful program is designed to cultivate ways of knowing .
  • 36. … building upon problems, and solutions...
  • 37. Andragogy vs. Pedagogy b Demands of learning Learners balance life responsibilities with chosen demands of lea r ning. Learners can devote more time to the demands of learning, responsibilities are taken care of by someone else Role of instructor (facilitator) Learners are autonomous and self directed. Facilitators guide the learners to their own knowledge Learners rely on the instructor to direct the learning. Fact based lecturing is often the mode of knowledge transmission
  • 38. Andragogy vs. Pedagogy c Life experiences ( stories, lessons) Learners apply lessons from life experiences, recognizing the value in connecting the learning to own knowledge base Learners build a knowledge base and are shown how life experiences connect with the present learning. Learning Purpose Learners become goal oriented and define the purpose served by new information Learners accept instructions to learn certain information Learning Retention Learning is self-initiated, self propelling and long term Learning is compulsory and tends to be forgotten shortly after instruction.
  • 39. Tip #5 Encourage goal orientation… … and define purpose served by new information
  • 40. Tip #5 Encourage goal orientation… … and define purpose served by new information Self-Sabotaging Goal Setting Forces What behaviors exhibit self-sabotage?
  • 41. Tip #6 Build upon prior knowledge a ... “applying knowledge in practice and reflects the concept of learning by doing” (Xu & Quaddus, 2005). In support of the inductive approach, means guiding learners into internalizing lessons for explicit knowledge. A successful program is designed to cultivate ways of knowing .
  • 42. Tip #6 Build upon prior knowledge b
  • 43. Five Phase Model Applied. Phase Role of Model Role of Model 1 Modeling Real-life tasks with explicit guidance using artifacts and lectures that explain “tricks of the trade” 2 Approximating Scaffolding Coaching and providing immediate feedback to learners 3 Fading, observing and Coaching Delegating coaching to teams, lighten the scaffolding, more dialog instead of lecture style instructions 4 Self-Directed Learning (by individuals and teams) Provide assistance. Encourage requests for further guidance based on direction already established independently. 5 Generalizing contextuality During an end-of-course evaluation generalize what has been accomplished.
  • 44. Scaffolding Concept Applied.
  • 45. Scaffolding as a metaphor… Math Mediator
  • 46. Scaffolding Concept Applied b
  • 47. “ Storying the Curriculum”… a 1. What happened? 2. 3. Tip #4 build upon a problem-oriented approach
  • 48. 1. What happened? 2. How do we know? 3. “ Storying the Curriculum”… b Tip #6 build upon prior knowledge
  • 49. 1. What happened? 2. How do we know? 3. What does it mean? “ Storying the Curriculum”… c Tip #9 evaluate shared learning experience Tip #8 Evaluate our own teaching
  • 50. “ Storying the Curriculum”… . 1. What happened? 2. How do we know? 3. What does it mean? Tip #7 … teacher > mediator > facilitator > mentor
  • 51. Tip #6 Build upon prior knowledge a 1. What happened? 2. 3. Tip #6
  • 52. Tip #6 Build upon prior knowledge b 1. What happened? 2. How do we know? 3. Tip #6
  • 53. Tip #6 Build upon prior knowledge c 1. What happened? 2. How do we know? 3. What does it mean? Tip #6
  • 54. Tip #6 Tip #7 … teacher > mediator > facilitator > mentor
  • 55. Tip #7 …teacher > mediator > facilitator > mentor Tip #7
  • 56. Tip #7 Tip #7 …teacher > mediator > facilitator > mentor
  • 57. Tip #8 Evaluate our own teaching a Tip #8
  • 58. Tip #8 Evaluate our own teaching b Tip #8 Evaluation Criteria (end of course survey set up as asynchronous discussion) #1: Which of the learning outcomes was most meaningful to you? Why? #2: Which learning segment of this course engaged you the most? or had the most relevant to your learning agenda? #3: Which lesson was the least interesting to you? ... which did not grab your attention? Why? #4: What event took place in this class that was the most meaningful to you? Why? #5: What lesson or event is this class was the most puzzling or confusing to you? Why? How could it be corrected? #6: If you had an "ah hah!" moment, when the light of understanding turned on, what was it? #7: What was the advantage of doing a case study, together with a virtual team?
  • 59. Tip #8 Evaluate our own teaching c Tip #8 Evaluation Criteria (end of course survey set up as asynchronous discussion) #1: Which of the learning outcomes was most meaningful to you? Why? #2: Which learning segment of this course engaged you the most? or had the most relevant to your learning agenda? #3: Which lesson was the least interesting to you? ... which did not grab your attention? Why? #4: What event took place in this class that was the most meaningful to you? Why? #5: What lesson or event is this class was the most puzzling or confusing to you? Why? How could it be corrected? #6: If you had an "ah hah!" moment, when the light of understanding turned on, what was it? #7: What was the advantage of doing a case study, together with a virtual team?
  • 60. Tip #9
  • 61. Tip #9 Evaluate shared learning experience c Tip #9
  • 62. Tip #10 Cultivate wholeness Tip #10
  • 63. Tip #10 Cultivate wholeness Tip #10
  • 64. Tip #10 Cultivate holistic approach a Tip #10
  • 65. Tip #11 Coach, Motivate, Delegate, Moderate, Facilitate b Tip #11
  • 66. Tip #11 Coach, Motivate, Delegate, Moderate, Facilitate c Tip #11
  • 67. Tip #11 Coach, Motivate, Delegate, Moderate, Facilitate d Tip #11
  • 68. Tip #11 Coach, Motivate, Delegate, Moderate , Facilitate e Tip #11
  • 69. Tip #11 Coach, Motivate, Delegate, Moderate, Facilitate a Tip #11
  • 70. Tip #12 Participate in shifting the paradigm a Tip #12
  • 71. Tip #12 Participate in shifting the paradigm b Tip #12 A successful program is designed to cultivate ways of knowing .
  • 72. Summary
    • Tip #1 Become Story Centered
    • Tip #2 Open evaluation of experience increases awareness/trust
    • Tip #3 Teach “Around the Circle”
    • Tip #4 Build upon a problem-oriented approach
    • Tip #5 Encourage goal orientation
    • Tip #6 Build upon prior knowledge
    • Tip #7 Path from teacher to moderator to facilitator to mentor
    • Tip #8 Evaluate our own teaching
    • Tip #9 Evaluate the shared learning experience
    • Tip #10 Cultivate a holistic approach
    • Tip #11 Coach, Motivate, Delegate, Moderate, Facilitate
    • Tip #12 Participate in shifting the paradigm
  • 73. Ideas?